Results tagged ‘ Triple A ’

Old-Timers’ party goes on to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre

The Yankees’ Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre affiliate will include a Yankees Legends Game Sunday at PNC Field in Moosic, Pa. After the 69th Annual Old-Timers’ Day takes place Saturday at Yankee Stadium, the Yankees Legends Game Sunday at PNC Field will honor 1978 World Series champion Brian Doyle. A portion of the proceeds from Sunday’s event will benefit the National Parkinson Foundation and the Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Interestingly, the Yankees will honor Willie Randolph with a plaque in Monument Park as part of the Old-Timers’ Day program. Doyle got his time on stage with the Yankees during the 1978 World Series when he played second base for an injured Randolph and batted .438 with a double and two RBI in the Yanks’ six-game triumph over the Dodgers.

The game itself will include Yankees Legends playing against each other. Additionally, the winners of an online auction to benefit Parkinson’s research will also receive the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of participating in the game. The festive atmosphere will be rounded out with a Father’s Day barbeque, live bands and post-game activities, including field access for games of catch, whiffle-ball, and photos in the team dugouts.

“Our top priority, in our first season as an ownership group, was to establish a stronger connection between the New York Yankees and the communities of Northeast Pennsylvania and Western New Jersey,” RailRiders co-managing owner David Abrams said. “This event is our way of thanking our fans by enabling them to see their Yankees heroes and interact with them in an intimate setting, while sharing a special Father’s Day with their families.”

“The idea for the event came after my friend Brian Doyle announced that he had Parkinson’s disease,” RailRiders’ co-owner Grant Cagle said. “Our partnership with the New York Yankees has made this game possible, and we are glad that so many former Yankees are showing their support for Brian by joining us for the day.”

More than 20 Yankees Legends are confirmed for the events, including Bucky Dent, Tommy John, Roy White, Charlie Hayes, Gene Michael, Ron Blomberg, Jesse Barfield, Jeff Nelson, Homer Bush, Graeme Lloyd, Oscar Gamble, Jim Coates and Hector Lopez. Additional Yankees participants will be announced in the coming weeks. For a full list of alumni participants, please visit swbrailriders.com.

Gates will open at 12:30 p.m. in advance of the 2:05 p.m. first pitch. Ticket prices:
Bleachers / Lawn – $10
Field Reserve – $20
Infield Box – $30
Mohegan Sun Club Level – $40
VIP Tickets – $150 (includes game ticket and pre-and post-game lunch and VIP reception with Yankees Legends).

All fans will receive a commemorative game ticket as well. Father’s Day barbeque commences at 3:30 p.m., and costs $25 for adults, $12 for children under 12, and is free for children under 2.
To purchase tickets or for more information, please call (570) 969-BALL (2255), buy online at ticketmaster.com or via the RailRiders website at swbrailriders.com.

Yanks stay tied for 1st despite 2-7 trip

Yankee Stadium will sure look good to the Yankees after this trip. The trek ended with a thud Wednesday night as the Yanks could not add on to a 2-0, first-inning lead and lost, 3-2, to the Nationals on an unearned run in the seventh inning.

The two-game sweep by Washington made it three losing series on the trip for the Yankees, who dropped three of four to Tampa Bay and two of three to Kansas City. The Yankees were 2-7 on the trip and have lost eight of their past 10 games on the road. It did not seem that long ago that the Yankees had an 11-4 road record. It is now 13-12.

Adam Warren gave up solo home runs to Ian Desmond in the first inning and Tyler Moore in the fourth but was hurt by a misplay in the infield in the seventh and compounded it with two walks.

An error by third baseman Chase Headley, his ninth of the year, began the seventh, and the batter who reached, catcher Wilson Ramos, came around to score on a single by Denard Span off lefthander Justin Wilson, who relieved Warren after pinch hitter Dan Uggla walked to load the bases.

Uggla’s at-bat proved as critical as Headley’s boot. Uggla swung at the first pitch and hit a foul pop down the right field line. Carlos Beltran pursued the ball from right field but pulled up as he moved into foul ground and the ball fell free. Given new life, Uggla drew a walk that continued the rally.

