Results tagged ‘ Mark Teixeira ’

Largest comeback victory of the year for Yanks

The Yankees enjoyed their most impressive comeback of the season Wednesday night as they overcame a 4-0, first-inning deficit to post an 8-5 victory over the Rays. It was the first time all year that the Yankees won a game in which they trailed by as many as four runs. They are 32-3 this season when scoring at least six runs, including victories wins in each of their past 16 such games since June 27.

Yankees relievers combined for 8 2/3 innings to allow only one run, seven hits and a walk with four strikeouts. Their 28 1/3-inning scoreless streak ended with two out in the ninth on a solo home run by Evan Longoria off Esmil Rogers. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, it marked the longest scoreless streak by a Yankees bullpen since July-August 1998 (37 1/3 innings) and had been the longest active streak for relief pitchers on any major-league team. Over the past seven games since Sept. 3, the pen has allowed 14 hits, one earned run, four walks (one intentional) and 29 strikeouts and has a 1.17 ERA over the past 18 games covering 61 1/3 innings.

Preston Claiborne (2 IP, 2H, 1K) earned his third victory of the season. It was his first major-league appearance since June 3 against the Athletics and his first appearance at any level since Aug. 29 for Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Lehigh Valley. . .Chris Capuano gave up four earned runs, four hits and two walks with one strikeout in one-third of an inning, the shortest start of his career. His previous briefest start was 1 1/3 innings Aug. 24, 2004 for the Brewers against the Cubs at Wrigley Field. It marked the shortest outing by a Yankees starter since David Phelps May 29, 2013 against the Mets (1/3 innings, five runs, four earned).

Brian McCann knocked in three runs with a solo homer and a two-run single. Of McCann’s 18 home runs this season, 16 have come at Yankee Stadium. Elias reports that McCann is the second player in franchise history to hit at least 16 of his first 18 home runs for the Yankees in home games, joining Joe Sewell in 1931-33. Elias also noted that McCann is the first major leaguer to hit at least 16 of his first 18 homers with a team at home since the Angels’ Dave Hollins from 1997-98. It was McCann’s third homer of the year on a 0-2 count.

Chris Young played left field and had 3-for-4, including a game-tying home run, his first for the Yankees, in the fourth inning. It was Young’s first home run since July 12 for the Mets against the Marlins at Citi Field. He is just the second player to homer for both the Yankees and Mets in the same season. The other was Dave Kingman, who hit nine home runs for the Mets and four for the Yankees in 1977. Young has four RBI in the past two games. . .Mark Teixeira drove in the go-ahead run in the fifth inning with his 19th career triple.

Derek Jeter (0-for-4) played in his 2,731st career game, surpassing Hall of Fame outfielder Mel Ott for sole possession of eighth place all time among major leaguers who played all of their games with one team. DJ also passed Ott, who played his entire career with the New York Giants, for most games by any New York-based MLB player. Jeter was the designated hitter because Carlos Beltran was scratched from the starting lineup due to right elbow soreness. The Yankees were also without Brett Gardner (strained abdominal muscle) and Martin Prado (left hamstring tightness).

Teixeira, Headley create winning rally with 2 swings

Here I was ready to get on Mark Teixeira for not dropping a bunt to an unoccupied left side as the Red Sox were employing a shift against the first baseman leading off the ninth inning Thursday night with the Yankees down a run. In that situation, it is vital to get a base runner, to start a rally, why not take what the defense allows?

Granted, this is a pet peeve of mine which fans may be tired of hearing. And, of course, now they won’t pay attention to me at all after what happened in what became the latest most important inning this season for the Yankees.

Teixeira swung away throughout his at-bat against Koji Uehara and eventually connected on a 2-2 pitch for a home run to right field that tied the score. Brian McCann, who had homered off Uehara Tuesday night, lined out sharply to left field. Clearly, Uehara was not at his sharpest.

Chase Headley showed that by smoking a 3-2 pitch to right for a walk-off homer producing a 5-4 comeback victory that gave the Yankees a winning series for a change and kept them for falling further behind in the American League wild card chase.

