Results tagged ‘ Derek Jeter ’

Headley a walk-off hero in Yankees debut

A trade completed earlier in the day Tuesday with the Padres that brought third baseman Chase Headley to New York addressed the Yankees’ need to improve their offense. For one night, the move worked wonders.

Headley ended up having a dream debut by driving in the winning run of a 2-1, 14-inning victory over the Rangers. Four hours and 51 minutes after the first pitch, Headley ended a frustrating night for the Yankees and himself with a single to left-center field off Nick Tepesch, Texas’ ninth pitch of the game, that scored Brian Roberts, who had doubled with one out and moved to third base on a single to right by Francisco Cervelli.

Brett Gardner officially welcomed Headley to the Yankees with a Gatorade bath during the newcomer’s postgame interview near the dugout.

The 2012 National League Most Valuable Player candidate and RBI leader started the day in Chicago and arrived at Yankee Stadium after the game started. He batted as a pinch hitter in the eighth inning, stayed in the game at third base and had three more at-bats, two of them with a chance to produce a walk-off victory.

Headley’s previous opportunity came in the 12th inning when it appeared for sure the Yanks would put this one away. For the second time in three days, three fielders could not catch a pop fly by Brian McCann that fell for a single after a leadoff single by Carlos Beltran and a wild pitch by lefthander Ryan Feierabend. After Ichiro Suzuki advanced both runners with a sacrifice bunt, Roberts was intentionally walked to load the bases.

Righthander Scott Baker came in to face Cervelli and promptly fell behind 3-0 in the count. Cervelli took the next pitch for a strike and then hit a scorching liner that was caught by third baseman Adrian Beltre.

Up came Headley with an opportunity to be a hero, but he hit a weak ground ball to second base and the game went on.

Neither club scored for 12 innings. The Rangers broke the deadlock in the 13th on J.P. Arencibia’s home run off David Huff. Texas had two more hits that inning but failed to get an insurance run that proved necessary when closer Joakim Soria blew a save.

The Yankees finally broke through on a leadoff double by Gardner, a sacrifice by Derek Jeter, and a single by Jacoby Ellsbury. Beltran moved Ellsbury to third to give the Yanks an excellent change to finish it off. McCann did not hit the ball high enough in the air this time but rather a soft low liner that Arencibia at first base took on a bounce to start a rally-killing twin killing.

After announcing the trade, Yankees general manager Brian Cashman told reporters, “I have more work to do.” The victory, as satisfying as it was, only served to emphasize that. The Yankees failed to score over 12 innings against the worst pitching staff in the American League (4.90 ERA).

The positive for the Yanks was that their pitchers also tossed up zeroes for 12 innings. Still, the offense needs to get into gear. No team can win a game, minus one to zero.

Yankees and Rangers swap zeroes

Go figure this game. Two pitchers take the mound with identical 5.10 ERAs. Each has struggled a ton lately. The Yankees’ Chase Whitley was 1-3 with an 11.25 ERA in his previous five outings. The Rangers’ Nick Martinez, who pitched college ball at Fordham, was winless in seven starts since his only victory of the season May 24.

So what happened? Both pitched shutout ball over six innings.

It was a very positive sign for Whitley, who got solid support from his defense. Five of the seven hits he allowed were at the start of innings, usually a bad omen.

In the second inning, Leonys Martin got to third with none out on an error by third baseman Zelous Wheeler and a wild pitch, but Whitley kept the ball in the infield with two groundouts bookending a strikeout to strand Martin.

In the third, Daniel Robertson led off with a single and stole second base. After Shin-Soo Choo was called out on strikes, Robertson tried to steal third and was gunned down by Francisco Cervelli. Whitley finished off the inning by striking out Elvis Andrus.

Adrian Beltre followed Jim Adduci’s leadoff single in the fourth by grounding into a double play. In the fifth, Rangers catcher Robinson Chirinos, who doubled with one out, tried to score on an infield single by Robertson but was thrown out at the plate by Brian Roberts.

Whitley’s night was done after he gave up another leadoff hit in the seventh, a single by Beltre, but Matt Thornton and Adam Warren made sure the All-Star third baseman did not advance.

The Yankees had it even worse against Martinez, who held them to three hits and one walk in 5 1/3 innings before Neftali Feliz, the former American League Rookie of the Year, followed with 1 2/3 hitless innings of relief. The Yanks did not get a runner past first base over the first seven innings.

