Results tagged ‘ World Series ’

Yanks take 12-1 lead, then have to sweat it out

The Yankees ended the trip in Boston the way it began in Atlanta with a blowout victory, although matters got a bit dicey in the late innings, which is typical of life at Fenway Park.

Scoring runs was what this trek was all about for the Yankees, which they sorely needed following their prior disappointing homestand. Perhaps the upcoming, 10-game homestand against the Rays, Orioles and Blue Jays that begins Friday night will be more successful for the Bombers now that they have loosened up offensively.

A 13-8 victory over the Red Sox in a late-afternoon start made it a 5-1 trip for the Yankees, who outscored opponents by a combined score of 57-24.

It did not take long for David Ortiz to break out of his funk. The day after he took a golden sombrero with four strikeouts Tuesday night, Big Papi broke the spell in the first inning with a double to right field that scored Mookie Betts, who led off with a double off the Green Monster but was still stuck on second base with two out.

Boston’s glee was short-lived, however. The Yankees responded in the second inning with an eight-run outburst that began with a two-run home run by Greg Bird. Yes, that was Bird at first base for the Yankees as manager Joe Girardi came to his senses and kept Alex Rodriguez as the designated hitter instead of using him at first base against a left-handed starting pitcher, in this case rookie Henry Owens.

With the injury to first baseman Mark Teixeira that has sidelined him for two weeks and likely will keep him out another fortnight, Girardi had been contemplating playing Rodriguez a first base on occasion even though he displayed no proclivity at the position when used there earlier this season. The feeling here is that A-Rod should not wander off the DH position at this time of year after spending all season in that role. Moving to a position in the field for a 40-year-old who has hardly used a glove all season did not seem to make much sense.

So Rodriguez stayed at DH with Bird at first base, and did that not work out for the Yankees as they chased Owen in that second inning? Bird’s homer following a one-out walk to Chase Headley was the rookie’s fourth hit in 10 at-bats against lefthanders, so it could mean that platooning him may not be necessary.

And A-Rod struck the blow that knocked out Owen, a two-run single, then trotted home after Carlos Beltran slugged the first pitch from reliever Ryan Cook over the Monster for the Yanks’ third home run of the inning. John Ryan Murphy had followed Bird’s blow with one of his own.

The inning also included yet more hits from red-hot Didi Gregorius (single) and Stephen Drew (double), both left-handed hitters, and another run-scoring hit off a lefty by Chris Young. Drew kept it up with a three-run home run an inning later as did Gregorius with a solo shot in the fifth.

Boston fans who remember his importance as the shortstop on the Red Sox’ 2013 World Series champions may wonder why Yankees fans have been so rough on Drew. Actually, Yanks fans have been awfully patient with Drew, whose batting average was below .200 most of the past two seasons.

After starting the trip 0-for-4 with his average falling to .192, Drew vaulted over the Mendoza the past four games with nine hits in 12 at-bats (.750) with two doubles, two home runs and nine RBI and is now hitting a robust .211.

Gregorius, another Yankees infielder who took a while to win over the fans, also had a huge trip with 14 hits in 24 at-bats (.583), one double, two home runs and 10 RBI. The shortstop walked three times and scored seven runs and lifted his batting average from .253 to .272.

An emotional spot for the Yanks was the appearance of Andrew Bailey in relief of winning pitcher Mashiro Tanaka (11-6) in the seventh inning. Bailey, the 2009 American League winner of the Jackie Robinson Rookie of the Year Award with the Athletics, last pitched in the majors two years ago for the Red Sox and came back from two shoulder injuries. The righthander showed some rust in giving up two walks and a single, but just getting back on a big-league hill was a major hurdle for the New Jersey native who now lives in Connecticut.

However, the lack of shutdown work by Bailey and Bryan Mitchell, who gave up two runs in the eighth, forced Girardi to use Dellin Betances in what was once a 12-1 game to get out of a bases-loaded situation with a strikeout of Pablo Sandoval and a force play by Zander Bogaerts.

Caleb Cotham did not make Girardi’s job easier as the skipper was forced to bring in Andew Miller in a non-closing situation after the first two Boston batters in the ninth reached base on doubles. Miller finally put an end to the trip that kept the Yanks within reach of Toronto in the American League East and bolstered their hold on a wild-card berth.

Yankees ‘Marching Through Georgia,’ baseball-style

Who would have thought Joe Torre was such a prophet back in 1996? The Yankees lost the first two games of the World Series to the Braves at Yankee Stadium, but the ever-cool Torre promised Yankees principal owner George Steinbrenner he would bring the Series back to the Bronx by winning the three games at Atlanta.

“That is my town,” said Torre, who both played and managed for the Braves and lived in Atlanta for more than a decade. “We’ll win the games there and wrap up the Series in Game 6 here.”

Lord knows what Steinbrenner made of such a boast other than to respond, “You better!”

Thanks to the pitching of David Cone and Andy Pettitte, the hitting of Bernie Williams and Jim Leyritz and the fielding of sore-legged Paul O’Neill, the Yanks did precisely that by sweeping the Bravos in their own yard and capping off the Series with a victory at home over Hall of Fame-bound Greg Maddux in Game 6.

