Results tagged ‘ Fenway Park ’

Injuries piling up down the stretch for Yankees

Yankees manager Joe Girardi had something of a makeshift lineup for Sunday night’s finale of the four-game series at Fenway Park where they hoped to avoid a sweep. Three of the players in the Yankees’ batting order were not even on the club a week ago.

Injuries to second baseman Starlin Castro and center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury sustained in Saturday’s 6-5 loss to the Red Sox forced Girardi to improvise. Mason Williams, who was recalled from Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre last week, started in center field. At second base was Donovan Solano, who was called up Sunday morning. At first base was Billy Butler, who was released by the Athletics two weeks and signed by the Yankees last week.

Also out of the lineup was third baseman Chase Headley, who has a stiff lower back. Ronald Torreyes started in his place.

Castro’s injury is the most serious, a Grade 1 strain of his right hamstring. He pulled up lame while running out a double in the fifth inning. Such ailment often takes two weeks to recover from, and that is all that is left of the Yankees’ season. His loss comes at a time when he has been hot with 12 hits, including a home run and three doubles, in his past 24 at-bats.

Ellsbury bruised his right knee sliding into the fence in right-center field while tracking a double by Xander Bogaerts that started the two-run rally in which the Red Sox overtook the Yankees and knocked them behind four clubs in pursuit of the second American League Wild Card slot in the playoffs. Luis Severino was charged with his first earned run in 20 innings as a reliever as the Red Sox tied the score. They got the winning run on a wild pitch by Adam Warren.

Castro and Ellsbury underwent MRI exams Sunday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital and were treated by Dr. Christopher Ahmad, the team physician. Both players are expected to rejoin the club in St. Petersburg, Fla., by Tuesday night when the Yanks open a three-game series against the Rays at Tropicana Field.

Sanchez lone highlight in lost weekend at Boston

If not for Gary Sanchez, there would not have been much for a Yankees fan to cheer about this weekend. Sanchez kept up his remarkable productivity in his first full month as a major leaguer by going 7-for-19 (.368) with two doubles, two home runs and five RBI in the four games at Fenway Park.

Unfortunately for the Yankees, all of that was for naught as they lost all four games to mark their first sweep of a series of at least four games in Boston since June 4-7, 1990. That was the series where Stump Merrill succeeded Bucky Dent as manager in one of the lowest points in franchise history.

This Yankees team was a far better bunch that the cellar dwellers of 26 seasons ago and entered Red Sox Nation on a high more after a 7-3 homestand put them in solid contention for a Wild Card berth in the playoffs. Thursday night, the Yankees were two outs from being only one game away from the second Wild Card slot and just three games out of first place in the American League East.

But a five-run ninth inning climaxed by Hanley Ramirez’s three-run home run off Dellin Betances knocked the Yankees off course and set the tone for a devastating weekend. Ramirez was it again Sunday night as he slugged two more home runs in yet another Red Sox comeback victory. Just as they had done in the series opener, the Yankees squandered a 4-0 lead in the finale as well.

The Yankees failed to hold leads in three of the four games. CC Sabathia cruised through four innings and nearly got through the fifth as well until his own glaring error opened the gate for the Red Sox. Boston had runners on first and second with one out when Mookie Betts hit a scorching liner to the center of the infield that was gloved by Sabathia. He tried to double Xander Bogaerts off first base but threw wildly past Billy Butler. That play gave a free at-bat to Ramirez, who socked a three-run homer over the Green Monster to make it a one-run game.

Sabathia surrendered the lead in the fifth by yielding successive singles to Travis Shaw, Aaron Hill and Jackie Bradley Jr. Blake Parker did a tremendous job keeping the score 4-4 by striking out David Ortiz, who did not start and came up as a pinch hitter, and retiring Dustin Pedroia on a fielder’s choice and Bogaerts on a strikeout.

Ramirez struck again the next inning, however, by driving a Tyler Clippard changeup over the Monster for his second homer of the game and 28th of the season. Ramirez terrorized the Yankees all weekend by going 9-for-16 (.538) with a double, four homers and nine RBI.

The Yankees’ losing streak has reached five games and leaves them four games behind the Blue Jays for the second Wild Card spot. In addition, the Yankees are two games behind the Tigers and the Mariners and one game back of the Astros, all teams the Yanks had passed during a seven-game winning streak. They get a needed day off Monday before continuing the trip with a three-game series against their Rays at Tropicana Field.

