Results tagged ‘ American League ’

YU members eligible for postseason Pre-on-sale

Yankees Universe members will be permitted to purchase subject to availability a maximum number of eight tickets to each potential game to be played at Yankee Stadium during the 2013 American League postseason: the Wild Card Game, the Division Series and the League Championship Series.

When purchasing tickets you will be required to enter a predetermined password for each game for which you would like to purchase tickets. Please make certain that you enter your password as it appears, as the password is case sensitive. The password can only be used beginning at your designated Pre-on-sale time. If you have any questions regarding your predetermined password, please call (212) YANKEES.

The purchase opportunity begins at 4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19, and ends at 10 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22. Click the “Buy Tickets Thursday at 4 PM ET” link you received in the e-mail and click the T next to the game you want to attend on the page.

To complete a transaction, you will be required to either create a new Ticketmaster account or login using your “My Ticketmaster” account. If you already have a “My Ticketmaster” account, please use your existing “My Ticketmaster” account and associated e-mail address and password to login. If you are not sure of your “My Ticketmaster” account login and password, please contact Ticketmaster or follow the Ticketmaster online instructions for “Forgot Password.”

The Yankees recommend that you have a Ticketmaster account and Ticketmaster password before you attempt to purchase the limited number of tickets available during the Pre-on-sale. Please be advised that your “My Ticketmaster’ account is different from your “My Yankees Account.” Your “My Ticketmaster” password is different from the password you receive to participate in the Pre-on-sale and your password to login to your “My Yankees Account.”

For guests with visual impairments who may have difficulties navigating the Pre-on-sale purchasing process via ticketmaster.com, please contact the Yankees’ Office of Disabled Services at (718) 579-4510 (voice) or (718) 579-4595 (TTY).

All ticket purchases are subject to availability as determined by the Yankees in their sole and absolute discretion at the time of purchase. Orders exceeding the assigned respective ticket limits will be canceled without contact from Ticketmaster or the Yankees.

Tattered pen can’t prevent Bosox onslaught

Now you know why it was so important for the Yankees to get quality starts from Ivan Nova and Andy Pettitte in the first two games of the four-game series against the Red Sox. The Yankees were relying on the back end of the bullpen to get them through the third game. After Nova had his briefest outing (four innings) Thursday night and Pettitte turned an 8-3 lead over to the bullpen Friday night with the relievers blowing both games, the Yankees had to turn to a trio of late-season Triple A call-ups to navigate through one of the toughest lineups in the league.

The result naturally was disastrous. David Huff, who had pitched well in relief since Aug. 16 (two earned runs in 16 innings) termed his 3 1/3-inning outing Saturday “terrible.” No one would dispute it. He hit just about every bat in the Boston order and allowed nine earned runs and eight hits, including two home runs. Jim Miller, summoned after Scranton’s season was over, could not stem the tide as the Red Sox dusted him off for three runs and three hits, one a home run, in 1 1/3 innings. Only Brett Marshall, who entered the game with the Yankees down 12-3 in the fifth, was the one bright light with 4 1/3 serviceable innings in which he yielded one run and three hits.

The Yankees’ offense put up a good fight in the 13-9 loss. Their 12 hits were spread among nine players. They cut the deficit to three runs at one point. The problem was that point was the eighth inning. When Mike Napoli took Marshall deep in the ninth, somehow it seemed to shut the door. Napoli, who has feasted off Yankees pitching all year (.404, four doubles, seven home runs, 23 RBI in 12 games and 57 at-bats), is 7-for-12 (.583) with a double, three homers and eight RBI in this series.

The Red Sox came to town after slugging eight home runs in one game and have continued the power surge with eight homers in the series. Boston starter John Lackey, who has had the worst run support for an American League starting pitcher this year, could not seem to handle the burst of offense but ended up with the victory despite giving up seven runs in 5 1/3 innings.

