Results tagged ‘ Cy Young Award ’

Tanaka sustains first severe setback with elbow pain

How many Yankees found themselves over the course of the first portion of the 2014 season asking this question:

“Where would be without Masahiro Tanaka?”

Let’s hope we don’t have to find that out. Yankees Universe held a collective breath Wednesday with the news that Tanaka returned to New York to have an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) exam on his right elbow after complaining of soreness there during the Yankees’ 5-3 loss Tuesday night at Cleveland. Tanaka allowed five runs and 10 hits, both season highs against him, in 6 2/3 innings.

For the time being, the Yankees are terming the injury right elbow inflammation. He was placed on the 15-day disabled list, which now makes four-fifths of the Opening Day rotation on the DL. Ivan Nova is lost for the entire season. CC Sabathia may be also, and Michael Pineda won’t likely be back before August. Hiroki Kuroda, the only member of the Opening Day rotation still a member of the starting unit, better not walk under any ladders.

It is not yet time for Yankees fans to push the panic button despite the dire news. The club won’t know for sure what Tanaka’s issue is until the MRI is studied. The problem is that Dr. Chris Ahmad, the team physician, is attending a major orthopedist convention in Seattle, the same one that has prevented the noted surgeon Dr. James Andrews from examining Sabathia’s ailing right knee to determine if surgery is required.

Tanaka’s next scheduled start was to have been Sunday night at Baltimore, the Yankees’ final game before the All-Star break. The righthander was selected for the American League squad but was not expected to pitch in the game because of the Sunday start. It is unclear now whether he will go to Minneapolis for the game. The AL has replaced him on the roster with Red Sox reliever Koji Uehara, which stinks. It should have been David Robertson.

That is the least of the Yankees’ concern at this point. Tanaka, their prize signing in the past off-season, had proved to be every bit as effective on this side of the Pacific Ocean as he was back home in Japan where he was 24-0 last year.

In his first 14 starts for the Yankees, Tanaka was 11-1 with two no-decisions and a 1.99 ERA. He has come down to Earth somewhat in the past four starts in which he is 1-3 with a 4.25 ERA. Tanaka has nonetheless placed himself in contention for the AL Cy Young and Jackie Robinson Rookie of the Year Awards by leading the league in victories with his 12-4 record, tied for first in complete games with three and ranking second in ERA at 2.51.

Now it is matter of watch and wait to see how serious the injury to Tanaka is. As for the answer to that question, well, figure it out: the Yankees were 13-5 in games started by Tanaka and 31-39 in games started by everyone else.

One bad inning sinks Sabathia

For five innings Friday night, CC Sabathia was pitching as the ace that Yankees fans have come to appreciate. With a fastball that was in the 90-miles-per-hour range and a devastating slider, the big lefthander held the Red Sox in check. He limited them to one hit and two walks, struck out six batters and got eight other outs in the infield.

It was not vintage Sabathia from his Cy Young Award days when the fastball was more muscular, but it was a cagier and slyer Sabathia who had Boston hitters guessing and oft times wrong. The lone hit to that point was a leadoff double by Red Sox catcher David Ross in the third inning. Sabathia retired the next three batters on ground balls to prevent Ross from scoring.

Then came the sixth inning, and everything went wrong for the big guy. Jonny Gomes led off with a home run off a 1-0 fastball that tied the score. Alfonso Soriano had given CC a 1-0 lead in the second inning with a home run off Jon Lester.

After striking out Dustin Pedroia, Sabathia gave up a single to David Ortiz on an excuse-me, half-swing of a dribbler to the vacated left side of the infield as the Yankees were employing an over-shift on Big Papi. Mike Napoli singled on a soft line drove to center field, but there was nothing soft about Grady Sizemore’s drive off a hanging slider on 0-1 that reached the second deck in right field for a demoralizing, three-run homer.

“I thought he had good command and threw the ball decent,” manager Joe Girardi said of Sabathia. “He hung a slider, and Sizemore did not miss it. One pitch in a tight game sometimes it’s going to beat you.”

No one welcomed the offensive display more than Lester, who before that inning had watched his teammates score merely one run in his first 19 1/3 innings on the mound this year, which explains why he entered the game with a record of 0-2 despite a 2.51 ERA.

The Yankees tried to get Sabathia off the hook with a two-out rally in the seventh but got only one run on a Kelly Johnson single that chased Lester.

