Results tagged ‘ Mark Teixeira ’

Yanks stop Mets’ winning streak away from Citi

By jumping all over Jacob deGrom early Friday night, the Yankees took some of the buzz out of the highly-anticipated opening of the first round of this season’s Subway Series. They had a six-run lead by the third inning and coasted to a 6-1 victory that put an end to the Mets’ 11-game winning streak, which tied a franchise record.

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, Friday night at Yankee Stadium marked the first time in the 19 seasons of inter-league play that the Yankees and the Mets faced each other while owning at least a share of first place in their respective divisions. At 13-3, the Mets had the best record in the major leagues atop the National League East while the 9-7 Yankees were tied with the Red Sox for the American League East lead.

There was the usual buzz in the crowd leading up to the game’s start after Bernie Williams tossed the ceremonial first pitch (more like a lob, actually).

Yankees starter Michael Pineda got off a good start with a scoreless first inning with two strikeouts. DeGrom was not so fortunate. The righthander entered the game with a 2-1 record and a 0.93 ERA. The 2014 NL Jackie Robinson Rookie of the Year made an impressive debut last year against the Yankees at Citi Field.

Mark Teixeira, who has not been as imposing from the left side of the plate as from the right, turned that situation around. Tex drove a 2-1 pitch into the second deck in right field for a two-run home run that showed the Mets they were no longer at Citi Field. It ended an 18-inning scoreless streak by deGrom.

Teixeira struck again in the third inning but not before Jacoby Ellsbury led off with his first home run of the season. Brett Gardner did deGrom a favor by getting thrown out at second base trying to stretch a single into a double.

After Alex Rodriguez walked, Teixeira went deep again to right field for another two-run blast. It marked the 38th multi-homer game of Tex’s career.

The Yankees were not finished scoring that inning. They loaded the bases on singles by Brian McCann and Chase Headley surrounding a walk to Carlos Beltran. Stephen Drew pushed the Yanks’ lead to 6-0 with a sacrifice fly.

Teixeira had the opportunity to do more damage when he came up with the bases loaded and none out in the sixth, but he fouled out to third against Hansel Robles, a hard-throwing righthander who made an impressive big-league debut by turning the Yanks away with strikeouts of McCann and Beltran.

That was probably the highlight of the game for the Mets. That is how dominant the Yankees were in ending the Mets’ franchise-record-equaling winning streak. The Yankees continued their role and have won nine of their past 12 games.

Pineda ran his record to 3-0, equaling the mark of teammate Dellin Betances, who was not needed Friday night. Pineda worked into the eighth inning and only hurt himself with a wild pitch that pushed Curtis Granderson into scoring position. A sacrifice fly by Lucas Duda in the sixth inning was the only blemish for Pineda, who lowered his ERA to 3.86. He allowed five hits and no walks with seven strikeouts in 7 2/3 innings. Of his 100 pitches, 78 were for strikes.

“We’ve turned it around,” manager Joe Girardi said. “We have swung the bats well. We’re pitching well. Our defense is doing what we thought it was capable of.”

Yankees pitchers styming Tigers’ imposing lineup

The imposing Detroit lineup that is among the strongest in the major leagues has not been much of a match against Yankees pitching the past two nights. Although the clubs have divided the first two games of the four-game series, the Yankees have been impressive with their mound work.

One night after CC Sabathia was hung with a tough loss in a 2-1 complete game, Nathan Eovaldi earned his first victory with the Yankees on the strength of seven-plus solid innings in which he allowed merely one run as well. The Tigers brought some drama to the game in the bottom of the ninth with a run on a bases-loaded walk, but Andrew Miller ended the 5-2 Yankees victory with a strikeout.

Eovaldi found out that the double play is indeed a pitcher’s best friend as the Yankees turned four twin killings behind him. The righthander with the power arm spaced out eight hits and one walk and got four strikeouts in an outing that took him one batter into the eighth inning. That alone was a good sign for Eovaldi, who threw 101 pitches over five innings in his previous start.