The Yankees knew coming in that the bullpen is in tatters. David Robertson will be out another several days because of right shoulder tendinitis. Boone Logan has an inflamed left biceps that will shelve him for at least three days, and Shawn Kelley has been unavailable due to a strained right triceps.

On top of that, the Yankees lost shortstop Derek Jeter for who knows how long. Manager Joe Girardi pulled the captain when he saw him running tentatively on his left leg. Jeter also had trouble planting his surgical left ankle in the sixth and threw the ball past first baseman Lyle Overbay on an infield single by Jonny Gomes. DJ was sent for a CT scan, which the Yankees said was negative. Nevertheless, they sent the results to Charlotte, N.C., surgeon Dr. Robert Anderson, who performed the operation on Jeter’s ankle last October.

Let’s be honest, the Yankees were going to have a tough time trying to catch the first-place Red Sox in the AL East. The Bombers were eight games behind when the series began, but their spirits were high as they hoped to do their rivals some damage. The Red Sox have pushed the Yankees 11 games back in historic if somewhat dubious fashion. The Elias Sports Bureau reported that this is the first time in franchise history that the Yankees lost three games in a row when they scored at least seven runs in each game.

It has been clear for some time that the Yankees’ only path to the postseason is through a wild-card berth. Thanks to a current bumpy stretch by the Rays, the Yanks remain in contention there, but their losses to Boston have allowed the Orioles, Indians and even the Royals to encroach their space.

Considering the state of the bullpen, Hiroki Kuroda will have to be awfully good Sunday to avoid an embarrassing sweep at Yankee Stadium to the Red Sox.

Playoff atmopshere for Yankees-Red Sox

With the temperatures cooling down and the combatants representing the oldest rivalry in the American League, there was a postseason atmosphere Thursday night at Yankee Stadium as the Yankees and the Red Sox opened a four-game series. Boston held a 5 ½-game lead over the Rays in the AL East with the Yankees in third place eight games back.

A month ago, the Yankees were left for dead, and while a division title remains a tall order they have moved into serious contention for one of the wild-card berths as they trail Tampa Bay for the second entry by only 2 ½ games. The Rays were at Anaheim Thursday night.

The Yanks are 5-7 this season against Boston and have already surpassed their loss total to the Red Sox of last year. The Yankees have won 10 of the past 17 regular-season games between the club and 21 of the past 34. In 2012, the Yankees were 13-5 against Boston. It marked their first winning season against the Red Sox since 2007 (10-8).

At the Stadium, the Yankees have won six of their past 10 games and 10 of their past 18 between the teams and are 31-29 against the Red Sox at home since 2007. In 2012, the Yankees were 6-3 against Boston, their first winning home season series since 2009 (7-2).

Derek Jeter leads all active major leaguers with 264 games and 321hits against Boston and ranks second in runs (168) and RBI (124). The Elias Sports Bureau reports that Jeter’s 142 winning games in the regular season against the Red Sox are the most for any player who entered the majors since 1960.

Yankees batters were hit by four pitches in their Aug. 18 victory at Fenway Park. The victims were Alex Rodriguez, Brett Gardner, Jayson Nix and Robinson Cano. It was their most hit batters in a single game since April 15, 2000 at the Stadium against the Royals (Tino Martinez, Bernie Williams, Clay Bellinger twice). The Yankees were hit six times over the three-game Boston series, which matched the Yankees’ most hit by pitchers of any length against any team over the past 100 seasons. It also occurred June 7-9, 2011 at the Stadium against the Red Sox in three games; Sept. 4-8, 1945 at the Stadium against the Tigers in seven games and May 12-15, 1923 at Detroit in four games.

The Yankees have been hit with five or more pitches in 22 series all time, with seven of them coming at the hands of the Red Sox since 2000. According to Elias, the only time the Yankees have been hit with more pitches in a series was a five-game set June 20-24, 1913 at Washington in which a single-game team-record six Yankees got hit in the series opener by Senators pitchers.