Sabathia’s ERA actually came down from 7.50 but is still an unseemly 6.63 after three starts as his record fell to 1-2. His nine strikeouts lifted his total with the Yankees to 1,017, which moved him past Roger Clemens into 10th place on the franchise’s career list. Next up in ninth place at 1,028 is Al Downing.

Ironic that Indians should eliminate Yankees

Go back to early April in Cleveland and who would have thought the season would end the way it has for the two clubs on the field in two games at Progressive Field? The Yankees outscored the Indians, 25-7, in those games. Cleveland fans treated former Tribesman Travis Hafner to a standing ovation for his past service as the Yankees newest designated hitter was well on his way to a very productive first month of the season. Many folks in the media were wondering if Terry Francona did a smart thing in going back to the dugout with that franchise.

It just shows how much things can change in six months. The Yankees were eliminated from the race for a postseason berth Wednesday night while the Indians were still in line for a shot at their first postseason appearance in six years. Cleveland still has to fight off the challenges of Texas and Kansas City but no longer has the Yankees to worry about.

The Yanks’ tragic number for elimination was down to one entering play Wednesday night. One more loss or one more Indians victory would knock the Yankees out of the playoff picture. As it turned out, both results happened. The Indians beat the White Sox, 7-2, to eliminate the Yankees, who lost a few minutes later to the Rays, 8-3.

In head-to-head competition, the Yankees were clearly superior to Cleveland this year. They won six of the seven games between them and outscored the Tribe, 49-19. The Yankees batted .295 with 13 home runs and 46 RBI against the Indians and averaged seven runs per game. Yankees pitchers combined for a 2.71 ERA in limiting the Indians to a .205 batting average and 2.71 runs per game.

But over the course of the entire season against all levels of competition, the Yankees finished behind the Indians. For all their success against Cleveland, the Yankees were done in by failing to beat inferior teams when it counted. Losing two of three at San Diego followed by getting swept by the White Sox at Chicago last month was a bad sign. Losing all four games this year to the Mets certainly hurt. And earlier this month after giving fans encouragement by winning three of four games at Baltimore, the Yankees were swept by the American League East winning Red Sox at Boston and then, even worse, dropped two of three to the last-place Blue Jays at Toronto.

Matters did not improve when the Yankees came home. They held the Giants to three runs total in three games but did not sweep the series, which was a must. Tampa Bay beat the Yanks each of the past two nights. Do not expect a spring-training lineup from the Yankees in the final home game of the season Thursday night.

“We have a responsibility to baseball,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said.

What he meant is that the Rays have not yet clinched a postseason berth, so for the sake of the Rangers and the Indians Girardi will field a representative lineup. Whether it will include Alex Rodriguez or not remains to be seen. He was lifted for a pinch hitter, Ichiro Suzuki, in the eighth inning and complained of sore legs.

Phil Hughes (4-14) lasted four batters into the third inning and was hung with another loss, his 10th in 11 decisions at Yankee Stadium this year. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, Hughes’ 1-10 mark in 16 home starts made him only the second pitcher in major league history to win fewer than two home games in a season in which he made at least 15 starts at his home yard. The other was the Blue Jays’ Phil Huffman, who was 1-9 in 16 starts at Exhibition Stadium in 1979.

Evan Longoria whacked two home runs and David DeJesus one in a 15-hit Tampa Bay attack that supported last year’s AL Cy Young Award winner, David Price (9-8). Say this for Yankees fans. They were on their feet and applauding during an eighth-inning rally despite their team trailing by five runs.

Thursday night will mark the final Stadium appearance by Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte. Mo will almost certainly get in the game regardless of the score. He is hoping for one more save situation. So are all of us.

Sabathia missed latest date with Price

CC Sabathia’s hamstring injury that has terminated the season prevented another matchup against the Rays’ David Price. The two former Cy Young Award winners have been paired against each other on a regular basis.

Sabathia’s last start was Friday night at Yankee Stadium against the Giants in which he pitched seven innings plus one batter and got the victory thanks to Alex Rodriguez’s record 24th career grand slam that unlocked a 1-1 score in the bottom of the seventh. CC somehow pitched into the eighth inning despite straining his left hammy in the second inning.

Had he not been hurt and stayed on turn in the rotation, Sabathia would have been scheduled to start for the Yankees Wednesday night against Tampa Bay and his fellow lefthander. Perhaps CC would just as soon avoid Price, whose most recent victory was Aug. 24 against Sabathia and the Yankees at Tropicana Field.