Martinez, too, had helped from his defense. Martin in center field climbed the auxiliary scoreboard in right-center to rob Brian McCann of a potential extra-base hit in the second inning. The ball did not appear to be over the wall when Martin gloved it.

The zeroes kept piling up after the starters were gone. The Yanks did not get a runner into scoring position until one out in the ninth when Derek Jeter doubled into the left field corner. It was career double 535 for DJ, who replaced Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig as the franchise’s all-time leader in two-base hits.

Rangers manager Ron Washington decided to have lefthander Neal Cotts walk lefty-swinging Jacoby Ellsbury intentionally and go after Carlos Beltran, a switch hitter who would bat right-handed against Cotts. The curious strategy worked as Beltran grounded into a double play that sent the game into extra innings.

Yanks’ gloves and bats come up empty

Yes, the Yankees committed five errors Monday night, quite an embarrassment in front of a packed house of 45,278 on a night when figurines of Derek Jeter were distributed. Yet in losing to the club with the worst record in the major leagues, the Yanks were at fault more for their bats than their gloves.

Only one of the Rangers’ runs in their 4-2 victory was the direct result of an error by the Yankees. The greater embarrassment for the Yankees was that they managed only merely four hits off the Rangers’ starting pitcher, Miles Mikolas, 25, a righthander making his fourth career start, paired against Shane Greene, also 25, also a righthander, who was making his third career start.

But whereas Greene came into the game with a 2-0 record and 1.32 ERA, Mikolas entered play with a 0-2 mark and 10.05 ERA. This was a projected mismatch, but it went to Mikolas instead. He pitched one out into the eighth inning and got the better of Greene and the Yankees.

Mikolas hurt himself with a balk in the first inning that led to a run on a sacrifice fly by Carlos Beltran. Jacoby Ellsbury stunned the pitcher with a home run leading off the fourth, and the Yankees had a major threat in the fifth when they loaded the bases with one out on singles by Francisco Cervelli and Zelous Weaver and a walk to Brett Gardner.

That brought up Jeter, but Mikolas won the battle as the Captain grounded into a double play. That marked the first two of nine consecutive outs for Mikolas.

Greene had a weird night. He was guilty of three of the errors charged to the Yankees. Two were on bad throws to first base with the other coming on a dropped relay at first base. None cost him a run. A dropped feed from Jeter by second baseman Brian Roberts was costly, however, allowing the first Texas run.

What was costly for Greene with the misplays was that it took him longer to get out of those innings. Yankees manager Joe Girardi pointed out after the game that Greene’s pitch count was 113, but it might have still been in the 80s when he started to have trouble in the sixth.

The Rangers grabbed a 4-2 lead with three runs that inning, all after two were out. A walk to Jim Adduci was a killer for Greene, who then yielded an RBI single by Geovanny Soto. Lefthander Matt Thornton came on and gave up consecutive singles to lefty-swinging Rougned Odor and Shin-Soo Choo.

“It was an ugly game on our part,” Girardi said. “We need to win series if we’re going to catch Baltimore. If you lose the first game, it makes it harder.”

Tough night for Gr-EEE-ne

Watching Shane Greene on the mound Monday night made one wonder how much PFP is done in the minor leagues. PFP stands for pitchers’ fielding practice, an exercise dreaded by hurlers, especially during the heat of spring training.

It is pretty boring stuff, too, but there are times when pitchers are reminded why fielding their position is important. Greene, who has done a terrific job since his recall from Triple A Scranton, had a rough time of it in the third and fourth innings and was charged with three errors. That’s three Es for a guy with three of them in his last name.

Two of the misplays came in the second inning, but he escaped without damage. Greene dropped a feed from first baseman Kelly Johnson that allowed Leonys Martin to reach first base. With two out, Greene fielding a pepper shot by Jim Adduci , but his under-handed toss sailed over Johnson’s head. That put runners on second and third, but Greene redeemed himself by striking out Geovanny Soto.

An error cost the Yankees a run in the third, but this one was by Brian Roberts. With runners on first and third with one out, the second baseman dropped shortstop Derek Jeter’s throw that might have started a double play but instead allowed the runner from third to score. Again, Greene got a strikeout to minimize the damage and end the inning.

