Results tagged ‘ CC Sabathia ’

Beltran aching but not hurt seriously

The Yankees were relieved that an MRI exam of Carlos Beltran’s left shoulder and right wrist came back negative. Just to be cautious, manager Joe Girardi kept Beltran on the bench Friday night.

The right fielder tumbled over a fence in foul territory down the right field line while chasing a fly ball in Thursday night’s 10-2 victory over the Rays at St. Petersburg, Fla. Beltran remained in the game but said Friday that his shoulder and wrist were sore. Ichiro Suzuki played right field despite Tampa Bay starting a lefthander, Eric Bedard.

Beltran is expected to play again Saturday night. Also out of the lineup despite a three-hit game (single, double, triple) Thursday night was Brian Roberts. Girardi said he wanted to keep Roberts, who has had back soreness recently, off the artificial surface at Tropicana Field for at least one of the four games scheduled there this weekend.

The triple play turned by the Yankees in the second inning Thursday night was the 24th in franchise history and their third over the past five seasons, all with CC Sabathia on the mound. Third baseman Yangervis Solarte started the triple killing by fielding a ground ball by Sean Rodriguez, tagging third and throwing to Roberts at second for the second out. Roberts’ relay to first was in the dirt but picked out by Scott Sizemore, who was playing the position for the first time in the major leagues.

The Yankees’ previous triple play was April 12, 2013 at Yankee Stadium against the Orioles. It was a wild play with three of the four infielders — second baseman Robinson Cano, third baseman Kevin Youkilis and shortstop Derek Jeter — each touching the ball twice. The first baseman who got the assist on the third out was Lyle Overbay.

Cano, third baseman Alex Rodriguez and first baseman Nick Johnson collaborated on a triple play behind Sabathia April 22, 2010 at Oakland. That ended a 42-year drought between triple plays for the Yankees. Their previous one before then was June 3, 1968 by pitcher Dooley Womack, third baseman Bobby Cox and first baseman Mickey Mantle against the Twins at the Stadium.

Yanks make Price pay this time

David Price usually has the edge over CC Sabathia whenever the former American League Cy Young Award winners face each other, but that was not the case Thursday night. The Yankees punished Price for past losses and gave Sabathia all the offense a pitcher could want in a 10-2 victory.

Price lasted only five innings and was mugged for 10 hits — six for extra bases — as the Yankees hit for the cycle against him. There were doubles by Scott Sizemore, Yangervis Solarte, Brian Roberts and Derek Jeter, triples by Roberts and Jacoby Ellsbury and home runs by Alfonso Soriano and Brian McCann to send Price, the 2012 AL Cy Young Award winner, to his first loss of the season.

Price entered the game with a 6-1 record and 2.41 ERA in his pairings with Sabathia. That ERA climbed to 3.06 after the Yankees banged him around this time. It was also the first time since he won the AL Cy Young Award in 2012 that Price lost a game against a former Cy Young winner. He had defeated R.A. Dickey twice and Tim Lincecum and Sabathia once apiece prior to Thursday night’s loss.

Sabathia, the AL Cy Young Award winner with the Indians in 2007, stayed out of the one big, bad inning that had characterized earlier starts. His teammates in the infield kept a potential big inning from developing in the second by pulling off a triple play.

The Rays’ first run off Sabathia was not earned due to a passed ball by Brian McCann. CC gave up a home run to Sean Rodriguez leading off the seventh, which turned out to be the big lefthander’s last inning. He scattered six other hits, walked two and struck out six to even his 2014 record at 2-2.

CC has had a tough go of it against Tampa Bay. Thursday night’s victory improved his career mark against the Rays to 12-13 and 4-8 at Tropicana Field. Since joining the Yankees, Sabathia’s record against the Rays is 5-12.

The Yankees’ fifth straight victory followed Wednesday’s sweep of a split-admission doubleheader in which they blanked the Cubs, 3-0 and 2-0, the first time in 26 years that a major-league club won both ends of a twin bill by shutouts since the Twins won, 11-0 and 5-0, May 6, 1988 at Oakland. The previous time the Yankees did it was April 19, 1987 over the Royals, 5-0 and 1-0.

Solarte had another big night, climaxed by his first major-league home run, off Grant Balfour in the ninth inning. Solarte also doubled and singled and started the triple play.

Roberts, who entered the game mired in a 1-for-25 slump and having missed three games with back issues, had a triple, a double and a single and drove in two runs. Soriano also had three hits with Ellsbury, Jeter and McCann adding two apiece in the 16-hit onslaught.