Another Betances breakdown spoils trip opener

For quite a spell Thursday night it looked as if the Yankees were going to shake off Wednesday’s deflating loss to the Dodgers and make a lot of headway in the standings. It seemed all set up for them with leads of 4-0 and 5-1, but try to remember the game was played at Fenway Park.

The Yankees stopped scoring after the fourth inning and so they did not exactly put the Red Sox away despite seven solid innings from Masahiro Tanaka. A solo homer by David Ortiz in the eighth off Adam Warren cut the Yankees’ lead to 5-2.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi had hoped to stay away from Dellin Betances in the ninth but was forced to bring him in when Blake Parker hit Chris Young with a pitch with one out. For the second straight game, however, Betances could not get it done. Two-out hits by Ortiz and Mookie Betts made it a one-run game. Betances then fell behind 3-1 in the count to Hanley Ramirez, who drove the next pitch over the center field wall for a walk-off, three-run home run.

Oh, does this one hurt. A victory would have lifted the Yankees past the Tigers and one game behind the Orioles for the second Wild Card slot not to mention moving to three games of the first-place Red Sox in the American League East and give Boston second second thoughts about its security.

For a team that banged out 14 hits and had four other base runners on three walks and a hit batter, the Yankees should have scored more than five runs. They were 5-for-16 (.313) with runners in scoring position which is good, but they stranded 12 runners, half of them over the final five innings when they were 1-for-8 (.125) with runners in scoring position.

It was the fifth blown save for Betances, whose ERA soared to 2.83, and a tough no-decision for Tanaka, who is 6-0 with a 1.86 ERA in his past eight starts.

And it was another Yankee-killing game for Ortiz, who had three RBI and has six home runs and 11 RBI against them this year. Ortiz’s 34th home run of the season was career No. 537 to move past Mickey Mantle into 17th place on the all-time list. Ortiz has 53 career homers against the Yankees.

Butler contributes right away for Yankees

Billy Butler did not waste any time to get into the swing of things in his first game for the Yankees. Less than two hours after arriving in Boston while the Yanks were taking batting practice, Butler hit a sacrifice fly in his first at-bat Thursday night.

Butler, who was released by the Athletics a week ago, was signed by the Yankees, who were in search for a right-handed hitter after rookie Aaron Judge had to be placed on the 15-day disabled list due to a strained right oblique. The Yanks have been vulnerable to left-handed pitching all season.

Butler, a designated hitter and first baseman, had his best years with the Royals and had a hard time of it in Oakland since signing a three-year contract as a free agent after the 2014 season. He recently got into a fight with A’s teammate Danny Valencia, which greased the skids for Butler in Oakland.

The Yankees faced a left-handed starter in Eduardo Rodriguez, who had been tough on them in the past but failed to get past the third inning Thursday night. The Yanks struck for two runs in the first on a single by Jacoby Ellsbury, a double by Gary Sachez, an RBI single by Starlin Castro and the sac fly by Butler.

They added two more runs in the third with Butler getting his second RBI on a single that followed a double by Castro, who rebounded from his costly error Wednesday against the Dodgers with a four-hit, two-RBI game at Fenway Park. A double by Didi Gregorius and a single by Chase Headley made the score 4-0 and chased Rodriguez, who entered the game with a 4-1 record and 1.88 ERA in his career against the Yankees and was 1-0 with a 1.29 ERA against them this year.

The multitude of early-inning runs were a blessing to Masahiro Tanaka, who navigated his way through the Red Sox batting order without his best stuff. For example, he walked two batters in the third inning, which was twice as many as he walked in the entire month of August. The Red Sox loaded the bases with one out that inning, but Tanaka limited the damage to a sacrifice fly by David Ortiz.

The Yankees nullified that run the next inning on a two-out, RBI single by Castro. Tanaka pitched seven innings but did not strike out a single batter. He did get 18 of his 21 outs in the infield, 15 of them on ground balls.

Sanchez’s big night justifies Girardi’s decision

The Alex Rodriguez apologists in the media got all over Yankees manager Joe Girardi for not starting the soon-to-be-released designated hitter Wednesday night at Fenway Park against Red Sox lefthander Drew Pomeranz.