With two out in the fourth, Greene was at it again throwing to first base as if 6-foot-8 Dellin Betances was the fielder there. Greene fielded a dribbler by Soto and threw another sailer well out of Johnson’s reach. When Rougned Odor hit a tapper to the mound, the crowd roared its approval when Greene ran toward first base and made an accurate toss to Johnson for the final out.

It took five innings for the Yankees’ hits to catch up with their errors. Jacoby Ellsbury’s eighth home run of the season, a solo shot leading off the fourth against Texas starter Miles Mikolas, was only the Yankees’ second hit. They got to four to match their errors with singles by Francisco Cervelli and Zelous Wheeler. A walk to Brett Gardner loaded the bases, but Jeter grounded into a double play.

If many of those Rangers names seem strange, well, that is because so many of their regulars are injured. Texas has already had 51 different players, including 30 pitchers, on its roster this year. Both figures are records for prior to the All-Star break. The Rangers have sunk to the bottom of the American League West by losing 24 of their previous 28 games.

Yanks not hiking prices for Jeter Day tickets

The Yankees want it to be know that there is some confusion out there about spiraling ticket prices for the Sept. 7 game against the Royals at Yankee Stadium that Friday night was designated as Derek Jeter Day.

An article in Sunday’s editions of the New York Post claimed that the Yankees “hiked the cheapest tickets on its Web site a stunning 1,250 percent – from $16 to $250,” an assertion the club said in a statement “is absolutely and categorically untrue.”

The story confuses the primary ticket market with the secondary ticket market; that is, tickets that are being sold by fans who already purchased the tickets. There are numerous resale markets including StubHub, Craigslist, Yankees Ticket Exchange, and VividSeats, where fans and brokers post tickets to be resold. There has been no change in prices of tickets being sold for that game by the Yankees.

Rest may have done Yanks a lot of good

It is beginning to look like the All-Star break was just what the Yankees needed. They certain appear rejuvenated after the four-day break. Derek Jeter, Masahiro Tanaka and Dellin Betances were the Yankees’ representatives in Minneapolis, but only Jeter played in the game. Tanaka, on the disabled list, chose not to go, and Betances was stuck in the bullpen, yet that, too, might have been a blessing.

The rest of the Yankees got some needed R&R and have come back with a determination to make a strong run for the American League East title.

Saturday, the Yankees took up from where they left off Friday night with first-year players making significant contributions in a 7-1 victory over the Reds and All-Star pitcher Alfredo Simon.

Brian McCann and Carlos Beltran, who drove in key runs Friday night, were back in the mix Saturday. Beltran had two more hits, including his 10th home run of the season. McCann started a three-run rally in the sixth inning with an against-the-shift, infield single.

At the bottom of the order, Brian Roberts and Kelly Johnson combined for four hits, four runs and two RBI. In addition to his two singles, Roberts reached base on an error by right fielder Jay Bruce, who dropped a routine fly ball in the third inning that led to a gift run on a single by Brett Gardner.

Roberts left off the fifth with a single. Johnson followed with a single, and both runners advanced on a passed ball by Devin Mesoraco. A sacrifice fly by Gardner, who had three RBI in the game, and an RBI single by Jeter pushed the Yanks’ lead to 4-1.

“We took advantages of their miscues,” manager Joe Girardi said. “We moved runners over. We got the big hits. We had good at-bats. We were very fundamentally sound.”

Among the more recent newcomers is winning pitcher Brandon McCarthy, who is off to a terrific start with the Yankees after a not very terrific first half with the Diamondbacks. Acquired July 6 from Arizona in a trade for lefthander Vidal Nuno, McCarthy has had a quality start in each of his first two appearances for the Yankees.

The righthander provided a strong six innings Saturday in allowing one run on a home run by Chris Heisey, five other hits and no walks with nine strikeouts. Known as a sinkerballer, McCarthy had more of a power sinker Saturday as the strikeouts total attests. He also got seven of his other nine outs in the infield, six on ground balls.

This was the McCarthy the Yankees envisioned when they made the trade. Yankees fans might have scoffed when they saw that McCarthy was 3-10 with a 5.01 ERA in 109 2/3 innings for the Diamondbacks, but with the Yanks he is 1-0 with a 1.42 ERA, one walk and 12 strikeouts in 12 2/3 innings.