It was the ninth time Price and Sabathia squared off against each other. The Rays have won eight of those games with Price putting up a 6-1 record and 2.68 ERA in 59 2/3 innings. Nine of his 20 career starts against the Yankees have come against Sabathia.

A-Rod helps Yankees to a ‘grand’ victory

The Yankees keep coming off the mat. After a 4-6 trip that included two losses in three games to the last-place Blue Jays, the Yankees opened the final homestand of the season in a big way with a 5-1 victory over the Giants, who are trying to stay out of last place the year after winning the World Series.

The matchup of a pair of former Cy Young Award winners, CC Sabathia and Tim Lincecum, had the potential to be a riveting a game, which it was for six innings. The Yankees broke it open in the bottom of the seventh on a record-breaking grand slam by Alex Rodriguez. Lincecum was out of the game by then, but he had put the three runners A-Rod drove home on base. Hitting Brendan Ryan with a pitch was a huge blunder by Lincecum. Third baseman Pablo Sandoval’s failure to complete a double play on a grounder to third by J.R. Murphy kept the inning alive, and Lincecum dug himself in deeper by walking Ichiro Suzuki.

Giants manager Bruce Bochy replaced Lincecum at that point by George Kontos, who may be a familiar name to Yankees fans. The righthander was the Yankees’ fifth-round draft choice out of Northwestern University in 2006 and pitched in seven games for them in 2011. He went to the Giants in April 2012 in the trade for catcher Chris Stewart.

Rodriguez, who had one hit in his previous 25 at-bats, was certainly overdue. He batted. 182 on the trip but did have two home runs. A-Rod drove a 2-1 fastball to right field that made a 1-1 game 5-1 Yankees lead that held up in the steady hands of David Robertson in the eighth and Mariano Rivera in a non-save situation in the ninth.

The 654th career home run for Rodriguez was his 24th with the bases loaded. That broke the tie he had for most grand slams with Lou Gehrig. This was one of those records I thought when I was a kid would never be broken.

Of course, I thought the same thing about Gehrig’s streak of 2,130 games, Babe Ruth’s home run records for one season (60) and career (714), Ty Cobb’s stolen-base marks for one season (96) and career (897), Cobb’s career standard for hits (4,189) and George Sisler’s mark for hits in a season (257).

They are all gone.

This was a record set not in some obscure game in the middle of the season but during a game in the last week for a team that is trying to win a playoff spot under increasingly difficult odds.

Sabathia bounced back after two straight losses with one of his best games of the season. This was a tight game for nearly all the time he was in it. He gave up seven hits and three walks but was helped by a couple of double plays. The Yanks turned a third double play in the eighth behind Robertson after he entered the game following a leadoff single off Sabathia.

The Yankees still need some help from other teams to make their way through this wild-card maize, but for one night at least they helped themselves.

Kuroda overpowered by Rays

Hiroki Kuroda has picked up the Yankees all season. Now his teammates can pay him back by picking up the rest of this series for him. Kuroda simply was not himself Friday night in a 7-2 loss to the Rays that stifled the momentum the Yankees were thriving on after sweeping a four-game series from Toronto that alerted other contenders that they intend to be in the thick of the race for a postseason berth.

The Yankees came from behind in all four games against the Blue Jays, but there would be no heroics at Tropicana Field as the Rays kept hitting balls over the fences to push the Yankees further behind over the first five innings.

Kuroda gave the Yankees innings – six – and little else. The seven runs and the four home runs were the most allowed in a game this year by Kuroda, who has yielded 20 hits in his past 11 2/3 innings. The Yanks gave Kuroda a 1-0 lead in the first inning on a two-out, RBI single by Alfonso Soriano crossing up Rays manager Joe Maddon’s over-shift, but in the second the righthander was jolted by a three-run home run by Rays catcher Jose Lobaton that ended Kuroda’s homerless streak of 58 1/3 innings.

Tampa Bay kept it up with solo shots by Evan Longoria and Matt Joyce back-to-back in the third inning and Ben Zobrist leading off the fifth. Along the way, Lobaton picked up a fourth RBI on a single in the fourth. Kuroda entered the game leading the American League in earned run average but dropped into fifth place and surrendered the lead to the Tigers’ Anibal Sanchez.