The Yankees had looked pretty limp after they had tied the score with a three-run third. They had only one hit, an infield single, after that into the ninth before Tex and Headley teed off on Uehara, who has given up 10 home runs in 61 1/3 innings this year in which he has not been as lights-out as he was a year ago.

It was Teixeira’s 21st home run of the season but his first in 57 at-bats since Aug. 17. He had that lone hit from the fourth through the eighth and really put a jolt into the crowd with the timely home run.

Headley, who has been a great addition since coming to the Yankees from the Padres in a July trade, failed to get a ball out of the infield before his ninth-inning at-bat in which he battled Uehara tooth and nail.

Credit for this victory also goes to the bullpen. Five relievers took over for Chris Capuano, who gave up two home runs to David Ortiz and one to Brock Holt, and combined to shut down the Red Sox for 4 2/3 innings in which they allowed one hit and one hit batter with four strikeouts.

Winning pitcher Shawn Kelley (3-5) got himself in trouble in the ninth by hitting a batter and bobbling a sacrifice but recovered to get a harmless fly ball and two groundouts that kept the Yankees close enough for the ninth-inning heroics.

Elsewhere, the Mariners were winning big and the Tigers and Indians were in a tight game. A Yankees loss in a game in which the Red Sox were hitless in eight at-bats with runners in scoring position would have been a devastating blow. Instead, they came up with a couple of devastating blows of their own.

With Ellsbury out, Yanks’ attack toothless

In the bottom of the first inning Saturday at Toronto’s Rogers Centre, Michael Pineda gave up a two-run home run to Jose Bautista on a 0-2 pitch. As former sportscaster Warner Wolf used to say, “You could have turned your set off right there.”

The way the game began is the way it ended, 2-0 for the Blue Jays, who went back above .500 (68-67), and a major downer for the Yankees, who managed merely one hit and one threat over the course of nine innings and need a victory in Sunday’s finale for a winning trip.

Probably not coincidental was that the Yankees’ lineup was minus Jacoby Ellsbury, their hottest hitter. The center fielder sprained his left ankle Friday night while sliding home into an out in the ninth inning. His ankle apparently slammed into a shinguard of catcher Dioner Navarro. Ellsbury played the field in the bottom of the ninth but was too sore to play Saturday. Whether he can return to the lineup Sunday remains to be seen.

Ellsbury has struggled on the road much of the season but not during this trip through Kansas City, Detroit and Toronto. He is batting .440 with six runs, one triple, four home runs, nine RBI and two stolen bases in 25 at-bats. Over his past 11 games and 44 at-bats, Ellsbury is batting .455 with eight runs, one double, one triple, four homers,11RBI and six stolen bases.

Yet as several players pointed out to reporters in the clubhouse afterwards, the loss of one player should not shut down a whole team. Drew Hutchison, who had lost three of his four stars with a 7.08 ERA this year against the Yankees entering the game, did not allow a base runner until two out in the fourth inning when he hit Carlos Beltran with a pitch. Mark Teixeira doubled to right-center, which turned out to be the Yankees’ only hit. Hutchison loaded the bags when he struck Brian McCann with a pitch, but Martin Prado flied out to center.

And that was that. The Yankees had only two base runners after that, both on walks. It was a tough fate for Pineda, who gave the Yankees another fine outing. The righthander pitched two batters into the seventh inning and gave up seven hits with no walks and three strikeouts. In four starts since missing 86 games because of a right shoulder injury, Pineda is 1-1 with a 2.31 ERA, one walk and 15 strikeouts in 23 1/3 innings.

Surrendering a home run to Bautista is no great crime. The Jays right fielder has 28 of them this year and has homered in each of his past four games. It was also his 23rd career home run against the Yankees. Pineda got in trouble in the seventh after yielding a single to Edwin Encarnacion and a double to Navarro. But Shawn Kelley came to the rescue by striking out Danny Valencia and getting Kevin Pillar on a grounder and Jose Reyes on a fly ball. David Huff also supplied a shutout inning of relief, but the offense was shut out for nine.