McCarthy credited McCann, his catcher, with guiding him through the game by using his cut fastball as well as the sinker on a day when his curve was not particularly sharp.

“My curve was nothing special, but all three fastballs were there,” McCarthy said. “I had gotten away from throwing the cutter with Arizona. Here they want me to keep the cutter in play to set up hitters in a different way. It’s hard to keep major-league hitters off balance with just one pitch.”

Coming to the Yankees marks a new beginning for McCarthy coming off from a club that was in last place in the National League West.

“A situation like that can energize and motivate players,” Girardi said.

“It’s energizing in itself just to be in a division race,” McCarthy said.

The Yankees’ play post the All-Star break promises they could be in the race to stay.

Reds salute Jeter with honored shortstops

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Walt Jocketty, Derek Jeter, Todd Frazier
(USA Today photo)

The gifts keep coming for Derek Jeter. Normally the Captain has been honored by teams in his final trip to that particular city. Since the Yankees do not travel to Cincinnati this year (barring a Yanks-Reds World Series, that is), the Reds made a presentation to DJ before Saturday’s game at Yankee Stadium.

General manager Walt Jocketty and All-Star third baseman Todd Frazier, a New Jersey native, gave Jeter encased uniform jerseys of former Reds captains Dave Concepcion and Hall of Famer Barry Larkin, autographed by both former shortstops.

Frazier was a member of the Toms River, N.J., team that won the Little League World Series in 1998. When the team was honored that year before a game at Yankee Stadium, Frazier, then 12, stood alongside Jeter at shortstop during the National Anthem.

Imports’ production a healthy sign for Yanks

Perhaps the most encouraging sign for Yankees fans Friday night was the combined production of three of the club’s major imports in the off-season. Catcher Brian McCann, designated hitter Carlos Beltran and center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury got off to a great post-All-Star break start by driving in all the Yankees’ runs in their 4-3 victory over the Reds.

McCann, who struggled throughout much of the first half, has been driving the ball with more authority recently. Coming off a road trip in which he batted .351 with two doubles and two RBI, McCann came back to Yankee Stadium and whacked a double with two out in the first inning to give the Yanks an early lead with his 40th RBI of the season. He is hitting .356 with three doubles, one home run and four RBI in his past 45 at-bats.

After Bryan Pena tied the score in the third inning with the first of two home runs he hit off David Phelps, the Yankees went ahead again in the bottom half on a two-out, RBI single by Beltran, who also struggled much of the first half and has been beset with injuries. He came off the seven-day concussion list and added a double in the fifth inning.

Errors in the fourth inning by Brian Roberts and Derek Jeter cost Phelps an unearned run that knotted the score again. One inning later, the Yankees went ahead for good when Ellsbury followed a leadoff single by Jeter by driving a 1-1 pitch from Mike Leake for a two-run home run.

Phelps got clipped again in the seventh by Pena, a reserve catcher who is playing first base while former National League Most Valuable Player Joey Votto is on the disabled list because of a quad injury. Phelps gave up a single to Chris Heisey but came back to catch Ramon Santiago looking at a third strike before he was relieved by Dellin Betances.

The rookie All-Star who never got into Tuesday night’s game made an errant pickoff throw to first base that put the potential tying run in scoring position with one out. Jeter made an across-the-infield dash into foul ground in shallow left field to catch a pop fly by Billy Hamilton. Betances then finished off Zack Cozart with three 99-mph fastballs for the first of three consecutive strikeouts in another splendid setup-relief outing. David Robertson earned his 24th save with a shutout ninth.

This was a big victory for the Yanks, who face two of the toughest NL pitchers the next two days in the Reds’ Alfredo Simon and Johnny Cueto.

A pitching victory finally went to Phelps ending a stretch of four consecutive no-decisions. With the rotation in shambles because of all the injuries, Phelps has been the starting unit’s backbone. Over his past seven starts, the righthander is 3-0 with a 3.09 ERA to drop his season ERA from 4.53 to 3.87.

The victory improved the Yankees’ record against NL competition this year to 11-7, which ensures their 15th winning inter-league record. This is the Yankees’ last inter-league series of the season. The NL competition the Yanks really want to face would be in the World Series, the ultimate destination.