Yankees triple their pleasure behind CC

There are probably hundreds of first basemen in major league history who were never part of a triple play. Getting an inning’s full compliment of outs on a single play is rare. But there was Scott Sizemore in his first career game as a first baseman Thursday night completing a triple killing that was the third turned behind CC Sabathia over the past five seasons.

Sizemore, who does not even own a first baseman’s glove, played a major part in the triple play that wiped out a potential Tampa Bay rally in the second inning. Sabathia was working with a 4-0 lead but got into trouble when Evan Longoria doubled to right-center and Wil Myers walked.

Sean Rodriguez followed with a grounder down the third base line. Yangervis Solarte gloved it a foot from the bag, stepped on it and fired to second baseman Brian Roberts for the force there. Roberts’ relay was in the dirt, but Sizemore made a fine scoop to complete the trip-up. He made the play wearing Kelly Johnson’s glove. Manager Joe Girardi went with Sizemore at first base to get another right-handed bat into the lineup against Price, a move that paid off. Sizemore doubled leading off the top of the second and scored on a triple by Roberts, who was back in the lineup after missing three games because of lower-back stiffness.

One out later, Jacoby Ellsbury also tripled. This inning was all about triples one way or the other. Derek Jeter made it 4-0 with a single to center off a two-strike slider from Price, who was not as formidable as he often has been against the Yankees.

The Yanks are hoping the first-base situation will clear up perhaps as early as Sunday when Teixeira could return from the disabled list. Tex is working out in the extended spring program at Tampa, just across the Bay from Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg.

The Yankees got a scare in the third inning when Carlos Beltran toppled over a fence down the right field line chasing a foul ball by Desmond Jennings. Beltran apparently landed safely because he climbed back over the wall and continued playing. With the Cardinals in the World Series last year, Beltran fell into the bullpen at Fenway Park. Beltran has got to familiarize himself with American League yards.

McCann thwarts Maddon’s strategy

Yes!

Give Brian McCann a hearty cheer.

The catcher got the Yankees off to a quick, 1-0 lead in the first inning Thursday night at Tropicana Field by crossing up Rays manager Joe Maddon’s over-shift with a line single to left field, a big, two-out hit that gave CC Sabathia a run before he took the mound against longtime nemesis David Price.

Regular readers are probably weary of listening to me moan about hitters not taking what the defenses are giving them. More than any other manager Maddon has made use of the infamous Boudreau Shift to thwart dead-pull hitters.

The macho mentality that exists today among hitters is such that many believe it is cheap to hit the ball the other way and take advantage of an empty portion of the field for a single. They would rather try for home runs and simply hit into an area filled with fielders.

Ken Singleton of the YES Network pointed out during McCann’s at-bat in the first inning that he watched the catcher take batting practice and noticed him hitting balls to the left side frequently. Taking that approach into the game, McCann came up with two out and runners on first and second and punched Price’s first pitch on a line over the vacated shortstop spot and into left field for a run-scoring single.

Very nice to see.

One bad inning sinks Sabathia

For five innings Friday night, CC Sabathia was pitching as the ace that Yankees fans have come to appreciate. With a fastball that was in the 90-miles-per-hour range and a devastating slider, the big lefthander held the Red Sox in check. He limited them to one hit and two walks, struck out six batters and got eight other outs in the infield.

It was not vintage Sabathia from his Cy Young Award days when the fastball was more muscular, but it was a cagier and slyer Sabathia who had Boston hitters guessing and oft times wrong. The lone hit to that point was a leadoff double by Red Sox catcher David Ross in the third inning. Sabathia retired the next three batters on ground balls to prevent Ross from scoring.

Then came the sixth inning, and everything went wrong for the big guy. Jonny Gomes led off with a home run off a 1-0 fastball that tied the score. Alfonso Soriano had given CC a 1-0 lead in the second inning with a home run off Jon Lester.

After striking out Dustin Pedroia, Sabathia gave up a single to David Ortiz on an excuse-me, half-swing of a dribbler to the vacated left side of the infield as the Yankees were employing an over-shift on Big Papi. Mike Napoli singled on a soft line drove to center field, but there was nothing soft about Grady Sizemore’s drive off a hanging slider on 0-1 that reached the second deck in right field for a demoralizing, three-run homer.

“I thought he had good command and threw the ball decent,” manager Joe Girardi said of Sabathia. “He hung a slider, and Sizemore did not miss it. One pitch in a tight game sometimes it’s going to beat you.”