After giving up two runs in the first inning, Nationals righthander Jordan Zimmermann allowed no runs and three hits through the seventh. The Yankees did no damage against relievers Matt Grace or Drew Storen (12th save), either. Washington’s bullpen held the Yankees scoreless with three hits in seven innings in the series.

The Nats even spotted the Yanks their best player when Bryce Harper was bounced from the game in the fourth inning by plate umpire Marvin Hudson for beefing about a strike call.

The victory gave the Nats sole possession of first place in the National League East over the Mets, who lost at home to the Cardinals. Despite the tumbling journey in which they lost Jacoby Ellsbury to the 15-day disabled list and Chase Whitley to Tommy John surgery, the Yankees maintained a portion of first place in the American League East with the Rays, who lost at Atlanta and are even with the Yanks at 22-19.

The Yankees have a much-needed open date before resuming play Friday night at the Stadium against the Rangers to start a Memorial Day weekend series. Yankees fans who want to see how Masahiro Tanaka is doing in his injury rehabilitation can do so by viewing his start for Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre against Durham. Coverage on the YES Network begins at 6:30 p.m.

Tanaka to be disabled for at least a month

The Yankees passed out Masahiro Tanaka bobbleheads to customers Tuesday night at Yankee Stadium. That will be the closest to the real thing that Yankees fans will see of the Japanese righthander for at least a month.

Tanaka has a mild strain of the right forearm that will result in his being placed on the 15-day disabled list. Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said that Tanaka would be shut down entirely for seven to 10 days and that the conservative course of action would keep him away from the team for a month.

The pitcher complained of soreness in his right wrist. An MRI revealed tendinitis in the wrist but also the forearm strain. On the positive side was that there was no change in the condition of his right elbow.

Tanaka had been scheduled to start Wednesday’s matinee at the Stadium in the finale of the three-game series against the Rays. Michael Pineda will start on regular rest instead.

Cashman indicated that Chase Whitley, who was called up from Triple A Scranton/Wilkes Barre to start Wednesday night and pitched well (5 IP, 6H, 1R, 1ER, 1BB, 1K, 1WP) would remain in the rotation. Infielder Gregorio Petit, who had been optioned to SWP to make roster space for Whitley, is likely to return.

Just when the Yankees were making some strides, they suffer this blow. Tanaka was 2-1 with a 3.22 ERA and 24 strikeouts in four starts totaling 22 1/3 innings.

Pineda back in rotation Wednesday night

The Yankees made no secret of the value they place on the three-game series against the American League East-leading Orioles that begins Monday night at Camden Yards. Instead of making one more injury-rehabilitation start for Triple-A Scranton, Michael Pineda will return to the Yankees’ rotation Wednesday night for the finale of the Baltimore set.

It will mark Pineda’s first major-league appearance since April 23 at Boston. The righthander has been on the disabled list since May 6 because of a right shoulder muscle injury and was unavailable for 86 games. He made his second minor league rehab appearance Aug. 8 for Scranton against Columbus and allowed one earned run, six hits and no walks with seven strikeouts in 4 1/3 innings. Before that, Pineda pitched 3 1/3 scoreless innings with three hits, a walk and four strikeouts Aug. 3 for Scranton against Syracuse.

Esmail Rogers, who earned his first victory for the Yankees with five strong innings last Friday night at Yankee Stadium against the Indians, had been slated to start Wednesday night. The move to Pineda gives the Yankees another good arm in the bullpen for the Orioles series.

The Yankees avoided a second consecutive shutout Sunday, thanks to Jacoby Ellsbury’s two-out home run in the bottom of the ninth inning. The Yanks were last shut out in consecutive games May 12 (1-0) and 13 (2-0) in 1999 against the Angels and have played 2,512 games since. That marks the longest streak of not being shut out in consecutive games in Major League Baseball history, according to research by the Elias Sports Bureau. Elias also notes that the second-longest such streak in MLB history belongs to the Cardinals, who had 2,367 games between being blanked in back-to-back games Sept. 24-25, 1995 and July 22-23, 2010.