Circle Sept. 7: Jeter to be honored at Stadium

The Yankees will hold a special pregame ceremony to honor the career of Yankees captain Derek Jeter Sunday, Sept. 7. All fans in attendance at Yankee Stadium for the Yanks’ game against the Royals will receive a limited-edition commemorative coin that will recognize the occasion.

Further details about the ceremony will be announced at a later date. Fans interested in purchasing tickets should visit yankees.com/farewellcaptain.

Fresh from his 2-for-2 performance in the American League’s 5-3 victory in Tuesday night’s All-Star Game at Minneapolis’ Target Field, Jeter was back in the Yankees’ starting lineup for a record-setting appearance. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, it was his 2,610th start as a shortstop, the most for any player in major-league history at that position, surpassing the previous mark of Omar Vizquel.

Military Appreciation Day Sunday at Stadium

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MaryKay Messenger singing National Anthem at George M. Steinbrenner Memorial July 16, 2010 at Yankee Stadium


The Yankees will pay tribute to the Special Operations Warrior Foundation and the United States Armed Forces Sunday with Military Appreciation Day. Ceremonies will begin at noon, prior to the Yankees’ scheduled 1:05 p.m. game against the Reds. As part of the festivities, the Gold Team of the United States Army Golden Knights will parachute into Yankee Stadium with a Yankees banner bearing the logo of Derek Jeter’s final season.

Following the jump, four surviving children of servicemen that lost their lives in the line of duty and have been aided by the Special Operations Warrior Foundation will be recognized in a special ceremony at the plate.

Also taking part in the ceremonies will be retired Air Force Col. John Carney, who will throw out the ceremonial first pitch; country music recording artist and former U.S. Ranger, Keni Thomas, who will sing the National Anthem, and the official vocalist of the West Point Band, Master Sgt. MaryKay Messenger, who will sing God Bless America.

Ticket specials during the 10-game homestand against the Reds, Rangers and Blue Jays will run Saturday, July 19 (Youth Game), Monday, July 21 (Military Personnel Game), Tuesday, July 22 (Military Personnel Game), Wednesday, July 23 (Military Personnel and Student Game), Thursday, July 24 (MasterCard Half-Price, Military Personnel and Senior Citizen Game) and Saturday, July 26 (Youth Game).

For a complete list of ticket specials, including game dates, seating locations, and terms and conditions, fans should visit http://www.yankees.com/ticketspecials. Please note that all ticket specials are subject to availability.

The homestand will also feature the following promotional items and dates:

Friday, July 18 – Yankees vs. Reds, 7:05 p.m.
Cap Night, presented by Budweiser, to first 18,000 guests, 21 and older.

Saturday, July 19 – Yankees vs. Reds, 1:05 p.m.
Collectible Truck Day, presented by W.B. Mason, to first 18,000 guests, 14 and younger.

Sunday, July 20 – Yankees vs. Reds, 1:05 p.m.
1999 World Series Champions Fan Ring Day, presented by Betteridge Jewelers, to first 18,000 guests, 14 and younger.

Monday, July 21 – Yankees vs. Rangers, 7:05 p.m.
Derek Jeter Figurine Night, presented by P.C. Richard and Son, to first 18,000 guests.

Tuesday, July 22 – Yankees vs. Rangers, 7:05 p.m.
Cap Night, presented by Cooper Tire, to first 18,000 guests.

Wednesday, July 23 – Yankees vs. Rangers, 7:05 p.m.
T-Shirt Night, presented by CenterLight Healthcare, to first 18,000 guests.

Saturday, July 26 – Yankees vs. Blue Jays, 1:05 p.m.
Sunglasses Day, presented by sweetFrog, to first 18,000 guests, 14 and younger.

Sunday, July 27 – Yankees vs. Blue Jays, 1:05 p.m.
Paul O’Neill Bobblehead Day, presented by AT&T, to first 18,000 guests.

Tickets may be purchased online at http://www.yankees.com, http://www.yankeesbeisbol.com, at the Yankee Stadium Ticket Office, via Ticketmaster phone at (877) 469-9849, Ticketmaster TTY at (800) 943-4327 and at all Ticket Offices located within Yankees Clubhouse Shops. Tickets may also be purchased on Yankees Ticket Exchange at http://www.yankees.com/yte, the only official online resale marketplace for Yankees fans to purchase and resell tickets to Yankees games. Fans with questions may call (212) YANKEES [926-5337] or email tickets@yankees.com.

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