The offensive surge was more than enough support for Chris Archer, another impressive young pitcher in the Rays’ corral who has been murder on the Yankees this year. The righthander held the Yankees to two runs, four hits and two walks with four strikeouts in seven innings to run his record against them this season to 3-0 with a 1.23 ERA. Archer, who pitched a two-hit shutout against the Yankees in his previous start against them July 27 at Yankee Stadium, became the first rookie pitcher to win three games against them in one season since 1989 by Kevin Brown, then with the Rangers.

The Yankees’ big bats were awfully quiet. Curtis Granderson, Robinson Cano, Soriano and Alex Rodriguez combined for that one hit by Soriano in 16 at-bats with three strikeouts. Leadoff man Brett Gardner had a hand – rather, legs – in scoring both the Yankees’ runs.

He led off the game with a walk, stole second, crossed to third on a deep flyout by Granderson and scored on the hit by Soriano. Gardner tripled leading off the fifth and scored on an infield out by Cano. Gardner suffered an embarrassing moment in the eighth, which he led off with an infield single, by getting picked off first base by reliever Jamey Wright.

So the five-game winning streak is over, but the Yankees still have a chance to win the series, which they have done in each of their past four series. Saturday night’s second game of the set pairs former AL Cy Young Award winners CC Sabathia and David Price. It will mark the ninth matchup between the two lefthanders. Price has had the upper hand in the rivalry with a 4-2 record and 2.52 ERA with the Rays winning six of the eight games.

Mo’s blown save costs CC a needed victory

It was not classic CC Sabathia Wednesday night, not Cy Young Award winning Sabathia. But it was not chronic CC Sabathia, the what’s-going-on pitcher we have watched over the past month, either. Yet if ever there was a time to see Sabathia approach the pitcher Yankees fans have come to know and love, it was at the end of this disappointing trip.

After four consecutive starts in which he allowed more than five runs (seven or more in three of them), Sabathia limited the damage to three runs in 7 1/3 innings. The Yankees gave him a quick lead of 2-0 in the first inning on a two-run home run by Alfonso Soriano and pushed it to 4-0 in the fourth on Eduardo Nunez’s first home run of the season.

CC has had a nasty habit of giving up leads this year, and while the White Sox came close when Sabathia departed the game the Yankees’ advantage was still intact albeit down to one run. It was Mariano Rivera of all people who would give up the lead in the ninth for only his third blown save in 38 opportunities this year.

That cost Sabathia the chance to even his record at 10-10. He gave up his 25th home run of the season, a solo shot in the fifth inning to Gordon Beckham, who had a strong series. CC seemed to tire in the seventh although his pitch count was manageable (86 for the game). He allowed three straight hits at the start of the seventh that made the score 4-3.

The Yankees could have supplied more support offensively but had another poor night hitting with runners in scoring position. They were 1-for-13 in the clutch during regulation as they stranded 10 base runners, eight in scoring position.

Beckham, who was 6-for-12 (.500) with two doubles, one home run and two RBI in the series, was behind Chicago’s comeback. After Rivera got the first two outs on harmless fly balls, Beckham lined a double to right-center. Mo got two quick strikes past pinch hitter Adam Dunn before the slugger punched a single past a diving Alex Rodriguez at third base and into left field for a single that scored Beckham with the tying run.

Hughes loses to former teammate Kennedy

Phil Hughes was expected to benefit from pitching in spacious Petco Park Sunday in San Diego. It did not turn out that way.

The righthander entered the game with a 3-2 record and 3.02 ERA on the road this year compared to 1-7 with a 6.02 ERA at Yankee Stadium. He may have well been in the Bronx the way Sunday’s start turned out for Hughes, who was paired against former Yankees teammate Ian Kennedy.

Hughes and Kennedy came up through the Yankees’ system together and were even roommates at one time. Kennedy was traded to the Diamondbacks as part of the three-team deal that sent Curtis Granderson from Detroit to the Yankees. Hughes was an 18-game winner and an American League All-Star in 2010. Kennedy was a 21-game winner and finished fourth in National League Cy Young Award voting in 2011. Yet both were involved in trade rumors this year. Hughes remained with the Yankees while Kennedy was dealt from Arizona to San Diego.

Making his first start for the Padres Sunday, Kennedy outpitched Hughes, who did not survive the third inning and remained winless in five starts since July 2. He put the Yankees in a 5-0 hole by the third inning while Kennedy pitched into the sixth to end his own losing streak that had stretched to 10 starts since June 1 (0-5, five no-decisions) with the 6-3 victory that gave San Diego the series and sent Hughes’ personal record to 4-10 with a 4.87 ERA.