Late rally propels Yanks to exhilarating victory

There was an impending disaster facing the Yankees for seven innings Tuesday night. They were actually in danger of losing to the White Sox at a time when the Yankees need to have the upper hand against the lower order of the American League if they intend to play in October.

Let’s be fair here. The White Sox are a different team with Chris Sale on the mound. He has pitched far better (2.97 ERA) than his 10-12 record would indicate. And against the Yankees, he is simply lights out (2-0, 1.05 ERA). Well, at least until the eighth inning Tuesday night. The Yanks finally put enough of a dent in his armor for White Sox manager Robin Ventura to turn to his bullpen.

Please send our old pal a thank you note.

After Derek Jeter singled and Robinson Cano doubled with one out against Sale, the Yankees jumped on three Chicago relief pitchers for a five-run rally that had even more impact than the eight-run inning they exhibited the day before. This late charge that turned a potential loss into an exhilarating, 6-4 victory and had the Yankee Stadium crowd of 33,215 sounding like the whole borough of the Bronx was in attendance.

Cano’s double off the left field auxiliary scoreboard came on a two-strike pitch from Sale. So did the single by Alfonso Soriano that got the Yankees to 4-3 and the single by Alex Rodriguez that kept the line moving, both off righthander Nate Jones (4-5).

Curtis Granderson greeted lefthander Donnie Veal with a single to center that tied the score. There was a temporary sigh when Mark Reynolds struck out, but another abrupt message to an incoming reliever was in store. Eduardo Nunez, who made one of the best defensive plays of the game, got the crowd roaring with a double down the left field line to break the tie and tack on an insurance run as well.

Mariano Rivera laced it up into a bow with his 40th save; a huge victory for the Yankees, who jumped back in front of the Orioles into third place in the AL East and climbed a half-game closer to the Rays, who took a five-game losing streak into their game against the Angels. This was a game that will resonate for the Yankees if they can complete their quest for a postseason berth that seemed in serious peril after their disappointing 2-4 trip through St. Petersburg, Fla., and Toronto a week ago.

The pitcher the Yankees have relied on the most this season is showing signs of wear, which is not unusual for someone his age. Hiroki Kuroda, 38, has clearly hit a wall. He was not terrible Tuesday night but not good enough to beat the beatable White Sox. His teammates got him off the hook to avoid what would have been his fourth straight loss, but they owed him as much.

For four innings, Kuroda matched Sale in a 1-1 game. The Chicago run in the first inning ended Kuroda’s 21 2/3 scoreless innings streak at the Stadium. The Yankees’ run in the second came on a double steal with Vernon Wells scoring from third base.

Then in the fifth, Kuroda began to crack. He gave up a leadoff single to Alejandro De Aza and walked Gordon Beckham in an 11-pitch at-bat. Alexi Ramirez somehow got around on a 94-mph sinker and hit a hard grounder down the left field line. Soriano, who has played well in left field since coming to the Yankees, couldn’t stop the ball before it got to the corner and rolled past him as Ramirez legged out a two-run triple.

Kuroda and his infielders kept the inning from being worse. Dunn couldn’t get the ball past a tight infield and grounded out to Cano, who checked Ramirez at third. Nunez at shortstop went one better by gloving a liner by Paul Konerko and firing to Rodriguez at third base to double-off Ramirez.

Okay, 3-1 in the fifth is not the end of the world, but the Yankees couldn’t fire back right away. They failed to capitalize on Nunez’s leadoff double in the bottom of the fifth and stranded him at second base. In the seventh came that rarity when a player hit a foul home run and in the same at-bat hits a fair home run. De Aza’s 15th jack of the year made it 4-1 and ended Kuroda’s outing.

But not the game; oh, no, far from it.

After the game, Yankees manager Joe Girardi announced that Phil Hughes and his 4-13 record would go to the bullpen and that David Huff, who is 2-0 with an ERA of 0.60 over his past 15 innings, will go into the rotation and start during the upcoming four-game series with the Red Sox.