This important trip has had its highs and lows, among them the setback in his desire to pitch again this season for Masahiro Tanaka. He pitched a simulated game Thursday in Detroit and was sent back to New York after reporting general arm soreness, which is not unusual in recovery situations such as his. The one positive element is that the soreness was not related to his elbow that was treated for a partial ligament tear. Just the same, odds of his pitching at all for the Yanks this season were greatly reduced.

All Yanks join Ellsbury in hit parade

No sooner had Jacoby Ellsbury reached first base with a leadoff single in the third inning Wednesday night at Detroit that I said to myself, “Anyone else on this team want to help this guy?”

Ellsbury had accounted for both Yankees runs in Tuesday night’s 5-2 loss with solo home runs and opened Wednesday’s game with a single and a stolen base but was stranded at second base.

I do not claim any penchant for mental telepathy, but I may have transmitted something across to the rest of the Yankees because all they did an entire turn through the batting order that inning was follow Ellsbury’s lead and reach base with hits.

It was a manager’s absolute dream as Joe Girardi watched each player he placed in the lineup knock his way on base. Ellsbury’s speed got him a second steal as he outran a pickoff. Derek Jeter brought him home with a double as the parade began, followed by a single by Martin Prado, a double by Mark Teixeira and singles by Carlos Beltran, Brian McCann, Chase Headley, Brett Gardner and Francisco Cervelli. Not only did the Yankees get nine hits in a row but also eight straight with runners in scoring position, which in some cases this year has been a series worth of clutch hits.

And that was no tomato can on the mound off of whom the Yankees got nine consecutive hits, two shy of the Rockies’ major league mark against the Cubs in 2010. The Detroit starter was none other than 2012 American League Cy Young Award winner David Price, who entered the game with a 10-5 career record against the Yankees.

Price never did get an out that inning. Tigers manager Brad Ausmus yanked him for another lefthander, Blaine Hardy, who gave up two more runs on sacrifice flies by Ellsbury and Jeter as the Yankees swelled their lead to 8-0.

Remember how excited the Yankees were Monday night when they scored eight runs against the Royals with James Shields starting? Well, this time they scored that many runs in just one inning.

Ellsbury certainly looks comfortable back in the leadoff spot where he batted most often in his years with the Red Sox. Girardi has had to use him in the 3-hole much of this year because of the inconsistency and injuries to Mark Teixeira and Carlos Beltran.

Usual leadoff man Gardner was out the first two games of the trip because of a right ankle bruise. He was back Wednesday night but dropped to the 8-hole because of his career problems against Price (2-for-20 entering play).

With two hits, two stolen bases and an RBI over his first three plate appearances, Ellsbury definitely was a table setter. Yet for a change he had plenty of support.

As appreciative as Girardi for all this offense was Yanks starter Shane Greene, who did not give up a hit or a run until the fourth inning. The righthander did not pitch as it he had a huge lead but rather as if the score was close, the best approach for a pitcher to take.

Green gave up two runs, five hits and one walk with a hit batter and eight strikeouts in seven innings to remain undefeated in eight starts since July 21 and improve his record to 4-1 with a 3.09 ERA.

The big-inning victory also did the Yanks quite a bit of good in the standings. They picked up a game on the Orioles in the American League East and now trail by six and sliced a game off the deficit for the second wild card spot to 2 1/2 games behind the Mariners and two behind the Tigers.

Yanks end bumpy trip on upbeat note

So when is a 2-3 trip considered good? When it starts out 0-3.

That was the situation with the Yankees at the end of a somewhat bumpy ride through Baltimore and St. Petersburg. They finished in an upbeat fashion Sunday with a 4-2 victory that included a semblance of a sustained offense and an encouraging outing by Hiroki Kuroda.

The victory also lifted the Yankees back into second place in the American League East, albeit a distant second since they trail the first-place Orioles by seven games. The Yanks are also 3 1/2 games behind in the chase for the second wild-card berth.

