Results tagged ‘ Joe McCarthy ’

Girardi dunked; Yanks donate $100G to ALS

The Ice Bucket Challenge that has helped bring awareness to the debilitating disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) reached the Yankees Wednesday as manager Joe Girardi took part and then offered challenges to the four newest members of Monument Park — Joe Torre, Goose Gossage, Tino Martinez and Paul O’Neill. Torre already participated earlier this month alongside commissioner-elect Rob Manfred.

In connection with Girardi’s participation, the Yankees pledged $100,000 to the ALS Association (www.alsa.org). The donation is made in recognition of those who bravely live with ALS, those who have died from the condition and those around the world who have taken part in the Ice Bucket Challenge in an effort to raise awareness and funding to find a cure.

Girardi, whose uncle died of the disease in April, told reporters in Detroit after Yanks publicist Jason Zillo dumped over an ice bucket on him, “I think this is a really good thing. It started here, and it’s bringing a lot of attention to ALS. It’s a horrific disease, what it does to people. And it’s not just older, it’s young people that it happens to. Hopefully all these things people are doing to raise money help find a cure.”

Video of Girardi’s participation may be found at http://www.yankees.com, on the Yankees’ official Twitter account (@yankees) and on the Yankees’ official Facebook page (facebook.com/yankees).

“The Yankees organization has been inspired by the public’s embrace of the Ice Bucket Challenge as a creative way to support ALS charities,” Yankees chief operating officer Lonn Trost said. “We make this donation in the memory of everyone who has been touched by ALS and those who have tried to make a difference in finding a cure.”

The Yankees have had a long-standing relationship with the ALS Association Greater New York Chapter (www.als-ny.org), providing financial contributions and other resources to the organization.

ALS is most closely associated with former Yankees first baseman and captain Lou Gehrig, who passed away from its effects June 2, 1941 at the age of 37. Former Yankees pitcher and fellow Hall of Famer Jim “Catfish” Hunter also died from ALS in 1999 at the age of 53.

Known as “The Iron Horse,” Gehrig played in 2,130 consecutive games before taking himself out of the Yankees’ lineup prior to the team’s May 2, 1939 game at Detroit where the Yankees are now involved in a series against the Tigers. He never played in a major-league game again.

This year marks the 75th anniversary of Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day, which was held July 4, 1939, at Yankee Stadium between games of a doubleheader against the old Washington Senators. After receiving kind words from New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, U.S. Postmaster General James A. Farley, Yankees manager Joe McCarthy and former teammate Babe Ruth, Gehrig stepped to the microphone to make his famous speech which began, “For the past two weeks, you’ve been reading about a bad break. Today, I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the Earth.”

Cashman: Retire captaincy with Jeter

Yankees general manager Brian Cashman believes that once Derek Jeter retires, the captaincy of the Yankees should retire as well.

Speaking to the Taylor Hooton Foundation’s fifth annual “Give A Hoot” benefit in a luxury suite at Yankee Stadium Sunday, Cash was asked who should succeed Jeter as team captain after his retirement.

Cashman’s response was “I’m not that big on captains myself. More than one player can lead by example. DJ has had this remarkable career, and I think when this great player retires the captaincy should go with him, but that’s not my call.”

Actually, the Yankees once went more than 35 years without a captain and during that time the team won 12 World Series titles. Lou Gehrig had been the Yankees’ captain for 13 years when he was forced into retirement due to illness in 1939. Then manager Joe McCarthy proclaimed that the Yankees would never again have another captain.

The idea of another Yankees captain was not broached seriously until after George Steinbrenner purchased the club in 1973. Three years later, he recommended Thurman Munson for the role. Told in a meeting of what McCarthy had said 37 years earlier, the Boss said, “I am sure Mr. McCarthy would change his mind if he had met Mr. Munson.”

The catcher served in the role until his death in Aug. 2, 1979. Jeter has been the Yankees’ captain the past 11 years. The previous team captain was Don Mattingly, who retired after the 1995 season. Other former Yankees captains in the Steinbrenner years were Willie Randolph, Ron Guidry and Graig Nettles.

As Cashman pointed out, it is not his call. An owner or a manager or a group of players could well start a campaign for a captain at any time. I am with the GM on this one. You never say never, but I would not mind waiting another 37 years. Jeter’s shoes are just as great to fill as were Gehrig’s.