Kuroda overpowered by Rays

Hiroki Kuroda has picked up the Yankees all season. Now his teammates can pay him back by picking up the rest of this series for him. Kuroda simply was not himself Friday night in a 7-2 loss to the Rays that stifled the momentum the Yankees were thriving on after sweeping a four-game series from Toronto that alerted other contenders that they intend to be in the thick of the race for a postseason berth.

The Yankees came from behind in all four games against the Blue Jays, but there would be no heroics at Tropicana Field as the Rays kept hitting balls over the fences to push the Yankees further behind over the first five innings.

Kuroda gave the Yankees innings – six – and little else. The seven runs and the four home runs were the most allowed in a game this year by Kuroda, who has yielded 20 hits in his past 11 2/3 innings. The Yanks gave Kuroda a 1-0 lead in the first inning on a two-out, RBI single by Alfonso Soriano crossing up Rays manager Joe Maddon’s over-shift, but in the second the righthander was jolted by a three-run home run by Rays catcher Jose Lobaton that ended Kuroda’s homerless streak of 58 1/3 innings.

Tampa Bay kept it up with solo shots by Evan Longoria and Matt Joyce back-to-back in the third inning and Ben Zobrist leading off the fifth. Along the way, Lobaton picked up a fourth RBI on a single in the fourth. Kuroda entered the game leading the American League in earned run average but dropped into fifth place and surrendered the lead to the Tigers’ Anibal Sanchez.

The offensive surge was more than enough support for Chris Archer, another impressive young pitcher in the Rays’ corral who has been murder on the Yankees this year. The righthander held the Yankees to two runs, four hits and two walks with four strikeouts in seven innings to run his record against them this season to 3-0 with a 1.23 ERA. Archer, who pitched a two-hit shutout against the Yankees in his previous start against them July 27 at Yankee Stadium, became the first rookie pitcher to win three games against them in one season since 1989 by Kevin Brown, then with the Rangers.

The Yankees’ big bats were awfully quiet. Curtis Granderson, Robinson Cano, Soriano and Alex Rodriguez combined for that one hit by Soriano in 16 at-bats with three strikeouts. Leadoff man Brett Gardner had a hand – rather, legs – in scoring both the Yankees’ runs.

He led off the game with a walk, stole second, crossed to third on a deep flyout by Granderson and scored on the hit by Soriano. Gardner tripled leading off the fifth and scored on an infield out by Cano. Gardner suffered an embarrassing moment in the eighth, which he led off with an infield single, by getting picked off first base by reliever Jamey Wright.

So the five-game winning streak is over, but the Yankees still have a chance to win the series, which they have done in each of their past four series. Saturday night’s second game of the set pairs former AL Cy Young Award winners CC Sabathia and David Price. It will mark the ninth matchup between the two lefthanders. Price has had the upper hand in the rivalry with a 4-2 record and 2.52 ERA with the Rays winning six of the eight games.

Hughes loses to former teammate Kennedy

Phil Hughes was expected to benefit from pitching in spacious Petco Park Sunday in San Diego. It did not turn out that way.

The righthander entered the game with a 3-2 record and 3.02 ERA on the road this year compared to 1-7 with a 6.02 ERA at Yankee Stadium. He may have well been in the Bronx the way Sunday’s start turned out for Hughes, who was paired against former Yankees teammate Ian Kennedy.

Hughes and Kennedy came up through the Yankees’ system together and were even roommates at one time. Kennedy was traded to the Diamondbacks as part of the three-team deal that sent Curtis Granderson from Detroit to the Yankees. Hughes was an 18-game winner and an American League All-Star in 2010. Kennedy was a 21-game winner and finished fourth in National League Cy Young Award voting in 2011. Yet both were involved in trade rumors this year. Hughes remained with the Yankees while Kennedy was dealt from Arizona to San Diego.