Derek Jeter was in Monday night’s lineup, which would be his 2,707th career game. That ties him with the Royals’ George Brett for ninth place on the all-time list of games by players with only one team. No. 8 on the list is the Giants’ Mel Ott at 2,730.

Yankees acquire Headley from Padres

As to the question that has been floating around as the July 31 trade deadline nears of whether the Yankees will be buyers or sellers, it was answered by general manager Brian Cashman Tuesday with the acquisition of third baseman Chase Headley from the Padres for infielder Yangervis Solarte, Class A Tampa pitcher Rafael De Paula and cash.

Let’s not carried away. Headley is no savior. Two years ago, the switch hitter, 30, finished fifth in the voting for the National League Most Valuable Player Award after leading the league in RBI with 115 and batting .286 with 31 home runs. He slipped to .250 with 13 home runs and 50 RBI a year ago, and this season has been plagued by back problems while hitting .229 with seven homers and 32 RBI.

Headley can be a free agent at season’s end, so he is in essence a rental player and one who has plenty of incentive to have a big finish and put up the kind of offensive numbers that will make him attractive in the open market over the winter and perhaps give the Yankees a lift in their pursuit of a postseason berth, preferably as the American League East division winner.

The Yankees’ signing of Solarte to a minor-league deal figured into this trade. They took a flier on an eight-year minor leaguer, who worked hard to make the team as a utility player and had a delirious six-week run early on that made him a feel-good story at the time and a valuable bargaining chip in trade negotiations.

Solarte, 27, batted .254 with 26 runs, 14 doubles, six home runs and 31 RBI in 75 games and 252 at-bats with the Yankees. He also played in five games with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre and hit .600 with three doubles, one triple and five RBI in 20 at-bats.

De Paula, 23, was 6-5 with a 4.15 ERA in 20 games (17 starts) covering 89 innings for Tampa. He was originally signed by the Yankees as a minor-league free agent Nov. 18, 2010.

Headley was en route to New York from Chicago but was not expected at Yankee Stadium by game time. Kelly Johnson, who has shared third base with Solarte and Zelous Wheeler this year, found himself in right field for the first time as a major leaguer. With Mark Teixeira unavailable because of a left lat strain, Brian McCann started at first base with Francisco Cervelli behind the plate.

Tough night for Gr-EEE-ne

Watching Shane Greene on the mound Monday night made one wonder how much PFP is done in the minor leagues. PFP stands for pitchers’ fielding practice, an exercise dreaded by hurlers, especially during the heat of spring training.

It is pretty boring stuff, too, but there are times when pitchers are reminded why fielding their position is important. Greene, who has done a terrific job since his recall from Triple A Scranton, had a rough time of it in the third and fourth innings and was charged with three errors. That’s three Es for a guy with three of them in his last name.

Two of the misplays came in the second inning, but he escaped without damage. Greene dropped a feed from first baseman Kelly Johnson that allowed Leonys Martin to reach first base. With two out, Greene fielding a pepper shot by Jim Adduci , but his under-handed toss sailed over Johnson’s head. That put runners on second and third, but Greene redeemed himself by striking out Geovanny Soto.

An error cost the Yankees a run in the third, but this one was by Brian Roberts. With runners on first and third with one out, the second baseman dropped shortstop Derek Jeter’s throw that might have started a double play but instead allowed the runner from third to score. Again, Greene got a strikeout to minimize the damage and end the inning.

With two out in the fourth, Greene was at it again throwing to first base as if 6-foot-8 Dellin Betances was the fielder there. Greene fielded a dribbler by Soto and threw another sailer well out of Johnson’s reach. When Rougned Odor hit a tapper to the mound, the crowd roared its approval when Greene ran toward first base and made an accurate toss to Johnson for the final out.

It took five innings for the Yankees’ hits to catch up with their errors. Jacoby Ellsbury’s eighth home run of the season, a solo shot leading off the fourth against Texas starter Miles Mikolas, was only the Yankees’ second hit. They got to four to match their errors with singles by Francisco Cervelli and Zelous Wheeler. A walk to Brett Gardner loaded the bases, but Jeter grounded into a double play.