And the Yankees have not stopped winning in Atlanta ever since, including this weekend by completing a three-game sweep with a 20-6 battering of the Braves.

Chase Headley and Stephen Drew each homered and drove in four runs. Drew reached base in all six of his plate appearances with three singles and two walks to go with his 16th dinger that got his season batting average over .200 (.201).

Jacoby Ellsbury started the parade against Braves starter Julio Teheran with a three-run home run in the second inning after two were out. The Yankees made it 7-0 in the third with four more two-out runs on two-run home runs by Headley and Drew.

Nathan Eovaldi, who has benefit from abundant run support all season, was fine through five innings but gave up three straight hits at the start of the sixth. All three runners eventually scored as the Braves cut the deficit to 8-5.

The Yankees pulled away with a vengeance in a 27-minute top of the seventh as they sent 14 batters to the plate and scored nine runs. A bases-loaded single by Alex Rodriguez pinch hitting got the first two runs in, and the line just kept moving on RBI hits by Brett Gardner, Brian McCann, Greg Bird, Headley and Drew.

Three more runners crossed the plate in the eighth, one on a double by Branden Pinder, the first extra-base hit by a Yankees pitcher in six years. The Yankees finished with 21 hits with each spot in the batting order getting at least one hit and one run. At the top of the order Ellsbury and Gardner batted seven times apiece in a nine-inning game.

All those runs helped push Eovaldi’s record to 14-2, the best winning percentage (.875) for a starting pitcher this season. The righthander extended his unbeaten streak to 13 starts over which he is 9-0 with a 3.32 ERA in 78 2/3 innings.

McCann had a splendid homecoming to his former stomping grounds in batting .300 with one double, one home run and six RBI in 10 at-bats in the series. He walked five times and scored five runs. Didi Gregorius also had a big series by going 7-for-12 (.533) with a double, a homer and seven RBI.

So after dropping two of three games to Houston at Yankee Stadium in which they batted .165 with two extra-base hits and four runs (1.3 per game), the Yankees bashed away at a .365 clip with 19 extra-base hits and 38 runs (12.7 per game) against the Braves.

That is what playing in Atlanta can do for them.

The Yankees’ .857 all-time winning percentage at Turner Field based on a 12-2 record is their highest at any ballpark in club history (minimum two games played). They have an eight-game winning streak dating back to June 24, 2009 at the Ted, which is in its 19th and final season as the home of the Braves, who will move to the suburbs next year. The only longer winning streak by an opponent is a nine-gamer by the Phillies from June 6 to Sept. 18, 2008.

The Yankees have won all five road series at Turner Field (3-0 this year, 3-0 in 2012, 2-1 in 2009, 2-1 in 2000 and 2-0 in 1998). They scored at least six runs in nine of their 14 games at the Ted.

Including postseason play, the Yankees’ all-time record in Atlanta is 17-2 (.895), featuring a perfect 5-0 in World Series play. In addition to those victories Torre promised the Boss in 1996 in the last three games played at old Fulton County Stadium, the Yanks won both World Series games at Turner Field in their four-game sweep in 1999.

After what the Yankees saw of Braves pitching over the weekend, they can be sure there will be no World Series in Atlanta this year.

Posada joins legends in Monument Park

During Saturday’s ceremony at Yankee Stadium for former All-Star catcher Jorge Posada, whose uniform No. 20 was retired and who received a plaque in Monument Park, I got a text from my son Corey, who was watching on television from his home on Long Island.

“Watching this makes me feel very old!”

Corey is only 33. If he thought he felt old, how about me? I met Posada at his first spring training camp with the Yankees 20 years ago. There is a photo in the office of my Queens apartment of me presenting the James P. Dawson Award to Posada as the outstanding rookie in training camp for 1997 before a spring training game at Tampa, the year before there was a major league franchise in that area.

And now there was Posada, still trim but his wavy black hair turning grey, standing behind a podium surrounded by former teammates, Yankees dignitaries and his family drinking in praise from a sellout crowd in the Bronx talking about a career that does not seem all that long ago.

One of the feelings that these celebrations at the Stadium convey is the passage of time. Posada was an integral part of a period in Yankees history that was indeed glorious and to people of Corey’s generation a dominant part of their personal scrapbook, the way previous generations venerated the careers of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford, Mickey Mantle, Bobby Murcer, Thurman Munson, Ron Guidry and Don Mattingly.

“I can’t believe I’m standing up here right now,” Posada told the crowd. “And I can tell you, I’ve never been nervous on a baseball field. Being here seems surreal. I can honestly tell you, this is one of the happiest days of my life.”

His partners in the Core Four — Derek Jeter, Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte, who will be honored Sunday — were in attendance as well as former teammates Bernie Williams, David Cone, Hideki Matsui and Paul O’Neill; former manager Joe Torre; former trainer Gene Monahan; former player, coach, manager and executive Gene Michael and general partner Jennifer Steinbrenner Swindal.

Andy Pettitte, Mariano Rivera, Jorge Posada, Derek Jeter, Bernie Williams (NY Daily News photo).