Making his first start for the Padres Sunday, Kennedy outpitched Hughes, who did not survive the third inning and remained winless in five starts since July 2. He put the Yankees in a 5-0 hole by the third inning while Kennedy pitched into the sixth to end his own losing streak that had stretched to 10 starts since June 1 (0-5, five no-decisions) with the 6-3 victory that gave San Diego the series and sent Hughes’ personal record to 4-10 with a 4.87 ERA.

The Yankees have gone a month since they won a series. Sunday’s loss brought them perilously close to a double-digit deficit in the AL East standings. The Yankees trail the first-place Red Sox by 9 ½ games and remain three games out of third place.

Hughes gave up five earned runs, six hits and three walks (one intentional) with one strikeout in 2 2/3 innings, his second briefest outing of the season. The shortest was May 15 against the Mariners at the Stadium when he allowed seven earned runs and six hits in two-thirds of an inning. Hughes was not nearly that bad, but he continued to have trouble finishing off hitters. Three of the runs off him came after two were out.

Kennedy (4-8) held the Yankees scoreless until two out in the sixth when he gave up two walks and two singles in succession that netted two runs. Granderson, who reached base four times with three walks and a single, drove in one of the runs with that hit.

The Yankees made it 6-3 on Austin Romine’s first career home run, a solo shot to left-center in the seventh off righthander Dale Thayer, but could not get any closer. Romine did not get the ball as a souvenir because someone in the Padres bullpen where it landed tossed it into the stands. Romine has been a bright spot for the Yankees of late. In his past eight games, the backup catcher has hit .476 with four doubles, one home run, four RBI and four walks in 21 at-bats to lift his season batting average from .132 to .213.

The Yankees got the potential tying run to the plate in the ninth inning against Padres closer Huston Street (21 saves), but pinch hitter Vernon Wells struck out.

It was a day filled with bad news for the Yankees. An MRI on Derek Jeter’s troublesome right calf revealed a Grade 1 strain which may result with the captain going on the disabled list again. Also, pitcher Michael Pineda reported stiffness in his surgical right shoulder after his two-inning stint for Triple A Scranton Saturday night and may have to be shut down.

Jeter out of lineup with right leg issues

Derek Jeter’s move up the ladder of the all-time hits leaders will be stalled the rest of the weekend because of issues with his right calf and quadriceps. Jeter was not in Saturday night’s starting lineup for the Yankees against the Padres and he won’t be there again Sunday, either. With no designated hitter in place in a National League park, Yankees manager Joe Girardi had no way to get Jeter into the batting order.

Girardi commented after Friday night’s 7-2 loss that Jeter was not operating at 100 percent. The skipper said the right leg has been troubling Jeter since last Sunday when he came off the disabled list in dramatic fashion and hit a first-pitch home run in his first at-bat. Jeter started both games in Los Angeles earlier in the week but came out of the second game for a pinch runner.

Friday night, Jeter had a single in four at-bats, made an awkward slide into third base and committed a throwing error. Jeter said afterward that he was fine. Do you expect him to say anything otherwise? With 3,308 career hits, Jeter is five behind Eddie Collins (3,313) for ninth place on the career list and 11 back of Paul Molitor (3,319) for eighth place. DJ needs one more RBI to tie former teammate Bernie Williams for sixth place on the Yankees’ all-time list.

Eduardo Nunez, who made his first start of the season at third base Friday night, was back at shortstop in the Captain’s place Saturday night. Girardi said that Jeter could be used as a pinch hitter, but the manager sounded as if he preferred to avoid that. The Yankees move on to Chicago and American League rules Monday.

“I’m definitely giving it two days,” Girardi told reporters in San Diego. “My hope is that we don’t have to DL him. My goal is to get him back in there Monday, get him in there against the White Sox and see how he does.”

Cano knocked out of All-Star Game; Mo honored

How bad has the Yankees’ luck been this year? In terms of health, I mean. The disabled list has been almost as crowded as the dugout. Even in the All-Star Game, the Yankees could not stay healthy.