75th anniversary of Lou’s “luckiest man” speech

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Lou Gehrig at Yankee Stadium July 4, 1939

One of baseball’s most memorable moments had nothing to do with a ball being pitched or hit. It was a speech delivered July 4, 1939 by Lou Gehrig at Yankee Stadium as he bid farewell to the game and his fans.

Having been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Gehrig took himself out of the lineup May 2, 1939, in Detroit, thereby ending a consecutive game streak of 2,130 games that lasted as a record until broken in 1995 by Cal Ripken Jr.

On the Fourth of July that year, the Yankees honored the “Iron Horse” at the Stadium before a sellout crowd of nearly 70,000 people. Along the baselines stood his teammates from the current Yankees and those from years gone by, the famous “Murderers Row” teams of the 1920s, including Babe Ruth.

Gehrig had not prepared a speech. He did not expect to talk but just to wave his cap in appreciation. Yankees manager Joe McCarthy whispered to Gehrig, “Lou, you’ve got to say something,” and out of the first baseman’s mouth came words of emotion and dignity.

Here is what Lou Gehrig said:

“Fans, for the past two weeks you have been reading about the bad break I got. Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of this earth. I have been in ballparks for 17 years and have never received anything but kindness and encouragement from you fans.

“Look at these grand men. Which of you wouldn’t consider it the highlight of his career just to associate with them for even one day? Sure, I’m lucky. Who wouldn’t consider it an honor to have known Jacob Ruppert? Also, the builder of baseball’s greatest empire, Ed Barrow? To have spent six years with that wonderful little fellow, Miller Huggins? Then to have spent the next nine years with that outstanding leader, that smart student of psychology, the best manager in baseball today, Joe McCarthy? Sure, I’m lucky.

“When the New York Giants, a team you would give your right arm to beat, and vice versa, sends you a gift – that’s something. When everybody down to the groundskeepers and those boys in white coats remember you with trophies – that’s something. When you have a wonderful mother-in-law who takes sides with you in squabbles with her own daughter – that’s something. When you have a father and a mother who work all their lives so you can have an education and build your body – it’s a blessing. When you have a wife who has been a tower of strength and shown more courage than you dreamed existed – that’s the finest I know.

“So I close in saying that I may have had a tough break, but I have an awful lot to live for.”

That moment will be celebrated this week. At Yankee Stadium Wednesday, the first 18,000 customers will receive a Lou Gehrig bobblehead that depicts him the day he gave that speech.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum will celebrate the Diamond Anniversary of Lou Gehrig Day in Cooperstown, N.Y., with special programming while teaming up with the ALS Association Upstate New York Chapter to honor the Hall of Fame first baseman.

The Museum will offer tributes throughout the day Friday, July 4 as well as provide complimentary admission for those with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a care-giver, pre-arranged through The ALS Association UNY Chapter.

Gehrig was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1939 in a special election by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America before passing away June 2, 1941.

Special programs offered by the Museum Friday, July 4 – all included with Museum admission – will feature:

10 a.m. – The Plaques of the Gallery (Buck O’Neil Award, 1st Floor)
Learn about the history of the Hall of Fame Gallery and the process by which each plaque is made and installed in this 20-minute guided tour.

10 a.m. – 3 p.m. – Operation Gratitude (Learning Center, 1st Floor)
Honor the military personnel and veterans by taking some time out of your visit to write a letter to our soldiers and veterans. All letters will be sent to Operation Gratitude. In honor of the 4th of July we will be handing out American Flags participants in this Museum program.

11 a.m. – Guided Tour: Lou Gehrig (Location, 2nd Floor)
Gehrig’s career will be highlighted in a guided tour throughout the Museum focusing on artifacts that relate to the Iron Horse.

1 p.m. – Artifact Spotlight: Lou Gehrig (Bullpen Theater, 1st Floor)
Get an up-close look at artifacts highlighting Gehrig’s career not currently on exhibit, and learn about the stories behind them.

2 p.m. – A Tribute to Lou Gehrig’s “Luckiest Man” Speech
A tribute features a first baseman from each major league team reciting a line from Gehrig’s “Luckiest Man” speech.

3 p.m. – Lou Gehrig Trivia (Bullpen Theater, 1st Floor)
Test your knowledge of Gehrig in this interactive game show. Make your way through nine ‘innings’ of questions, and win a free year-long membership to the Museum.