If many of those Rangers names seem strange, well, that is because so many of their regulars are injured. Texas has already had 51 different players, including 30 pitchers, on its roster this year. Both figures are records for prior to the All-Star break. The Rangers have sunk to the bottom of the American League West by losing 24 of their previous 28 games.

Solarte kept playing hard, earned recall

One of the dangers of a player being sent down to the minor leagues during a season is that he may pout and fall into a funk after he leaves the major league club. A manager always tells a player not to let that happen and that whatever he does down in the minors is watched closely so that he always has the chance of coming back.

Yangvervis Solarte obviously took that message from Yankees manager Joe Girardi to heart last week when he was farmed out to Triple A Scranton. Solarte is no stranger to the minor leagues, of course. He spent eight years there before making it with the Yankees out of spring training camp back in April.

In five games at Scranton, Solarte batted .600 with three doubles, a triple and five RBI in 20 at-bats. That’s right; he went 12-for-20 and had a 1.469 OPS in his brief time with the RailRiders. That earned him a recall Thursday and a return to the lineup at third base for the series finale at Cleveland.

Solarte was added to the roster because outfielder-designated hitter Carlos Beltran was placed on the seven-day concussion list after he suffered a broken nose during batting practice before Wednesday night’s game when a batted ball ricocheted off the side of the cage and struck him in the face.

“You don’t expect that to happen when you’re practicing,” Beltran said on. “I had a headache for the whole day. Now it’s getting better. Hopefully tomorrow it will get better and I could be back soon.”

Girardi said Beltran will not return until the Friday after the All-Star break, July 18, when the Yankees open an inter-league, weekend series against the Reds.

There was no update on the condition of pitcher Masahiro Tanaka, who is on the 15-day disabled list because of right elbow inflammation. Tanaka underwent an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and traveled to Seattle where Dr. Chris Ahmad, the Yankees’ team physician, is attending an orthopedist convention.

Yanks keep Mets silent in their house

What a difference a venue makes. Well, that and pitching. The Yankees and the Mets combined to score 35 runs in the first two games of the Subway Series at Yankee Stadium but totaled only five runs in the next two games at Citi Field. After watching the Mets score 21 runs in the Bronx, the Yankees held them scoreless over the full 18 innings in Queens.

The Yanks won both games started by a pair of rookies, although Wednesday night’s winner, Masahiro Tanaka, is a first-year player only in terms of the major leagues. He pitched a gem for his first big-league complete game shutout to stop the Yankees’ four-game losing streak and six-game slide to the Mets over two seasons. That was followed by the major-league debut of Triple A call-up Chase Whitley, who also pitched scoreless ball for 4 2/3 innings and picked up his first major-league hit as well. He did not figure in the decision on his personal record but was a major part of the 1-0 victory.

The winning decision went to Dellin Betances, who put on one helluva show. After getting the final out of the fifth inning to bail out Whitley, Betances faced six more batters over the next two innings and struck out all of them. David Robertson was called on later to get a four-out save. He did not disappoint in retiring the four batters he faced, two on strikeouts.

The Mets also had a starting pitcher make his big-league debut in righthander Jacob deGrom, who earned a spot in the rotation with seven innings of one-run, four-hit, two-walk, six-strikeout pitching. He, too, also got his first hit and the first by any Mets pitcher this year in 65 at-bats. The only run might have been avoided except for a curse that comes with the in-vogue strategy of today’s game, the infield over-shift.

Brian McCann appeared to have grounded into a double play in the seventh inning when he hit a grounder to the right side with one out and one on. With the Mets over-shifting, third baseman David Wright had to make the pivot to first base from second. Not used to making that throw, Wright made a side-armed toss to first that had little muscle and went into the dirt as well. First baseman Lucas Duda could not make the scoop, and McCann was safe at first base. In defense of Duda and Wright, they teamed on a tremendous double play that ended Monday night’s game at the Stadium. They did not strike lightning twice.

That kept the inning alive for Alfonso Soriano, who got the hardest hit ball off deGrom, a double to left-center that sent the heavy-legged McCann huffing and puffing around the bases for a run that proved very precious.