Robinson Cano, the American League second baseman and one of the few Yankees regulars to stay on the field all season, made an early exit Tuesday night from Citi Field. Cano, the second hitter in the AL order, came up after a leadoff double by the Angels’ Mike Trout and was struck on the side of his right knee by a 96-miles-per-hour fastball from Mets righthander Matt Harvey.

Cano winced in pain and tried to stay in the game. He went to first base but after Tigers third baseman Miguel Cabrera struck out Cano came off the field and was replaced by pinch runner Dustin Pedroia of the Red Sox. As Cano walked off the field, he had a friendly exchange with Harvey.

“He said, ‘My bad,’ ” Cano said. “I said, ‘No problem.’ I know he don’t want to hit nobody. It’s part of the game, so what can you do?”

This is just what the Yankees did not need. Managers across baseball watch the All-Star Game with trepidation and hope one of their players does not get hurt. Harvey, the National League starting pitcher who pitched two scoreless innings, said, “I feel bad. I didn’t mean to hit Cano.”

X-rays on Cano’s knee were negative.

“It’s a little tight, but I’m walking good,” Cano said. “You want to play the game and enjoy the nice city in New York with the fans, but that’s part of life. Got to get it better and take it easy. Yeah, I’ll be good for Friday.”

“Obviously, the last thing I wanted to do was go out there and possibly injure somebody,” Harvey said. “As [Cano] was walking by, I was trying to get his attention as he was going to first. He then came off the field, and I apologized and made sure that he was okay. I think he understood that it wasn’t intentional.”

Cano had been enjoying himself at the All-Star Game as opposed to a year ago at Kansas City when he was the target of booing from local fans because as captain of the AL Home Run Derby squad he did not name the Royals’ Billy Butler to the team. Cano got revenge Monday night as a player he promoted for the Home Run Derby team even though he was not on the All-Star squad, Athletics outfielder Yoenis Cespedes, won the competition.

Not surprisingly considering the Yankees-Mets rivalry, Cano was booed by most people in the Citi Field crowd in pregame introductions. Conversely, Mariano Rivera was accorded a healthy ovation. In a lot of ways, Mo is his generation’s Yogi Berra, the one Yankee that even fans who hate the Yankees like.

The best was yet to come for Mo. To guarantee that Rivera would pitch in the game, AL manager Jim Leyland of the Tigers put him in the game in the eighth inning. After all, if the NL had gone ahead in the bottom of the eighth and held the lead then there would have been no bottom of the ninth.

Rivera was treated with another standing ovation as he trotted to the mound to his usual entrance song, “Enter Sandman,” by Metallica. When he reached the rubber, Rivera was the only player on the field as the players from both sides stood on the top steps of the dugouts and joined the crowd in showing their appreciation to the game’s all-time saves leader who is calling it a career at the end of this season at the age of 43.

It was quite a sight. Mo acknowledged the applause by removing his cap and waving to each portion of the crowd. Mariano retired the side in order and was given the game ball by first baseman Prince Fielder after the third out of the inning. It was a more pleasant final appearance at Citi Field than the May 28 Subway Series game when he sustained his first blown save of the season in a stunning loss to the Mets.

Mo Mariano Rivera (USA Today photo)

“I wanted to pitch in the game and in baseball anything can happen,” Rivera said of pitching in the eighth instead of the ninth. “The plan worked out perfectly. This was right up there with winning the World Series. To do this in New York with all the fans here and all the players and the coaches and the managers standing in the dugouts. . .that was priceless.”

There turned out to be a bottom of the ninth inning as the AL had a 3-0 lead. Rangers closer Joe Nathan worked the ninth and can always say he earned a save in a game after Mariano Rivera had pitched, which had not happened since 1996 when Mo was the setup man for Yanks closer John Wetteland.