Eovaldi has his usual high-octane fastball but kept the Tigers off balance with a biting slider that proved his most effective pitch. His one hiccup came in the seventh inning, a wild pitch that put J.D. Martinez on third base from where he scored on a fly ball to center by Yoenis Cespedes. A sacrifice fly and a bases-loaded walk accounted for the runs by the Tigers, who entered play with a team .303 batting average and averaging 6.4 runs per game. Detroit was hitless in nine at-bats with runners in scoring position.

The Yankees were only 1-for-11 in such situations and scored one run in six innings against Tigers starter Kyle Lobstein on a two-out, opposite-field double in the first by Mark Teixeira. But the soft underbelly of the Tigers is their bullpen. Chris Young and Stephen Drew poled solo home runs in the seventh off lefthander Ian Krol, and righthander Al Albuquerque wild-pitched home another run. An error by Tigers third baseman Nick Castellanos gift-wrapped a Yankees run in the ninth.

Young had three hits and is now batting .344 with four home runs. He is making a strong case for himself as an alternative against left-handed pitching instead of switch hitter Carlos Beltran, who was on the bench Tuesday night. Detroit is throwing another lefty Wednesday night, David Price, so expect Young out there again with Girardi perhaps giving one of his left-handed outfielders, Jacoby Ellsbury or Brett Gardner, the night off.

In two nights at Comerica Park, Yankees pitchers have held the offensive-roaring Tigers to four runs. Detroit has 17 hits, although only three for extra bases, all doubles. Miguel Cabrera, normally a Yankees killer (.338 career average, 18 home runs, 46 RBI) is 1-for-7 and has grounded into two double plays in the series.

It is up to Adam Warren Wednesday night to keep the effective pitching coming for the Yankees.

Teixeira crosses up shift for RBI in 4th straight game

Defensive shifts are designed to steal hits, but sometimes they can backfire. That was the case for the Yankees in the first inning Tuesday night at Detroit. Mark Teixeira crossed up the Tigers’ defense, and the Yankees got a run out of it.

Tex came to the plate batting right-handed against lefthander Kyle Lobstein with two out and Brett Gardner on first base. The Tigers were over-shifted to the left side, including the outfielders, who shaded him well to the left.

Teixeira jumped on a high fastball and punched to right field. With right fielder J.D. Martinez stationed in right-center, he had a ways to go to retrieve the ball, which allowed the speedy Gardner to score all the way from first base.

Teixeira has an RBI in four straight games and nine of his past 11. He is one of three major-league hitters with an RBI in at least nine games, along with the Royals’ Salvador Perez and the Mets’ Travis d’Arnaud, who just went on the disabled list. The previous Yankees hitter with at least one RBI in at least eight-or-more of the club’s first 13 games was Derek Jeter (eight games) in 2012. Eight of Teixeira’s nine hits have been for extra bases (four doubles, four home runs).

Yanks can’t prevent Tigers from late-inning comeback

The Yankees tried to carry the momentum of an uplifting weekend at Tampa Bay into Detroit, but the regenerated offense failed to follow them. They scored merely one run Monday night, a total seldom enough to prevail against the Tigers’ powerhouse.

And yet it almost was this time with CC Sabathia on the mound dealing with a hard-breaking slider and a tantalizing changeup to go with a fastball that occasionally rang in the low 90s. It also helped that the Yankees played exceptionally in the field and ran down several well-struck balls to the outfield.

Sabathia faced the minimum number of batters through the first six innings working with a 1-0 lead supplied by Mark Teixeira’s solo home run (No. 4) in the second inning off Alfredo Simon, who kept the Tigers close in not allowing a run after that.