Girardi simply felt the Yankees had a better chance with rookie Gary Sanchez in the DH spot. So was the skipper wrong? All Sanchez did was get four hits, including his first major league home run, to help fortify a Yankees’ comeback from a 4-1 deficit for a startling 9-4 victory in a nine-inning marathon that took four hours and 15 minutes to complete due primarily to 13 pitching changes combined for both teams.

A-Rod did get an at-bat in the turnaround inning for the Yanks, the five-run seventh that included a hit and a run scored by Sanchez. Rodriguez batted for Aaron Hicks with two on and none out and the Yankees down by two runs. A-Rod flied out to deep right field with Sanchez crossing to third base. A strikeout of Brett Gardner appeared to put a stake in the heart of the rally, but RBI singles by Jacoby Ellsbury and Chase Headley and a clutch, two-run double by Starlin Castro thrust the Yankees into the lead.

They added three runs in the eighth with Sanchez leading off with a bomb to center field. The other two runs scored on two of reliever Robbie Ross’ three wild pitches.

On the negative side for the Yanks, starter Nathan Eovaldi had to come out of the game after one inning because of right elbow soreness, which forced Girardi to go deep into his bullpen using seven relievers.

With Eovaldi out of the game, the official scorer has the discretion of awarding the winning decision to an effective reliever and chose Tyler Clippard, who allowed four base runners (three hits and one intentional walk) but no runs. My choice would have been Adam Warren, who set down the six batters he faced with two strikeouts.

With all the moves the Yankees have made this month, Warren has been somewhat overlooked. He went to the Cubs over the winter in the Castro trade and was reacquired last month in the deal that sent Aroldis Chapman to Wrigleyville. Since his return to the Yankees, Warren has retired 26 of 32 batters in nine scoreless innings during which he has yielded four hits and two walks with eight strikeouts.

A-Rod watchers will be happy to see that Boston’s change in a starting pitcher from previously-scheduled knuckleballer Steven Wright to Eduardo Rodriguez Thursday night did not change the manager’s mind about the DH spot. A-Rod will be in their against E-Rod (no relation). The computer did not work against A-Rod, either. He entered the game a .385 career hitter with a double and a home run in 13 at-bats against his namesake. Sanchez was also in the starting lineup behind the plate with fellow catcher Austin Romine at first base giving a breather to Mark Teixeira.

As for Friday night at Yankee Stadium against the Rays to open a six-game homestand when Rodriguez will play his final game for the Yankees he will again be the DH. Rodriguez told a radio audience Friday that his request to play third base one last time was rejected by Girardi.

Who can blame the manager? Rodriguez has not worn a glove on the field since May 23 last year when he played one inning at first base in a 15-4 loss to the Rangers at the Stadium. A-Rod’s most recent game at third base was May 19 last year for three innings in an 8-6, 10-inning loss at Washington.

Girardi managing whole team, not just A-Rod

Did anyone really expect Alex Rodriguez to be in the starting lineup Tuesday night at Fenway Park? Sure, manager Joe Girardi said Sunday after A-Rod’s announcement that Friday night would be his last game with the Yankees that he would talk to him and “play him as often as he wants,” but he had to back off that for the overall good of the team.

As it is, promising Rodriguez at least one start in the three-game series, Thursday night against knuckleballer Steven Wright, is more than A-Rod could have expected. If the Yankees want to make a serious run at the second wild card berth, they will have to hop over several clubs, and one of them is Boston. A player is supposed to earn his way into a lineup, and Rodriguez’s 3-for-30 showing in the second half is all the evidence anyone needs as to why he played himself onto the bench.

The computer got Rodriguez Tuesday night. He is 3-for-20 (.150) in his career against Boston starter Rick Porcello. The righthander had pitched complete games in each of his previous two starts, a rarity these days. Red Sox manager John Farrell might have been wise to let Porcello go for another compete game rather than turn to Craig Kimbrel, who was so wild that he nearly blew the game.

Kimbrel walked four batters in the inning that led to a run and kept the bases loaded with two out. Matt Barnes had to be summoned to face Mark Teixeira, who ended the rally when he looked at a third strike.

In A-Rod’s former designated hitter role was Brian McCann as the Yankees got another look at Gary Sanchez behind the plate. He had a rough night at the plate (0-for-4) but was nimble behind it and threw out another base runner.