The Yankees have gone a month since they won a series. Sunday’s loss brought them perilously close to a double-digit deficit in the AL East standings. The Yankees trail the first-place Red Sox by 9 ½ games and remain three games out of third place.

Hughes gave up five earned runs, six hits and three walks (one intentional) with one strikeout in 2 2/3 innings, his second briefest outing of the season. The shortest was May 15 against the Mariners at the Stadium when he allowed seven earned runs and six hits in two-thirds of an inning. Hughes was not nearly that bad, but he continued to have trouble finishing off hitters. Three of the runs off him came after two were out.

Kennedy (4-8) held the Yankees scoreless until two out in the sixth when he gave up two walks and two singles in succession that netted two runs. Granderson, who reached base four times with three walks and a single, drove in one of the runs with that hit.

The Yankees made it 6-3 on Austin Romine’s first career home run, a solo shot to left-center in the seventh off righthander Dale Thayer, but could not get any closer. Romine did not get the ball as a souvenir because someone in the Padres bullpen where it landed tossed it into the stands. Romine has been a bright spot for the Yankees of late. In his past eight games, the backup catcher has hit .476 with four doubles, one home run, four RBI and four walks in 21 at-bats to lift his season batting average from .132 to .213.

The Yankees got the potential tying run to the plate in the ninth inning against Padres closer Huston Street (21 saves), but pinch hitter Vernon Wells struck out.

It was a day filled with bad news for the Yankees. An MRI on Derek Jeter’s troublesome right calf revealed a Grade 1 strain which may result with the captain going on the disabled list again. Also, pitcher Michael Pineda reported stiffness in his surgical right shoulder after his two-inning stint for Triple A Scranton Saturday night and may have to be shut down.

Pitchers’ duel decided after their departures

Dodger Stadium has been the sight of many a pitchers’ duel over the past half-century going back to Johnny Podres, Don Drysdale, Sandy Koufax, Don Sutton, Fernando Valenzuela and Orel Hershiser against the likes of Warren Spahn, Bob Gibson, Tom Seaver, Steve Carlton, Dwight Gooden and Greg Maddux, to name just a few.

Add the names of Hiroki Kuroda and Clayton Kershaw to that list. The Yankees righthander and the Dodgers lefthander each sporting 10-6 records put on a dazzling show Wednesday night in a game that was not decided until they had left. Had they not come out of the game, it might still be going on. That is how good they were.

Kuroda was lifted for a pinch hitter in the top of the eighth after pitching shutout ball for seven innings, the eighth time this season he has not allowed a run. Kuroda gave up five singles and only one walk with eight strikeouts. The Dodgers got only two runners to second base during the time Kuroda was on the mound.

It was a great comeback for Kuroda, who pitched at Dodger Stadium, his home from 2008 to 2011, for the first time since he joined the Yankees last year. It was his bad luck to be paired with Kershaw, the National League Cy Young Award winner in 2011 and who was equally effective.

The Yankees got only two runners past first base in eight innings against Kershaw, who gave up five singles and no walks with five strikeouts. Kershaw came out of the game after putting down a perfect sacrifice bunt in the bottom of the eighth to get a runner in scoring position that never came home.

The game was decided following the departures of Kuroda and Kershaw in a bizarre ninth inning as the Yankees rallied to end a 13-inning scoreless stretch for a 3-0 victory. Lyle Overbay, who had driven in both Yankees runs in Tuesday night’s 3-2 loss, ended the shutout with a clutch hit both after and before some shaky Los Angeles defense.

The inning began with a leadoff walk, to Derek Jeter, who was replaced by pinch runner Eduardo Nunez. The Dodgers had a chance for a double play on a ground ball near the middle by Robinson Cano, but shortstop Hanley Ramirez hesitated slightly before feeding second baseman Mark Ellis and only got the force on Nunez.

Alfonso Soriano made the second out on a high bouncer to third baseman Juan Uribe, who had no play at second base so went for the out at first base. With Cano in scoring position, Dodgers manager Don Mattingly ordered pinch hitter Ichiro Suzuki walked intentionally and brought in lefthander Paco Rodriguez to face the lefty-swinging Overbay, who batted for Brent Lillibridge.