The Tigers did not get a runner into scoring position until the seventh inning when they turned the game around into their favor. Rajai Davis led off with a single and raced to second after tagging up on Ian Kinsler flyout to deep left field. Miguel Cabrera, who grounded into double plays his first two times up, again hit the ball to the left side. Shortstop Didi Gregorius took a chance throwing the ball to second base in an attempt to trap Davis off the bag, but his throw was saved by second baseman Stephen Drew, who was able to get the second out of the inning by throwing to first base to get the plodding Cabrera.

The Yankees decided to walk Victor Martinez intentionally, which made sense with an open base and the designated hitter having hit the ball sharply in his first two at-bats with nothing to show for it. 

J.D. Martinez is no day at the beach, either, and he proved that with a slashing single off Gregorius’ glove in the hole that scored Davis with the tying run. Detroit grabbed the lead on a single up the middle by Yoenis Cespedes. J.D. Martinez headed for third base hoping to draw a throw to allow the slower Victor Martinez to score from second.

It worked, too. Jacoby Ellsbury threw to third base. While J.D. Martinez was eventually tagged out for the third out, Victor Martinez had already crossed the plate with what proved the deciding run.

Do not fault Ellsbury for the move. Cespedes’ grounder hit the lip of the grass behind second base, which slowed the ball down as the center fielder playing deep was charging. I doubt Ellsbury’s throw to the plate was certain to nail Victor Martinez.

The 2-1 Tigers lead would hold up because a familiar figure to Yankees fans pitched out of a jam in the eighth. With runners on first and third and one out, Joba Chamberlain came out of the bullpen to face Ellsbury, who hit the ball hard but into a rally-killing double play. 

There may be some second-guessing about a play before the DP when third base coach Joe Espada held Chase Headley at third base rather than waving him home from second base on a single to center by Gregorius. What Espada could not anticipate was that Davis, the Detroit center fielder, would bobble the ball for a moment before recovering a firing a bullet to the infield. Headley was no cinch to score in that spot, so I cannot fault the third base coach for playing it safe.

Joakim Soria made it 5-for-5 in saves with a scoreless ninth inning as the Tigers improved to 11-2 while the Yankees fell below .500 again at 6-7.

It was a tough loss for Sabathia, who looked a lot like the CC of old in the first complete game for a Yankees starter this season. To hold the Tigers to two runs and seven hits through eight innings is quite a feat. His record fell to 0-3, but the Yankees have every reason to be encouraged.

Sweep has Yanks motoring into Motor City

After limping out of Baltimore where they lost two of three games to begin the current trip, the Yankees got upright at Tampa Bay. Did they ever.

Their first sweep of a series of three or more games at Tropicana Field in nearly 10 years was just the antidote the Yankees needed to move on to Detroit where they will play the team with the best record (10-2) in the major leagues over the next four days. After that, they pair up against the club with the best current mark in the National League, the 10-3 Mets back at Yankee Stadium for the first round of the Subway Series.

The Yankees’ offense came alive and their bullpen thrived in the three games at St. Petersburg, Fla., against a Tampa Bay club that has given them trouble in recent years. Since Sept. 2, 2011, the Yankees are 26-37 against the Rays. Tampa Bay has not lost a season series to the Yankees since 2009 and are 52-43 since.

The Rays are dealing with some major injuries, which is why it was all the more pivotal for the Yankees to take advantage of them and get their own record back to .500 at 6-6. The Yanks batted .268 over the three games with three doubles, three triples and three home runs. They averaged 6.3 runs per game and hit .333 (7-for-21) with runners in scoring position.

Conversely, the Yankees pitching staff limited Tampa Bay to one hit in 17 at-bats (.059) with runners in scoring positions. The Rays were a combined 0-for-14 in that department Saturday night and Sunday. The usually dangerous Evan Longoria was merely 1-for-10 (.100) in the series.