Rivera was voted the Ted Williams All-Star Game Most Valuable Player and was able to thank the fans and told them it was a “privilege” to pitch in front of them all these years. Let’s face it, fans, the privilege was ours to watch him.

YU members may ask D-Rob a question & vote

Got a question for David Robertson? As an exclusive membership benefit, Yankees Universe members are being given the opportunity to ask the Yankees reliever a question. Just hit the “Ask Joe a Question Now” link.

The Yankees will randomly select questions and conduct an interview with Robertson. The answers will be posted on the members-only section of yankees.com. Please submit your question by 5 p.m. Thursday, July 18.

While you’re at it, you can hit the “Vote for David Now” link to support his candidacy in the All-Star Game American League Final Vote competition among five players seeking the last spot on the roster for the July 16 game at Citi Field.

With one day remaining, Robertson is still in second place in the balloting. Beginning at 10 a.m. Thursday, you can use the hashtag #HighSocksForVotes on Twitter. Each hashtag will then count as a vote. You can still vote on yankees.com and mlb.com. The Nationals are supporting Robertson, and the Yankees are supporting Washington shortstop Ian Desmond in the National League Final Vote voting. Desmond wore his socks high last night in honor of D-Rob:

Desmond

The Yankees are encouraging everyone to vote for Desmond #DesiIn13 as well. Voting ends at 4 p.m. Thursday.

Pettitte roughed up by former team

The Astros, appearing at Yankee Stadium as an American League team for the first time, had a rude welcome Monday night for former teammate Andy Pettitte. Houston stunned the crowd with a three-run rally in the first inning after two were out.

Pettitte spent three seasons (2004-06) with the Astros before returning to the Yankees in 2007. In his only previous start against Houston June 11, 2010, Pettitte earned his 200th career victory. Recent call-up Austin Romine got his first start of the season behind the plate for Pettitte.

The noise began off Pettitte with a two-out single to center by Brandon Laird, who got into 25 games for the Yankees in 2011, the year that Pettitte retired from the game only to come back to the Yankees the following season. Chris Carter singled sharply to left, which brought up Pettitte nemesis Carlos Pena.

You would think that a free-swinging, left-handed batter like Pena would be a pigeon against the left-handed Pettitte. Not so. Pena took a .326 batting average with six home runs in 43 career at-bats against Pettitte into the first-inning plate appearance and improved on it with a line single to right for Houston’s first run.

Andy continued to struggle as he walked Ronny Cedeno on four pitches, which loaded the bases. Carlos Corporan, the Houston catcher, drove in two more runs with a double to right. Even the third out of the inning, a liner to shortstop by Matt Dominguez, was well-struck. Pettitte got off to a shaky start in the second when he hit Robbie Grossman with a pitch, but that was rectified when Jose Altuve grounded into a double play.

Pena struck again in the third with two out as he tripled off the center-field wall. It was his third career triple in 45 at-bats off Pettitte and raised his career average against him to .356. Pena was stranded, however, as Cedeno flied out to left to end the inning.

If most of these Astros names sound unfamiliar, you are not alone. Houston has the lowest payroll in the league and entered the game with a 7-18 record, the worst in the AL. The Astros did not look that bad against Pettitte. They scored two more two-out runs in the fourth inning on successive, RBI doubles by Altuve and Brandon Barnes. Pettitte had not allowed more than three runs in any of his previous four starts.

He departed in the fifth after giving up a one-out double to Cedeno on a ball that hit the third base bag, hopped over Jayson Nix and down the left field line. Both runners Pettitte left on base upon his departure ended up scoring on a wild pitch by Adam Warren and a two-run homer by Corporan, who had four of the Astros’ 17 hits in their 9-1 victory.

“I don’t know if I’ve ever seen him without his slider,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “That’s a swing-and-miss pitch for him, but it wasn’t there for him.”

“Not to give us a chance to win this game makes me sick to my stomach,” Pettitte said.

Pettitte’s ERA grew from 2.22 to 3.86. It was that kind of night for Andy.

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