Rodriguez had Overbay looking foolish trying to hit his curveball. After two called strikes on check swings, Overbay got the benefit of the doubt from third base umpire Bill Miller, who did not rule that he went around as he had on the previous pitch. Rodriguez finally hung a curve that Overbay lashed into center field for a single to score Cano.

Mark Ellis, the Dodgers’ hero the night before with the game-winning hit, was responsible for the Yankees’ next two runs when he dropped Jayson Nix’s fly ball to shallow right field. Ellis apparently did not hear Dodgers right fielder Yasiel Puig call for the ball and nearly collided with him as the ball popped out of his glove.

Mariano Rivera, who was honored by the Dodgers before the game as he received a $10,000 donation to his foundation and an enormous fishing pole, notched his 34th save with a 1-2-3 ninth.

While he was stuck with another no-decision, Kuroda had to be pleased about his performance. If anyone in baseball did not want to see the calendar change today, it was Kuroda, who had a magnificent July. In five starts that month, Kuroda was 3-0 with two no-decisions and a 0.55 ERA. Kuroda has made 10 starts in July the past two seasons for the Yankees and is 5-0 with a 2.12 ERA in 68 innings.

Late rallies fall short

When discussing using Lyle Overbay in right field now that Mark Teixeira is back at first base on a regular basis, Yankees manager Joe Girardi noted that it is not a great risk for a career first baseman to play out there because that patch at Yankee Stadium is not very large. That is not the case in a place like Oakland’s O.co Coliseum.

Overbay did a serviceable job playing right field at the Stadium for three games last week against the Indians. No incidents and it helped to keep his bat in the lineup. Overbay was 3-for-9 in the series.

Tuesday night was another story. The Coliseum’s outfield is among the largest in the majors and foul ground is the most, which adds to the real estate outfielders need to cover. Overbay’s lack of experience came into play in the second inning when the Athletics got a run on a no-man’s-land double by Derek Morris, the Oakland catcher. With two out and a runner on first base, Morris hit a slicing flare near the right field line. Overbay looked to second baseman Robinson Cano as he ran in for the ball rather than taking charge. That slight hesitation was enough for the ball to drop just inside the line. Running on the crack of the bat, Josh Reddick scored all the way from first to push Oakland’s lead to 2-0.

The situation might have proved critical if the game had remained close, which was not the case until the last inning. In the fourth, Morris broke it open with a three-run home run off CC Sabathia, who had a rough night in his home area. Sabathia, who grew up in nearby Vallejo, Calif., also allowed a run with a wild pitch in the sixth inning when he got a late break off the mound and could not recover in time to cover the plate.

The A’s got to Sabathia immediately as Coco Crisp led off the first inning with his eighth homer of the season and third leading off a game this year and 15th of his career. It was not a good omen for Sabathia (6-5, 4.07 ERA), who was stung for six runs and eight hits in six innings as his career mark against the A’s went to 8-10 with a 4.66 ERA in 172 innings, including 4-6 with a 5.30 ERA at the Coliseum in 86 2/3 innings.

The 6-4 Oakland victory marked the first time this year that the Yankees lost a game started by a former Cy Young Award winner. They had been 6-0 in such games before suffering the defeat to Bartolo Colon, the 2005 winner when he was with the Angels.

The Yankees threatened Colon in the top of the first by loading the bases with one out on a single by Brett Gardner, last week’s American League Player of the Week, and two walks. Colon entered the game with only six walks in 77 1/3 innings, so the sudden lack of control was surprising. The Yankees failed to capitalize as Kevin Youkilis and Overbay both popped out.

Colon allowed the Yankees only two more hits and two more walks through the sixth. He had to sweat out the last two innings as the Yankees scored two runs each in the eighth and ninth before being able to celebrate his sixth straight victory that improve his record to 8-2. Colon has given up only three runs in 36 innings (0.75 ERA) over that stretch to lower his season ERA from 4.56 to 2.92.

The Yankees didn’t do much offensively until the last two innings. There were some good signs in the loss. Teixeira knocked in three runs with a pair of singles. Cano, who has been in a slump on the trip, reached base four times with a double, a single and two walks. Vernon Wells, also struggling, came off the bench and got a big RBI single. Gardner had two more hits, and so did Chris Stewart. Travis Hafner walked twice and smashed the ball hard twice but had nothing to show for it. Left fielder Seth Smith gloved Hafner’s drive in the ninth at the wall for the final out.

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