Masahiro Tanaka had a brilliant start Saturday night following a shaky one Friday night by Adam Warren. Michael Pineda was just okay Sunday, but the bullpen made up for lapses in the rotation. The Yankees’ relief corps was not scored upon in 10 1/3 innings during which it allowed only five hits and four walks with 15 strikeouts. 

After the 9-0 rout Saturday, the Yankees were in a tight game most of Sunday and emerged on top by a 5-3 score. They got a run right off the bat against Matt Andriese, but the Rays shot back with two runs in the bottom of the first inning on a home run by Steven Souza Jr. The Yankees regained the lead with a four-hit third inning and kept it despite Pineda’s inconsistency.

Dellin Betances worked out of a jam in the seventh, then pitched a scoreless eighth to hand the baton to Andrew Miller, who picked up his fourth save by striking out the side after having yielded a leadoff double.

At the top of the order Jacoby Ellsbury and Brett Gardner were on base a combined five times and scored two runs. Alex Rodriguez also scored two runs and hit a scorching double. Chase Headley knocked in two runs with a double and a single. Mark Teixeira also had two RBI with a sacrifice fly and a productive infield out. Garrett Jones, playing right field for ailing Carlos Beltan (cold), had three hits, including a triple, and Didi Gregorius contributed a pair of singles.

The result was the Yankees’ first sweep of a series of three or more games in St. Pete since Sept. 9-13, 2005 and their first overall since a three-gamer Aug. 22-24 last year against the White Sox.

Now it is off to Comerica Park, which has been another horror house for the Yankees. They are 6-10 there since May 3, 2011 and 28-32 overall since the park opened in 2000. The Yanks are 1-4-1 in their last six series in Detroit since 2010 and were 1-4 combined in postseason games there in 2011 and ’12.

The Yankees do catch a break in the coming series in that they will have not have to face former teammate Shane Green, who won again Sunday to push his record to 3-0. The righthander, who went to Detroit in the three-team trade that sent Gregorius to the Bronx from Arizona, has allowed only one earned run and two overall in 23 innings for an ERA of 0.39. Green has allowed 12 hits and five walks with 11 strikeouts.

It looks as if the Yankees are finally running into some luck.

Bullpen springs a major leak

The most consistent positive for the Yankees in the early going has been the bullpen. Wednesday night, it leaked and cost the Yankees a chance to win their first series of the season.

The pen coughed up a one-run lead in the sixth inning as the Orioles put up a five-spot against three Yankees relievers to take control of the game and go on to a 7-5 victory, which dropped the Bombers’ record to 3-6.

Nathan Eovaldi had nine strikeouts in five innings, but he gave up eight hits and three walks, which along with the Ks shot his pitch count up to 101. The hard-throwing righthander needs to find a way to be more economical with his pitching.

The bullpen ranked third in the majors with a 1.73 ERA entering play and had limited opposing hitters to a .177 batting average. In addition, the pen was fairly well rested, but it did not take long for the tide to turn.

Jonathan Schoop led off the bottom of the sixth with a home run to center field off David Carpenter that tied the score. Alejandro De Aza followed with a single. Everth Cabrera sacrificed De Aza to second base. It seemed as if Orioles manager Buck Showalter was playing small-ball, but it would soon turn into a big-ball inning for Baltimore.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi ordered an intentional walk to Adam Jones, the Orioles’ hottest hitter (.406, 4 home runs, 11 RBI) from Carpenter and then brought in lefthander Justin Wilson to face left-hitting Travis Snider and Chris Davis. But Showalter countered with righty-swinging Delmon Young, who singled to left as a pinch hitter for Snider to score De Aza. The sac bunt proved crucial, as it turned out.

Davis, who struck out eight times in the series and could not catch up with Wilson’s fastball early in the at-bat, took a slider to the opposite field for a two-run double. Righthander Chris Martin tried to stem the tide but gave up a two-out, RBI single to Chad Joseph, who had three hits in the game and drove the Yanks crazy in the series going 7-for-11 (.636) with a triple and two RBI.