McCann got a key, two-out single in the third inning that scored Brett Gardner, who reached base four times (double, two singles, walk) as the Yanks built a 2-0 lead against Porcello (15-3). They had scored in the second inning as well on doubles by Starlin Castro and Chase Headley.

Making his first major league start since May 13 following three impressive relief outings in which he allowed one run in 8 1/3 innings (1.08 ERA), Luis Severino gave up the lead in losing a nine-pitch at-bat to Dustin Pedroia. After fouling off five straight pitches, Pedroia lined a double down the right field line to knock in the trying runs.

More extra-base hits were to come in the fifth as the Red Sox scored three runs in a triple by catcher Sandy Leon, a double by rookie Andrew Benintendi and another double by Pedroia. Newly signed lefthander Tommy Layne relieved Severino and allowed an RBI single to David Ortiz.

Until the meltdown by Kimbrel, there were no openings to use Rodriguez perhaps as a pinch hitter. Reports questioned why Girardi did not have A-Rod bat form Aaron Hicks, who was 0-for-3 when he batted in the ninth and drew the second walk off Kimbrel.

Will this ever end? Yes. Finally, Friday.

Bats come alive, but Yanks drop 5th straight

On a night when the Yankees showed encouraging signs of breaking out of their offensive malaise, their pitchers were responsible for another loss that completed a three-game sweep by the Red Sox at Fenway Park and extended the losing streak to a season-high five games.

The 8-7 final marked the first time in eight games that the Yankees scored more than three runs in a game and only the sixth time in 23 games this year. They were 4-for-8 with runners in scoring position and totaled five extra-base hits, including career home run No. 692 for Alex Rodriguez, who has recovered quite nicely from that tweaked oblique last week. After missing two games, A-Rod has batted .429 with four runs, two doubles, two home runs and six RBI in 14 at-bats.

Sunday night’s game was a reversal for the Yankees in that the sluggish offense was not the culprit in a defeat. For the second time in three nights, Dellin Betances gave up a two-run home run in a late inning that supplied the deciding run. Friday night it was David Ortiz’s blast in the eighth on a first-pitch curveball. Sunday night, it was a monster shot to left field that went entirely out of the park by Christian Vazquez on a first-pitch fastball in the seventh.

Betances shouldered the blame for both games, but he certainly was not alone. Starter Nathan Eovaldi, who flirted with a no-hitter in his previous outing, surrendered leads of 3-1 and 6-4 in the bottom half of the innings in which the Yankees had gone ahead. Eovaldi was back to his old ways in giving up 10 hits in five-plus innings.

The loss was charged to Ivan Nova (1-1), who replaced Eovaldi in the sixth after a leadoff walk. Travis Shaw, who clocked a game-tying, two-run home run off Eovaldi in the fifth, singled off Nova with one down in the seventh. Brock Holt followed with a grounder to third baseman Chase Headley, who had trouble removing the ball from his glove as the Yankees were able to get a force at second base but not a double play. Betances then was summoned to pitch to Vazquez and allowed a home run for his third consecutive appearance.

Vazquez’s homer put David Price in position for the winning decision that ran his record with his new club to 4-0. It was not a pretty outing for Price, who raised his career mark against the Yankees to 14-7 despite a 4.17 ERA. The lefthander yielded six earned runs and eight hits in seven innings and heard booing at Fenway Park where he has pitched to an 8.34 ERA in four starts totaling 22 2/3 innings. Since the start of 2014, the Yanks have batted .303 with 17 doubles, four triples and six home runs against Price.

Jacoby Ellsbury’s second double of the game tied the score at 1 in the third inning. Two batters later, Rodriguez launched his fifth home run this season to make it 3-1. The Red Sox moved back ahead, 4-3, in the bottom half on a two-run single by Hanley Ramirez and a two-out, RBI single by Holt.

Rodriguez doubled home two runs in the fifth and scored on a single by Mark Teixeira as the Yankees regained the lead, 6-4. Again, Eovaldi could not hold it in yielding the bomb to Shaw. The Yankees made it a one-run game in the eighth with a run on a wild pitch by Koji Uehara, but that would be as close as they came.

While the Yankees sank deeper in the basement of the American League East with an 8-15 record, the Red Sox took over first place in the division by a half-game over the Orioles, who await the Bombers at Camden Yards for a three-game series that begins Tuesday night.