No one welcomed the offensive display more than Lester, who before that inning had watched his teammates score merely one run in his first 19 1/3 innings on the mound this year, which explains why he entered the game with a record of 0-2 despite a 2.51 ERA.

The Yankees tried to get Sabathia off the hook with a two-out rally in the seventh but got only one run on a Kelly Johnson single that chased Lester.

Sabathia’s ERA actually came down from 7.50 but is still an unseemly 6.63 after three starts as his record fell to 1-2. His nine strikeouts lifted his total with the Yankees to 1,017, which moved him past Roger Clemens into 10th place on the franchise’s career list. Next up in ninth place at 1,028 is Al Downing.

Yankees take control in first inning

It was a positive sign for the Yankees to break out of the gate early Sunday. They had been pushed around in first innings to the tune of 7-2 in the first five games of the season. Sunday at Toronto, they gave CC Sabathia a 3-0 lead before he took the mound even though they had only one hit in the first inning.

That hit was a two-out, two-run double by Kelly Johnson that climaxed a rally fueled by two walks and a hit batter off Drew Hutchison, who had pitched 5 1/3 scoreless innings in a winning first start last week.

The Blue Jays answered back with a run in the bottom of the first on a leadoff home run by Melky Cabrera, the third homer of the series for the former Yankees outfielder. Sabathia had given up four runs in the first inning in his Opening Day start last week at Houston.

Derek Jeter made history with a leadoff single in the third inning. It was career hit No. 3,319 for DJ, who tied Hall of Famer Paul Molitor for eighth place on the all-time list. Jeter moved past Molitor with a single in the fourth for No. 3,320.

“To have the most hits for the most prestigious franchise in professional sports is pretty special,” Molitor told me back in 2011 when Jeter reached 3,000 hits. “Getting 3,000 hits is as much a product of longevity as ability. If Derek stays healthy, he has a good chance to rack up a lot more hits.”

Rookie infielder Yangervis Solarte has multi-hit games in each of his first three career starts to become the first Yankees player to accomplish the feat since Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio from May 3-6, 1936 (also three games), according to the Elias Sport Bureau. Solarte entered play leading the Yankees in hits (7), doubles (3), extra-base hits (3), RBI (4), on-base percentage (.600), slugging percentage (.769) and OPS (1.369).

Solarte picked up his fourth double and fifth RBI of the season with one out in the fourth and then scored on the Yankees’ first home run of the season. Brett Gardner ended the drought with a drive to right off a 3-2 pitch that chased Hutchison.

No chance for closer in this opener

None of us expected the Yankees to go 162-0 this year, but the 6-2 loss in Tuesday night’s season opener to the lowly Astros started things off with a thud. The Yanks were six runs in the hole after the first two innings and while Houston was shut out the rest of the way the Yankees could not climb out of it.

A surprisingly effective Scott Feldman took a one-hit shutout into the seventh for the Astros, who won only 51 games last year. A sellout crowd of 42,117 at Minute Maid Park that included Hall of Famers Reggie Jackson and Nolan Ryan and former President George H.W. Bush witnessed another dismal Opening Day effort by CC Sabathia.

The trimmed-down lefthander admitted afterward that his motor was running a bit too much early on as the Astros jumped him for six runs and six hits, including home runs by those household names Jesus Guzman and L.J. Hoes, in the first two frames. Sabathia eventually settled down and allowed only two singles over the next five innings long after the barn door was closed.

Opening Day has seldom gone smoothly for Sabathia, whose career mark in lid-lifters is 1-3 with a 6.17 ERA. With the Yankees, CC has been even worse in Opening Day starts — 0-3 with a 7.17 ERA.

The Yankees escaped first-inning scares when Derek Jeter and Brian McCann sustained hand injuries that turned out minor. Jeter had one of the Yankees’ six hits. So did McCann, who drove in his first run with his team team with a single in the seventh. Mark Teixeira followed with an RBI single to left crossing up an over-shift, which was a good sign.

Jeter and Teixeira were hurt at this time a year ago and with all the newcomers Brett Gardner was the only player other than Sabathia from the 2013 opener in the starting lineup. New right fielder Carlos Beltran had the Yankees’ first hit, a single in the fourth. New center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury reached base once in five plate appearances with a walk.