4 p.m. – “The Pride of the Yankees” (Bullpen Theater, 1st Floor)
A special screening of the 1942 film starring Gary Cooper as Gehrig and featuring Babe Ruth as himself. Gehrig died only one year before its release at the age of 37.

For more information about Lou Gehrig, please visit http://www.baseballhall.org/hof/gehrig-lou.

Girardi marks 1,000th game as Yanks manager

Friday night’s opener of a three-game series against the Rays marked the 1,000th career game as Yankees manager for Joe Girardi. He became the seventh active manager to manage 1,000 games with his current team and the sixth Yankees skipper to go into four figures.

Girardi’s .580 winning percentage based on a 579-420 record entering play Friday night was the highest among the 1,000-game managers, ahead of the Angels’ Mike Scioscia (.543 on 1,247-1,048), the Rangers’ Ron Washington (.538 on 626-537), the Rays’ Joe Maddon (.520 on 690-636), the Giants’ Bruce Bochy (.513 on 596-566) the Twins’ Ron Gardenhire (.512 on 1,010-961) and the Padres’ Buddy Black (.475 on 533-611).

Girardi’s winning percentage ranks fifth on the Yankees’ list of 1,000-plus game managers, behind Joe McCarthy (.627 on 1,460-867), Casey Stengel (.623 on 1,149-696), Joe Torre (.605 on 1,173-767) and Miller Huggins (.597 on 1,067-719) and ahead of Ralph Houk (.539 on 944-806).

Friday also was the 75th anniversary of the end of Lou Gehrig’s streak of 2,130 consecutive games. Gehrig took himself out of the lineup May 2, 1939 at Detroit’s Briggs Stadium, a 22-2 Yankees victory over the Tigers. Babe Dahlgren played first base and had a double and a home run.

Gehrig, who was later diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral schleroris (ALS), did not play another game in the majors and died in 1941, two years after the Baseball Writers’ Association of America voted him into the National Baseball Hall of Fame by acclamation.

Future Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. eventually broke Gehrig’s mark in 1995 and continued the streak to 2,632 before he ended it Sept. 19, 1998 in a game between the Orioles and the Yankees at Baltimore’s Camden Yards.

April 30 — important day in Yankees history

Tuesday is April 30, which is one of the most significant calendar days in Yankees history. The franchise was introduced to New York City on that date 110 years ago, and one of its iconic figures began and ended his career on the same date 16 years apart.

The old Baltimore Orioles club that moved to New York City in 1903 at the start of the third season of the American League became known as the Highlanders because their playing field at the time was located in the highlands area on the Upper West Side of Manhattan that is now the central location of New York-Presbyterian Hospital at West 168th Street.

The Highlanders played their first home game at Hilltop Park April 30, 1903 and defeated the Washington Senators, 6-2. It was the Highlanders’ eighth game of the season and evened their record at 4-4 after opening the season by splitting a four-game series at Washington, D.C., and losing two of three games to the Athletics in Philadelphia.

Managed by future Hall of Famer Clark Griffith and featuring another future Hall of Famer, outfielder Willie Keeler, the team that would become known as the Yankees 10 years later finished with a 72-62 record and fourth of eight teams in the AL.

Moving forward 20 years, the Yankees signed a 19-year-old Columbia University pitcher and outfielder from Manhattan named Henry Louis Gehrig to a professional contract. Lou Gehrig’s reputation as a power hitter was established in the Ivy League, and before the 1923 season was over he made his first appearance in the major leagues. Gehrig got into 13 games that year for the Yanks and batted .423 with four doubles, one triple, one home run and nine RBI in 26 at-bats.

Gehrig spent most of the 1924 season in the minor leagues as well before coming up for good in 1925 and replaced Wally Pipp at first base every day for the next decade and a half. Sixteen years to the day he signed his first pro contract, Gehrig played in his last major-league game, a 3-2 loss to the Senators at Yankee Stadium in which he had 0-for-4. It was Gehrig’s 2,130th consecutive game, a record that stood until Cal Ripken Jr. broke it in September, 1995.

Gehrig was already suffering from the symptoms of arterial lateral sclerosis (ALS), the disease that forced him to out of the next game. May 1 was an open date for the Yankees. Gehrig was in manager Joe McCarthy’s starting batting order for May 2 at Detroit, but the “Iron Horse” took himself out of the lineup and never played again. Gehrig was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1939 and died in 1941.