The Yankees came back Monday night against shaky Tommy Hunter and nearly did the same by scoring two runs off him in the eighth on doubles by Chris Young and Mark Teixeira and a wild pitch, but they would get no closer than that.

That Yankees bullpen ERA rose more than a run to 2.75 and the opponents’ batting average went up to .210. One good sign out of the bullpen came from Dellin Betances, who worked a scoreless, one-hit eighth inning with two strikeouts.

CC still winless but making progress

CC Sabathia, coming back from knee surgery, has shown positive signs in his first two outings, but both have been losses. The second came Tuesday night at Baltimore as the Orioles held off a late challenge by the Yankees for a 4-3 victory.

Sabathia fell into a 3-0 hole after four innings. Adam Jones, as hot a player as there is in the major leagues these days, took CC deep in the first inning for his fourth home run and made the score 2-0 with a sacrifice fly two innings later. A wild pitch by Sabathia helped set up the third Baltimore run on a two-out single by Caleb Joseph, the Orioles catcher who got his first career triple leading off the seventh inning and scored on a sacrifice fly by Everth Cabrera.

That made the score 4-1 and ended Sabathia’s night. He was ticked for four runs and seven hits but walked only one batter and struck out seven. Mobility remains a problem for the big guy with the tender knee. He made a throwing error trying to toss the ball from his glove to first base and also failed to cover the bag on another play that fortunately did not prove costly.

Manager Joe Girardi gave Sabathia a passing grade and is still optimistic that the lefthander can be a major positive force on the staff. CC just ran into a pitcher who was better Tuesday night.

Orioles righthander Miguel Gonzalez limited the Yankees to one run, four hits and one walk in seven innings and had a career-high strikeout total of 10. Gonzalez only hurt himself in the fifth inning with a wild pitch that put Jacoby Ellsbury into scoring position, and Mark Teixeira obliged with a two-out double.

The Yanks closed to 4-3 in the eighth against reliever Kevin Gausman with left fielder Alejandro De Aza making a huge error off a drive by Teixeira. Orioles manager Buck Showalter went to his closer, Zach Britton, for a four-out save after the De Aza error made it a one-run game with the potential tying run in scoring position. Britton did his job by getting four ground-ball outs to keep the Yankees from getting their record to .500.

The Yankees were without Brett Gardner, whose left wrist is still smarting after being hit by a pitch Monday night. Chris Young played left field and had a double in four at-bats. Girardi indicated that Gardner likely won’t start again until Friday at St. Petersburg, Fla.

Yanksees get a jump start in road opener

A nice combination of speed and power brought the Yankees back from a 4-2 deficit Monday night in the seventh inning at Camden Yards on the way to an impressive 6-5 victory.

Orioles lefthander Wei-Yin Chen limited the Yankees to two runs over six innings on solo home runs by Chris Young and Mark Teixeira and was thrust into the lead when Adam Jones connected for a two-run homer off Michael Pineda in the bottom of the sixth that unlocked a 2-2 score.

Tommy Hunter, Baltimore’s hard-throwing righthander, came on in the seventh, and the Yankees were ready for him. Young started things off with a single, and John Ryan Murphy worked a walk on a full count.

Curiously, Orioles manager Buck Showalter had lefthander Brian Matusz warming in the bullpen but did not bring him on to face left-handed Garrett Jones, pinch hitting for Gregorio Petit. After Jones flied to left for the second out, Matusz remained in the pen as lefty-swinging Jacoby Ellsbury came up against Hunter.

Here was the speed part of the rally. Ellsbury hit a slow roller to second base and beat the play at first base for a single that filled the bags. Brett Gardner was due up but was held back because of a swollen right wrist.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi went with Stephen Drew as the pinch hitter and looked like a genius when Drew worked the count to 3-1 and then drove a fastball over the center field wall for a grand slam and a 6-4 Yankees advantage. That was the power part.