Kuroda was working on extra rest, which is something Yankees manager Joe Girardi intends to do as often as he can in the season’s final six weeks to prevent the fade the Japanese righthander sustained in the second half of the 2013 season. He certainly seemed to benefit from the extra time off.

Never before at his best against the Rays (2-4, 6.07 ERA) or at Tropicana Field (1-2, 6.94 ERA), Kuroda was in first-half form with 6 2/3 innings in which he allowed two runs and four hits. Pitching to contact (one walk, one strikeout), Kuroda retired 17 batters in a row from the first through the sixth innings.

Kuroda gave up a run in the first inning, and that run looked quite large when Rays righthander Jeremy Hellickson, who has pitched only since last month after undergoing arthroscopic right elbow surgery in January, took a no-hitter into the fifth inning and got the first two out then rather easily.

A walk to Stephen Drew was the beginning of a sloppy inning for Hellickson, his last in the game, as the Yankees strung together four hits — a double by Martin Prado, a two-run single by Brett Gardner that gave the Yankees the lead, followed by singles by Derek Jeter and Jacoby Ellsbury resulting in another run. The hit by Ellsbury was his only one on the trip in 20 at-bats but came at a good time. Prado also had a superlative game defensively at second base with eight assists and one putout.

Evan Longoria’s RBI single in the seventh off a tiring Kuroda cut the Yanks’ lead to 3-2, but Shawn Kelley stranded a runner at third before turning matters over to Dellin Betances in the eighth and David Robertson (33rd save) in the ninth, which has become a can’t-miss tandem.

Mark Teixeira made it 4-2 in the eighth with his 20th home run of the season and career No. 361, which tied him with Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio on the all-time list. Nice company that.

So the trip’s finish was far better than the start. The Yankees’ offense continues to be a concern. They averaged merely 2.6 runs per game on the trip and have been outscored by 37 runs this season.

But they come home with some momentum and have a chance to make some headway on the upcoming homestand against the also-ran Astros and White Sox.

Crowd bemoans off day for Jeter

Thursday was one of those days when manager Joe Girardi is not the most popular guy at Yankee Stadium. An afternoon crowd on a postcard day watched the Yankees take the field without Derek Jeter.

In the Captain’s last major-league season, many fans come to the Stadium hoping to see Jeter in person one more time before his retirement. It might be the only home game they attend all year.

Jeter, who at 3,429 hits is one behind Hall of Famer Honus Wagner for sixth place on the career list, has been incredibly versatile in his final season with 101 games played of the Yankees’ 113 entering Thursday, but he cannot play every day. At 40, he needs an occasional day off, and it Girardi who has to play bad guy to the fans by keeping him on the bench once in a while.

The rare non-start allowed Stephen Drew to return to his more familiar position at shortstop with utility-man Brendan Ryan at second base. Since Drew is being counted on this season to play second base, I was surprised by the alignment. One would think the more Drew plays second base the more comfortable he would become. Girardi’s reasoning was that at this point in their careers Ryan, an excellent defensive shortstop as well, has played more often than Drew at second base. Naturally, it might also be a peak into next season if the Yankees are considering re-signing Drew, who can become a free agent at season’s end, to be Jeter’s successor at shortstop.

First baseman Mark Teixeira, who required three stitches to heal a wound to his left pinky injured in a slide at the plate in Wednesday night’s 5-1 victory over the Tigers, was also out of the lineup. Chase Headley, who has proved a valuable addition since coming over in a trade from the Padres, played first base in Tex’s absence with another relative newcomer, Martin Prado, coming in from the outfield to play third base. That opened up a start for Ichiro Suzuki in right field.

Yanks finish 2-1 vs. Cy Young pitchers

Those of us in the press box had to be on the alert Wednesday night. I cannot recall a time when so many foul balls were hit in our direction. That’s usually a sign of hitters being unable to get around with the bat against a pitcher with exceptional stuff.