April 30: Lou’s career beginning to end

The date April 30 was a memorable one for the Yankees and Lou Gehrig at both the start and finish of his Hall of Fame career.

It was on this date in 1923 that Gehrig, 19, a native New Yorker and a pitcher-first baseman at Columbia University, signed a professional contract with the Yankees. At that time, Gehrig was the second greatest player in Columbia’s baseball history. Already a star in the major leagues at that time was White Sox second baseman Eddie Collins, then in his 18th season.

On this same date in 1939, Gehrig played in the last of his 2,130 consecutive games. He went hitless in four at-bats in a 3-2 loss to the Washington Senators at the original Yankee Stadium. The next day was an open date for the Yankees, who traveled to Detroit. Before the May 2 game against the Tigers, Gehrig asked manager Joe McCarthy to remove him from the lineup.

It was later learned that Gehrig was suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The man known as “The Iron Horse” never played another game in the major leagues. The difficult to pronounce disease would soon bear his name as it does today and remains incurable.

At the 1939 Winter Meetings in Cincinnati, the Baseball Writers’ Association of America held a vote to elect Gehrig into the Hall of Fame. The proposal was passed unanimously, but Gehrig was never officially inducted.

Although he is usually listed in the class of 1939, the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies were during that summer when Gehrig was still on the Yankees’ roster. One of those 1939 inductees was Eddie Collins, along with Willie Keeler and George Sisler.

There were no Hall of Fame elections until 1942 when Rogers Hornsby was voted in by the BBWAA. By the time of that induction, however, Gehrig had already died of ALS June 2, 1941 at the age of 37.

The Major League Baseball schedule is made up annually without regard to such coincidences, but this May 2, which is Monday, the Yankees will once again find themselves in Detroit where one of the greatest careers in their franchise’s storied history came to an end.

Hanley Ramirez, the anti-Jeter

The soap opera surrounding Marlins shortstop Hanley Ramirez came to an end for now with his issuing an apology to his teammates Wednesday for loafing after a hit that he had kicked into the left field corner two nights earlier. I say “for now” because when a player treats the game with the disrespect Ramirez did by not hustling to prevent runs from scoring on the hit he is very likely to do it again.

This sort of behavior must come as a surprise to Yankees manager Joe Girardi, who was Florida’s manager in 2006 and ushered Ramirez into the majors. They were award winners that year, Girardi as the National League Manager of the Year and Ramirez as the Jackie Robinson Rookie of the Year.

I remember when they were honored in January 2007 at the New York Baseball Writers Dinner. Girardi was already let go as the Marlins skipper by the time of the event. One of the most poignant moments came when Ramirez, in accepting his award, looked toward Girardi and said, tearfully, “I love you, Joe.”

There was every indication then that Ramirez was a respectful young guy who just might go on to the type of career that Derek Jeter has had for the Yankees. Obviously, that has not happened. Oh, the ability is there. A lot of people think Ramirez is the best shortstop in the NL. He was, after all, runner-up to Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols for the Most Valuable Player Award last year.

Ramirez’s leisurely jaunt for the ball Monday night was bad enough, but he compounded his mistake by ripping his manager, Fredi Gonzalez, who pulled him from the game and then benched him Tuesday night. While it is true that Ramirez had fouled a ball off his lower leg and may have still been hurting, there is no excuse to pursue a ball in that listless a fashion. Give it a try, at least. And if the leg was still barking, Ramirez should have told the manager about it to get a replacement.

Adding insult to injury, Ramirez showed his manager no more respect than he showed his procession, dismissing the discipline from Gonzalez by noting that “he never played in the big leagues.”

I’ve got news for you, Hanley. Neither did Earl Weaver, who took four Orioles teams to the World Series. Neither did Jack McKeon or Jim Leyland or Joe Maddon, who took teams to the World Series this past decade. Neither did Joe McCarthy, who won nine pennants in the 1930s and ’40s, eight with the Yankees. McCarthy and Weaver are in the Hall of Fame. Want me to go on?

Talking with Don Zimmer before Wednesday night’s game at the Stadium, we both came to the same conclusion. What Ramirez pulled the other night is something you would never see from Derek Jeter. Funny, isn’t it, that when the subject of hustle comes up, Jeter is at the top of the list.

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