There certainly was not much to write home about. Dellin Betances may have been the highlight for the Yankees with a scoreless inning of two-strikeout relief. With David Robertson succeeding the retired Mariano Rivera in the closer role, there is the need for a setup reliever to emerge. Betances worked the seventh inning in the opener but continued impressive work could move him into the setup picture.

There would be no save opportunity for D-Rob in this one, however.

Stumbling out of the gate

After the first inning Tuesday night at Houston, the Yankees had nowhere to go but up. A nasty omen was Derek Jeter, who became the first player to appear in 20 seasons for the Yankees, getting hit in the left hand by a pitch from Scott Feldman. DJ took his base and later his position in the field as the Yankees breathed a huge sigh of relief.

The more damaging hits were by the Astros off CC Sabathia in the bottom half of the first. The big lefthander’s decreasing velocity last year and again this spring has been a cause of concern for the Yankees. With a fastball barely clicking 90 mph on the radar gun, Sabathia was roughed up for four runs.

A leadoff double by Dexter Fowler set the tone. Jose Altuve singled Fowler home and promptly stole second base. A wild pitch by Sabathia proved damaging as Altuve crossed to third from where he scored on a fielder’s choice. Mark Teixeira’s throw to the plate left something to be desired as the Yankees looked out of synch.

Jesus Guzman then crushed a first-pitch fastball to left for a two-run home run. CC was touched for a leadoff homer in the second by L.J. Hoes and another run on yet another combination of a Fowler double and Altuve single. The Yankees did not get their first hit until Carlos Beltran singled to left with one out in the fourth.

Sabathia missed latest date with Price

CC Sabathia’s hamstring injury that has terminated the season prevented another matchup against the Rays’ David Price. The two former Cy Young Award winners have been paired against each other on a regular basis.

Sabathia’s last start was Friday night at Yankee Stadium against the Giants in which he pitched seven innings plus one batter and got the victory thanks to Alex Rodriguez’s record 24th career grand slam that unlocked a 1-1 score in the bottom of the seventh. CC somehow pitched into the eighth inning despite straining his left hammy in the second inning.

Had he not been hurt and stayed on turn in the rotation, Sabathia would have been scheduled to start for the Yankees Wednesday night against Tampa Bay and his fellow lefthander. Perhaps CC would just as soon avoid Price, whose most recent victory was Aug. 24 against Sabathia and the Yankees at Tropicana Field.

It was the ninth time Price and Sabathia squared off against each other. The Rays have won eight of those games with Price putting up a 6-1 record and 2.68 ERA in 59 2/3 innings. Nine of his 20 career starts against the Yankees have come against Sabathia.

Sabathia vows to come back strong in 2014

The Yankees’ slim hopes of making the playoffs have been dealt a further blow with the loss of CC Sabathia for the remainder of the season. He sustained a Grade 2 left hamstring strain, which requires a recovery time of eight weeks, during Friday night’s 5-1 victory over the Giants. The amazing part is that Sabathia felt the strain as early as the second inning and still he pitched into the eighth and after the game told manager Joe Girardi he expected to make his next start. That was the adrenalin talking, of course. Once the strain was discovered, Sabathia was shut down for the rest of the way.

“It’s frustrating,” Sabathia said. “It came at a time when I felt I was going in the right direction.”

The 2013 season was something of a roller coaster for Sabathia, who finished with a 14-13 record and a 4.78 ERA, the highest of his career. The lefthander did not mince words when summing up his season.

“I had a bad year,” he said.

Well, that’s a bit harsh. What Sabathia had was an inconsistent season, one in which he could not take success from start to start as he had in the past during a career that included his winning the American League Cy Young Award in 2006 with the Indians and in five years with the Yankees that included an World Series championship in 2009.

“I didn’t grind it out the way I have in the past,” he said. “I gave up too many leads. Our guys would come back against a good pitcher, and I’d give back the lead the next inning. If I could have given Hiro [Hiroki Kuroda] more help, we’d be in a better position than we are now.”

In that last sentence, Sabathia acknowledged that he lost the staff ace designation to Kuroda at some point during the season, a position he hopes to regain in 2014.

“I had different issues; it wasn’t just one thing,” he said. “Earlier in the year, it was arm angle, not getting my elbow up. Another part of it was being stubborn, not wanting to change. I was never one to look at videos. I had to change my approach and started doing that to study hitters’ tendencies. I fell into a pattern where I was pitching people the same way. My preparation for the game needs to be better. I felt like I let my teammates down this year. I intend to work hard over the winter and next spring to go back to being the pitcher I was when I signed here.”

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