Yanks offer no resistance in blanking to Red Sox

Ronald Torreyes pinch-hit for Alex Rodriguez in the ninth inning Saturday night. It was the first time a player with no home runs in his career batted for a player with 691 homers. That is all you need to know about how the Yankees fared in the game.

This spring-training sort of finish explained the Yankees’ situation. Nothing A-Rod could have done in that at-bat in the final inning was going to do anything other than to avoid a shutout. The Red Sox pushed the Yankees all over Fenway Park for an 8-0 victory behind unbeaten Rick Porcello (5-0), who fashioned a start that the Bombers have seldom gotten from their rotation.

Porcello shut down the Yankees on five hits and a walk with six strikeouts in seven innings as he pitched six or more innings for his 13th straight start since last August. On the other hand, Michael Pineda (1-3) lasted only five innings for the second straight start. Coming off a game in which he yielded five home runs, Pineda kept the ball in the yard this time but exhibited trouble pitching with two outs.

Boston scored two runs after two were gone in the second inning on a single by Christian Vazquez and doubles by Jackie Bradley Jr. and Mookie Betts. Pineda actually pitched well after that, but his pitch count was so high that he had to come out after the fifth.

The Yankees’ bullpen could not keep the game close. Chasen Shreve gave up two runs in the sixth with Bradley a culprit again belting an RBI triple and then scoring on a single by Betts. David Ortiz, who won Friday night’s game with a two-run home run in the eighth, greeted Johnny Barbeto with a solo shot in the seventh. The Red Sox added three more runs on a walk, a single, an error by second baseman Starlin Castro and a two-run triple by Bradley, who has been a one-man wrecking crew in this series. Bradley is 4-for-6 (.667) with two doubles, two triples and five RBI in the series. And he is the 9-hole hitter!

Nevertheless, this was a game the Yankees were still in until the seventh, but their sleepwalking offense had another silent night. The Yankees had five singles and were 0-for-2 with runners in scoring position. They have scored three of fewer runs in 17 of their 22 games, including each of the past seven games.

Manager Joe Girardi is not ready to push the panic button, but the first month of the season is complete and his team has an 8-14 record amid a four-game losing streak with David Price (3-0) looming Sunday night.

Red Sox pound Green Monster late for comeback win

Fenway Park has been a comfort zone for the Yankees in recent years. Red Sox fans could not have been pleased that the Yankees won seven of nine games there last year and were 23-13 at Fenway since the start of 2012, their best four-year run in the rival team’s home in 49 years.

Masahiro Tanaka certainly looked comfortable at Fenway Friday night. Until the seventh inning, that is. Tanaka was working on a three-hit shutout through six when the tide turned against him. Three left-handed batters went to the opposite field for hits that wiped out a 2-0 deficit.

A double off the wall by Jackie Bradley that scored Travis Shaw and Brock Holt, each of whom had punched singles to left field with one out, was the killer for Tanaka, a stunning development since it came one pitch after the righthander had struck out Ryan Hanigan on a 94-mph fastball. 

Given new life, the Red Sox struck again in the eighth against Dellin Betances. David Ortiz drove a hanging curve ball over the Green Monster for a two-run home run. Just like that, the Yankees were 4-2 losers. Yankees fans have seen Ortiz do such dramatics over the years against the Bombers. Ortiz is a career .307 hitter with 48 home runs and 160 RBI in 834 career at-bats against Yankees pitching. Fourteen of those homers have given Boston leads in games. Yankees fans are happy this is his last season.

That the Red Sox were still in position to make a comeback was due primarily to the failure of the Yankees’ offense to take advantage of all the base runners they had over the first six innings against lefthander Henry Owens, who entered the game with a career 13.50 ERA against them. Brett Gardner’s two-out, RBI single in the fifth was the Yanks’ only hit in five at-bats with runners in scoring position. Alex Rodriguez’s fourth home run accounted for the other Yankees run. They had 10 runners on base in the first five innings against Owens, and only two scored. The Red Sox turned four double plays behind Owens.

Rodriguez’s 691st career home run was also career hit No. 3,082, which pushed him past Hall of Famer Cap Anson into 20th place on the all-time list. Next up is another Hall of Famer, Dave Winfield, at 3,110.

Boston relievers Matt Barnes, Koji Uehara and Craig Kimbrel each retired the side in order in the seventh, eighth and ninth innings, respectively. The Yankees’ opportunities came against Owens, but they let them slip away, just like the game.