Michael Pineda put the lead in jeopardy when he gave up two singles in the bottom of the seventh. Dellin Betances relieved Betances with one out and gave up another single that loaded the bases. A run scored on a fielder’s choice that the Yanks failed to convert into a double play, but a fine stop at first base by Teixeira protected the lead.

Betances walked Steve Pearce, which re-loaded the bags for the Orioles, but rebounded to fit the golden sombrero on Chris Davis, who suffered his fourth strikeout of the game, this one on a nasty slider.

Pineda was more hittable than Yankees fans are accustomed to seeing. He allowed nine hits in 6 1/3 innings but did not walk a batter and struck out nine.

Nor was Betances what Yankees fans have gotten used to seeing. He gave up two hits and a couple of walks in his inning of work with only 10 of his 24 pitches going for strikes. Betances was aided in the eighth when catcher John Ryan Murphy threw out Adam Jones, who had led off with a single, trying to steal second base.

After Betances walked Travis Snider, Girardi also went against convention and brought in lefthander Andrew Miller to face two right-handed hitters, Manny Machado and Jonathan Scoop. Both struck out. Miller withstood hitting a batter with two out in the ninth to notch his second save and give the Yankees their first winning streak of the year.

It was a good night for Girardi moves.

Yanks stagger Saturday after Friday marathon loss

Saturday’s 8-4 loss to the Red Sox had all the trappings of a classic hangover game for the Yankees. Less than 12 hours after they were beaten, 6-5, in 19 innings, the Yankees were back at Yankee Stadium for another joust with Boston and looked very much like a team that was sleep-walking.

Granted, the Red Sox were on the field for the same six hours, xx minutes that the Yankees were Friday night into Saturday morning, but Boston had a major advantage – the uplifting feeling any victory gives a team. When you play a game for that long, you want to end out on top, which the Red Sox did despite allowing the Yankees to tie the score three times.

It was the longest home game (in terms of time) in franchise history and the second-longest overall, behind only their seven-hour, 9-7, 22-inning victory June 24, 1962 at Detroit’s Tiger Stadium. Friday PM/Saturday AM was the Yankees’ longest game (in terms of innings) since a 5-4, 19-inning victory Aug. 25, 1976 over the Twins at Yankee Stadium. It marked the sixth game of at least 19 innings in franchise history. It was the longest game in terms of time for the Red Sox, whose previous longest was six hours, 35 minutes in an 18-inning game Aug. 25, 2001 at Texas. Boston also used 21 players, everyone on the 25-man roster except outfielder Brock Holt and starting pitchers Clay Buchholz, Rick Porcello and Justin Masterson.

The first extra-innings game in the American League this season also was the first extra-innings game between the Yankees and the Red Sox since Sept. 5, 2013, a 9-8, 10-inning Boston victory at the Stadium. It was the longest extra-innings game between the clubs since a 20-inning, 4-3 Yankees victory in the second game of an Aug. 29, 1967 doubleheader at the Stadium.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi used all but four of his players in the game – starting pitchers CC Sabathia, Masahiro Tanaka, Michael Pineda and Adam Warren, the latter of whom was sent home after the ninth inning to be well rested for Saturday’s start. Indeed, Warren pitched fairly well Saturday (one earned run, five hits, two walks, one strikeout in 5 1/3 innings) but had to absorb the loss because of his teammates’ failures with their bats and gloves.

Chase Headley sent the game into extras with a two-out, solo home run in the bottom of the ninth. Mark Teixeira also hit a game-tying home run, in the 16th, by which time the clock had gone past midnight and it was Tex’s 35th birthday. It marked the latest a Yankees player homered in a game since Alfonso Soriano and Jorge Posada both went deep in the top of the 17th inning of a 10-9 victory June 1, 2003 at Detroit’s Comerica Park

Esmil Rogers, the last Yankees pitcher used, went 4 2/3 innings, just one day after working 2 1/3 innings of relief Thursday night against the Blue Jays. Girardi said if the game had done beyond the 19th, Garret Jones would have pitched for the first time since high school. Jones, a first baseman by trade, entered the game as a pinch runner for Alex Rodriguez in the 11th inning and remained in the game as the designated hitter.