It came as no surprise because the pitcher was Justin Verlander, the 2011 American League Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Award winner who has had something of a star-crossed season this year. Verlander entered the game with a surprisingly high ERA (4.66), but he seemed the ace of recent vintage this night.

When not fouling pitches back on a regular basis, the Yankees were making out after out against Verlander until Jacoby Ellsbury broke up his no-hit bid with a two-out single to center field in the fourth inning.

Chase Headley, who has been a fine addition to the Yankees, finally got through to Verlander with one out in the fifth with a drive into the second deck in right field for the third baseman’s second home run since joining the Yankees and ninth of the season.

That made the score 1-1. The Tigers had touched Chris Capuano for a gift run in the first inning. Rajai Davis reached first base on an error by Derek Jeter and second on a wild pitch by Capuano before there was an out. Davis crossed to third on an infield out and scored on Miguel Cabrera’s flyout to the warning track in right field.

Capuano got help from Ellsbury to keep the game tied in the sixth. The center fielder leaped high to glove J.D. Martinez’s drive to right-center at the top of the wall in front of the Yankees’ bullpen for the third out of the inning.

Capuano more than held his own against Verlander. The lefthander had eight strikeouts, twice as many as his opponent into the seventh inning, and only one walk. He came out of the game after giving up two-out singles by Andrew Romine and Ezequiel Carrera in the seventh. Adam Warren retired Davis on a grounder to the right side for the third out. Capuano has pitched to a 2.48 ERA in 19 inning since joining the Yankees.

It was a shame he was out of the game when Brian McCann’s 13th home run gave the Yankees a 2-1 lead in the bottom of the seventh. Capuano had pitched well enough to earn a victory, but the run put Warren in place for the winning decision instead.

Warren’s shining moment came in the eighth when the game nearly came unglued for the Yanks after a dual error by second baseman Stephen Drew on a ground ball by Victor Martinez gave the Tigers runners on first and third with one out. Warren fell behind 3-0 in the count to the next two hitters but came back to set down both of them. He used a pair of 96-mph fastballs to strike out J.D. Martinez and finished off Nick Castellanos on a routine fly ball to right field.

Verlander was gone after seven, and the Yankees pushed their lead to 5-1 in the eighth against lefthander Blaine Hardy. Mark Teixeira drove in a run with a single and was the second runner to score on an errant throw to first base by Romine, the shortstop, on a call overturned after a video replay.

Teixeira turned out a casualty. He cut his right pinky on catcher Bryan Holaday’s spikes and required stitches. Tex will not play Thursday’s series finale and could be lost for even more time.

That was the one negative drawback in an otherwise positive night for the Yankees, whose string of games decided by two runs or fewer ended at 16.

The Yankees came out on the plus side (2-1) of their three match-ups against former Cy Young Award winners, and they now have a winning career record (6-5) against Verlander, who has not beaten them in two years.

Yankees pitching has been particularly good in this series against the Tigers, who lead the AL in batting but have scored only six runs in 30 innings the past three games.

Yanks mantra: Have glove(s), will travel

One thing about the Yankees this year: the players need to have more than one glove. It was another night of musical chairs for the Yankees in the field Monday against the Tigers.

First baseman Mark Teixeira reported light-headedness just before game time, resulting in a lineup change. Chase Headley moved from third base over to Tex’s spot at first base. Martin Prado moved in from right field to play third base with Ichiro Suzuki starting instead in right.

Also working on a new position is recently-acquired Stephen Drew at second base. A shortstop by trade, Drew has moved to the right side of the infield. He was working intently with first base coach Mick Kelleher, who tutors the infielders, before the game. They concentrated most on making the back-handed pivot to the shortstop covering second and the step-over at second base on double plays.

Even though a newcomer to the position, Drew is already an upgrade defensively over Brian Roberts, who was designated for assignment last week. Headley has also played a solid third base as the Yankees’ infield overall has improved markedly since the recent trades.