Dueling major-league debuts in Subway Series

Thursday night’s finale of the 2014 Subway Series at Citi Field featured the unusual pairing of pitchers making their major-league debuts against each other, the Yankees’ Chase Whitley, who was called up from Triple A Scranton, and the Mets’ Jacob deGrom, a Triple A Las Vegas call-up.

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, the previous time that both pitchers made their big-league debuts was Sept. 7, 2010 when the Mets’ Dillon Gee opposed the Nationals’ Yunesky Maya at Washington. deGrom followed the major-league debut of teammate Rafael Montero, Thursday night’s losing pitcher. The previous major-league team that had starting pitchers make their debuts in consecutive games was the Brewers in 2002 (Ben Diggins Sept. 2 in the second game of a doubleheader and Dave Pember Sept. 3). The last time it happened before rosters expand in September was in 2001 by the Cubs’ Carlos Zambrano Aug. 20 in the second game of a twin bill and Juan Cruz Aug. 21.

The last time the Yankees were involved in a game in which both starters made their big league debuts was all the way back to Oct. 6, 1908 at Boston when the Highlanders’ Andy O’Connor was paired with the Red Sox’s Doc McMahon at the Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds.

Elias also uncovered some gems concerning Masahiro Tanaka’s first complete-game shutout Thursday night, a 4-0 four-hitter. The Japanese righthander joined Andy Pettitte as the second Yankees starter with a complete-game shutout over the Mets, joining Andy Pettitte in an 8-0 victory June 30, 2002. Tanaka has a 6-0 record and 66 strikeouts in his first eight career games with the Yankees. No other pitcher to debut since 1900 has had at least 60 strikeouts while earning at least six victories in his first eight appearances in the majors.

Tanaka is also the first pitcher since 1900 to strike out at least 60 hitters while allowing fewer than 10 walks in his first eight career games. He is the second Yankees pitcher to be undefeated with at least six victories through eight games in the majors. The other was Vic Raschi, who started 7-0 for the Yanks over the 1946 and ’47 seasons. The only other active pitcher who was 6-0 or better through his first eight career games is the Angels’ Jered Weaver (7-0 in 2006). Tanaka is also the first pitcher to win his first six decisions as a starter with the Yankees since Aaron Small went 8-0 in his first nine starts with the club in 2005. Small played for five teams before joining the Yankees.

Both clubs placed key players on the disabled list before the game. The Yankees disabled right fielder Carlos Beltran, who has bone spurs in his right elbow. Mets catcher Travis d’Arnau, who was struck in the helmet by Alfonso Soriano’s backswing earlier in the week, was placed on the 7-day concussion DL.

Thursday also marked the 100th anniversary of the birth of former Yankees publicist Bob Fishel, who led the department from 1954-73, a tenure that spanned three different ownership groups (Dan Topping/Del Webb, CBS and George M. Steinbrenner). He worked with managers Casey Stengel, Ralph Houk, Yogi Berra and Johnny Keane. Fishel left the Yankees after the 1973 season to become the PR director of the American League. The annual award presented by Major League Baseball to the PR director of the year is named in Bob’s honor.

Yankees promote five players as rosters expand

There were some new faces in the Yankees clubhouse Sunday plus some familiar faces that had been in the minors recently. On the day active rosters are allowed to expand from 25 to up to 40 players, the Yankees recalled pitchers Dellin Betances and Brett Marshall and infielder David Adams from Triple A Scranton.

Also brought up were pitcher Cesar Cabral, whose contract was purchased from Scranton, and catcher J.R. Murphy, who signed a major league contract and was selected off the Scranton roster. To create roster space for Cabral and Murphy, the Yankees transferred infielder Jayson Nix (fractured left hand) to the 60-day disabled list and released outfielder Melky Mesa. Pitcher Preston Claiborne is expected to join the team Monday when the Yankees open a three-game series against the White Sox.

About the added personnel, Yankees manager Joe Girardi said, “Just contribute any way they can is the bottom line. It can be one hitter, it can be one at-bat; could play one inning. Any way you could help us out is all we’re asking you to do.”

That said, Girardi reiterated his dislike of the expanded-roster period and belief that each game managers should have to designate which 25 players are eligible to play that day. It is an idea worth pursuing by Major League Baseball which to this point it has not.

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