Yanks take 12-1 lead, then have to sweat it out

The Yankees ended the trip in Boston the way it began in Atlanta with a blowout victory, although matters got a bit dicey in the late innings, which is typical of life at Fenway Park.

Scoring runs was what this trek was all about for the Yankees, which they sorely needed following their prior disappointing homestand. Perhaps the upcoming, 10-game homestand against the Rays, Orioles and Blue Jays that begins Friday night will be more successful for the Bombers now that they have loosened up offensively.

A 13-8 victory over the Red Sox in a late-afternoon start made it a 5-1 trip for the Yankees, who outscored opponents by a combined score of 57-24.

It did not take long for David Ortiz to break out of his funk. The day after he took a golden sombrero with four strikeouts Tuesday night, Big Papi broke the spell in the first inning with a double to right field that scored Mookie Betts, who led off with a double off the Green Monster but was still stuck on second base with two out.

Boston’s glee was short-lived, however. The Yankees responded in the second inning with an eight-run outburst that began with a two-run home run by Greg Bird. Yes, that was Bird at first base for the Yankees as manager Joe Girardi came to his senses and kept Alex Rodriguez as the designated hitter instead of using him at first base against a left-handed starting pitcher, in this case rookie Henry Owens.

With the injury to first baseman Mark Teixeira that has sidelined him for two weeks and likely will keep him out another fortnight, Girardi had been contemplating playing Rodriguez a first base on occasion even though he displayed no proclivity at the position when used there earlier this season. The feeling here is that A-Rod should not wander off the DH position at this time of year after spending all season in that role. Moving to a position in the field for a 40-year-old who has hardly used a glove all season did not seem to make much sense.

So Rodriguez stayed at DH with Bird at first base, and did that not work out for the Yankees as they chased Owen in that second inning? Bird’s homer following a one-out walk to Chase Headley was the rookie’s fourth hit in 10 at-bats against lefthanders, so it could mean that platooning him may not be necessary.

And A-Rod struck the blow that knocked out Owen, a two-run single, then trotted home after Carlos Beltran slugged the first pitch from reliever Ryan Cook over the Monster for the Yanks’ third home run of the inning. John Ryan Murphy had followed Bird’s blow with one of his own.

The inning also included yet more hits from red-hot Didi Gregorius (single) and Stephen Drew (double), both left-handed hitters, and another run-scoring hit off a lefty by Chris Young. Drew kept it up with a three-run home run an inning later as did Gregorius with a solo shot in the fifth.

Boston fans who remember his importance as the shortstop on the Red Sox’ 2013 World Series champions may wonder why Yankees fans have been so rough on Drew. Actually, Yanks fans have been awfully patient with Drew, whose batting average was below .200 most of the past two seasons.

After starting the trip 0-for-4 with his average falling to .192, Drew vaulted over the Mendoza the past four games with nine hits in 12 at-bats (.750) with two doubles, two home runs and nine RBI and is now hitting a robust .211.

Gregorius, another Yankees infielder who took a while to win over the fans, also had a huge trip with 14 hits in 24 at-bats (.583), one double, two home runs and 10 RBI. The shortstop walked three times and scored seven runs and lifted his batting average from .253 to .272.

An emotional spot for the Yanks was the appearance of Andrew Bailey in relief of winning pitcher Mashiro Tanaka (11-6) in the seventh inning. Bailey, the 2009 American League winner of the Jackie Robinson Rookie of the Year Award with the Athletics, last pitched in the majors two years ago for the Red Sox and came back from two shoulder injuries. The righthander showed some rust in giving up two walks and a single, but just getting back on a big-league hill was a major hurdle for the New Jersey native who now lives in Connecticut.

However, the lack of shutdown work by Bailey and Bryan Mitchell, who gave up two runs in the eighth, forced Girardi to use Dellin Betances in what was once a 12-1 game to get out of a bases-loaded situation with a strikeout of Pablo Sandoval and a force play by Zander Bogaerts.

Caleb Cotham did not make Girardi’s job easier as the skipper was forced to bring in Andew Miller in a non-closing situation after the first two Boston batters in the ninth reached base on doubles. Miller finally put an end to the trip that kept the Yanks within reach of Toronto in the American League East and bolstered their hold on a wild-card berth.