Teixeira to miss 3-4 days with strained lat

Just when the Yankees have gotten on a roll, Mark Teixeira has had to come out of the lineup. Tex has been bothered on and off the past two weeks by back spasms. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam revealed a mild strain of the left lat. The first baseman does not have to do on the 15-day disabled list, but he is not likely to play in the four-game series against the Rangers that began Monday night.

Teixeira said before the game that he thought the condition would improve with the four-day layoff of the All-Star break. Instead, it got worse.

“The same thing happened last year when I came back after missing so much time the previous year,” Teixeira said. “You think you’re going to find a fountain of youth, but the time away made me rusty.”

Teixeira certainly looked rusty during the Yankees’ sweep of the Reds by going hitless with one walk and five strikeouts in 12 at-bats. He was to receive a plasma injection from Dr. Chris Ahmad, the Yankees team physician, before the game. The Yankees are hopeful Teixeira may return in three or four days.

Sometimes it’s easy being Greene

The Yankees’ rotation has had an overhaul this season with four-fifths of the Opening Day starting unit gone to the disabled list. The situation has afforded opportunities to some pitchers. Shane Greene is one who has given the Yankees reason to believe they just might get through this crisis.

The Floridian righthander earned his first major-league victory earlier in the week at Cleveland and followed it up Saturday with an even more impressive performance at Baltimore. Greene’s 7 2/3 innings of shutout ball in the Yankees’ 3-0 victory was quite a showing in the hitting paradise that is Camden Yards.

Just as he did last Monday night against the Indians, Greene had his sinker working as few balls hit by the Orioles made their way to the outfield. Other than their four hits, all singles, only two other batted balls by the Birds were outfield flies. Green got 10 outs on infield grounders and another on an infield popup. Oh, yeah, he also totaled nine strikeouts. Nelson Cruz, who entered the game tied for the major league lead in home runs (28) and RBI (74), went down on strikes three times.

This was an outing similar to what we have seen this year from another rookie righthander, Masahiro Tanaka. There will be no suggestion here that Greene is the equivalent of the Japanese phenom, but the Triple A Scranton call-up has proved a worthy substitute trying to work his way into the Yankees’ plans.

Greene did not allow a hit until two outs in the fifth inning. Manny Machado broke up the no-hit bid with a single to left, and Ryan Flaherty followed with a single to center that sent Machado to third base.

The score was 1-0 at that point, so it was a juncture when Greene might have wavered. Instead, he kept the Orioles off the board with a strikeout of Nick Hundley, the same guy whose 10th-inning single Friday night did in the Yankees.

The Orioles threatened again in the sixth when Nick Markakis and Steve Pearce began the inning with well-struck singles. If Greene ever needed a ground ball, this was the time. He got it, too, in the direction of Brian Roberts, who gloved it near second base, got to the bag for the force and made an off-balanced throw to first base for a rally-injuring double play. Greene supplied the killing blow by striking out Cruz.

The Yankees then supported their young pitcher in a way they have not been doing in recent games in which they have often taken early leads but have not tacked on runs later on. Orioles starter Chris Tillman kept pace with Greene for six innings. The Yankees scored a run in the third on a double by Mark Teixeira but lost another run when Derek Jeter was thrown out at the plate.

In the seventh, a pair of two-out hits, a single by Jeter off Tillman and a double by Jacoby Ellsbury off reliever T.J. McFarland, gave the Yanks two key insurance run. Brian McCann’s third hit of the game almost got another run in, but a strong throw to the plate by center fielder Adam Jones nailed Ellsbury.

It was encouraging to see the Yankees put together a sustained attack in the late innings, but as it turned out one run was all Greene needed. After he got the first out of the eighth, Greene was removed for lefthander David Huff, who gave up a single to Nick Markakis. Shawn Kelley got the final two outs of the inning before David Robertson finished it off with a perfect ninth for his 23rd save.

So after two brilliant starts, Greene is 2-0 with a 1.32 ERA and has given the Yankees hope that there may be more good stuff to come.

“He’s stepping up; that’s for sure,” Girardi told reporters. “He’s earning starts is what he’s doing.”

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