Rodriguez was supposed to have Saturday off, but since he did not play the final eight innings of the previous game made his first major-league start at first base and somewhat set the tone of the game by committing an error in the second inning that led to an unearned run off Warren. A-Rod also failed to keep his foot on the bag reaching for an errant throw by Headley for what should have been the third out of the eighth inning when the Red Sox rallied to load the bases and scored three runs on a bases-clearing double by Holt, who had four hits.

The Yankees, who were expected to be stronger defensively this year than last, had three errors in the game and now have eight in the first five games, the most in the league. Catcher John Ryan Murphy had a throwing error and was also charged with a passed ball. Jones in right field with Rodriguez at first base and left fielder Brett Gardner failed to glove catchable balls that fell for run-scoring hits. Shortstop Didi Gregorius inexplicably held the ball instead of relaying home on Holt’s double that might have prevented the third run scored by catcher Ryan Hanigan.

The Yanks did no better at the plate. They had only one hit through the first seven innings off Red Sox starter Joe Kelly, who got himself in trouble only in the second when he threw a wild pitch, walked two batters and allowed a single to Rodriguez, who eventually scored on a sacrifice fly by Gregorius.

Kelly retired the last 17 batters he faced. The streak went to 19 before Gregorio Petit and Gardner singled with two down in the eighth off Alexi Ogando. Both scored on Chris Young’s first home run of the season and the first of six Yankees homers this year that accounted for more than one run.

If only CC could avoid the one bad inning

Thursday night was another one of those “one bad inning” games for CC Sabathia. All eyes were on the lefthander who had a rough time of it in spring training and was passed over for the Opening Day start for the first time since he joined the Yankees in 2009.

His pitching line over 5 2/3 innings in the Yankees’ 6-3 loss to the Blue Jays was both good (no walks, eight strikeouts) and not so good (five runs [four earned], eight hits), but nearly all of the bad stuff happened in one inning, the second, as Toronto scored four runs with five hits, four of those in succession at the start of the inning.

But while Sabathia hit a lot of bats that inning he also missed a good many over the course of his outing as the eight punchouts suggest. The fifth run off CC came in the sixth inning and was not earned due to an error by right fielder Carlos Beltran, whose throw to third base hit the runner, Josh Donaldson, and allowed him to score.

“I thought he pitched pretty well, better than his line indicated,” manager Joe Girard said of Sabathia. “He didn’t give up a lot of hard-hit balls, but they found a lot of holes. He kept the ball in the park and on the ground. If CC is going to be hit like that every time out I’ll take it.”

Sabathia blamed himself for the second-inning problems but was encouraged by his work in the other innings and that he felt fine with no knee issues.

“I felt great and think [the outing] was something to build on — no walks and not a lot of contact,” Sabathia said. “I got away from pounding the ball inside in the second inning. I have to control both sides of the plate.”

The Yankees fought back against lefthander Daniel Norris and cut the deficit to 5-3 in the sixth on solo home runs by Alex Rodriguez and Mark Teixeira. The Yankees’ first run came in the fourth inning when Didi Gregorius singled home John Ryan Murphy, who led off with one of his two doubles. Unfortunately, Gregorius rounded the bag at first base too widely and was tagged out trying to get back, marking the second time in three games he has been thrown out on the bases.

Edwin Encarnacion’s impressive home run off the wall behind the visitors’ bullpen in left field off Esmil Rogers in the eighth was the Blue Jays’ response to the Yankees’ attempted comeback. Toronto was able to win two of three games against the Yankees despite Jose Bautista going hitless in 13 plate appearances with eight strikeouts.

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