Andy Pettitte, Mariano Rivera, Jorge Posada, Derek Jeter, Bernie Williams (NY Daily News photo).

Posada was truly moved at being considered part of the legacy of great Yankees catchers that began with Bill Dickey and continued through Berra, Elston Howard and Munson, whose widow, Diane, was also on the field. Posada kept a baseball card of Munson in his locker throughout his playing career.

“I never saw myself as part of that group,” Posada said. “Just a lot of respect for the guys. It’s just being there with them now is such a great honor. I’m never going to forget this day.”

Berra, hobbled by painful knees, was unable to attend but sent Posada a personal message that was displayed and narrated on the video board in center field.

“You were a really good ball player for a long time,” Berra wrote. “I’m proud of you, kid.”

Posada could not help but appreciate the irony that he had resisted at first the Yankees’ suggestion that he convert to catcher from second base, his natural position, while in the minor leagues in 1991. He recalled a conversation he had with Mark Newman, then the Yankees’ director of player personnel.

“He said, you have a great arm. You’re going to be very strong because your legs are very strong. You haven’t been catching, so you’re going to be very durable. Your knees are not [worn out]. They haven’t caught.’ And he said, ‘It’s the fastest way to get to the big leagues.’ When he said that, that was it. That was it for me. I wanted to get to the big leagues. That’s all I wanted.”

Posada went on to play 17 seasons behind the plate, all for the Yankees, and batted .273 with 275 home runs and 1,065 RBI. He was a five-time All-Star, won five Silver Slugger Awards and wore four World Series rings. Only twice did the Yankees fail to reach postseason play in Posada’s time. He played in 125 postseason games, including 29 in the World Series.

Posada evoked DiMaggio when he said, “Today, I must say I want to thank the Good Lord for making me a Yankee.”

He was all Georgie when he said, “Ever since I can remember, all I wanted to ever do was play baseball. Honestly, I didn’t have a Plan B.”

That was a break for all of us, no matter how old it made us feel Saturday.

Jorge Posada’s Plaque

1995 – 2011





AUGUST 22, 2015

Posada, Pettitte to be honored during homestand

The Yankees were back at Yankee Stadium Monday night for the start of a long homestand. The 10-game stretch will feature a three-game series against the Twins (Monday and Tuesday nights and Wednesday afternoon, a four-game set against the Indians Thursday and Friday nights and Saturday and Sunday afternoons and a three-game series against the Astros next Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights.

As part of separate pregame ceremonies prior to the scheduled 1:05 p.m. games against the Indians on Saturday and Sunday, respectively, the Yankees will honor Jorge Posada and Andy Pettitte by unveiling Monument Park plaques recognizing their careers. Additionally, Posada’s uniform No. 20 and Pettitte’s uniform No. 46 will be retired by the organization. Former teammates, coaches and other guests will take part in the festivities. Gates will open two hours prior to first pitch at 11 a.m. on both days, and fans are encouraged to arrive early and be in their seats by 12 noon.

Posada spent each of his 17 major league seasons with the Yankees from 1995-2011. He batted .273 with 900 runs, 379 doubles, 275 home runs and 1,065 RBI in 1,829 games and 6,092 at-bats. As a player on five World Series championship teams (1996, ‘98, ‘99, 2000, ‘09), Posada finished his career among baseball’s all-time postseason leaders in games (second, 125), doubles (third, 23) and hits (fourth, 103). His 119 postseason contests as a catcher are the most all time. A five-time American League All-Star and Silver Slugger Award winner (each in 2000-03, ’07), Posada twice finished in the top 10 in AL Most Valuable Player balloting — third in 2003 and sixth in 2007.

Pettitte pitched in 15 seasons with the club (1995-2003, ’07-10 and ’12-13). He had a 219-127 record with a 3.94 ERA and 2,020 strikeouts in 447 games (438 starts) and 2,796 1/3 innings. The lefthander is the franchise leader in strikeouts, is tied with Whitey Ford for most starts and trails only Ford (236 victories, 3,171 innings) and Red Ruffing (231 victories, 3,168 innings) in winning decisions and innings pitched for the Yankees. The three-time AL All-Star (1996, 2001 and ’10) is the only pitcher drafted by the Yankees to win 200 games in the majors. As a Yankees pitcher, Pettitte was 18-10 with a 3.76 ERA (251.1IP, 105ER) in 40 career postseason starts and 251 1/3 innings and is the organization’s all-time playoff leader in victories, starts, innings pitched and strikeouts (167).

The seventh annual HOPE Week (Helping Others Persevere & Excel) will run from Monday through Friday. The initiative is a unique week-long community program that brings to light five remarkable stories intended to inspire individuals into action in their own communities. Since its inception in 2009, the Yankees have recognized more than 30 different 501(c)3 organizations as part of HOPE Week.

Each day over the five-day stretch, the Yankees will reach out to an individual, family or organization worthy of recognition and support, surprising honorees with a day celebrating their accomplishments. Outreach will often take place away from the Stadium, which will allow the Yankees to connect personally with individuals in settings that highlight their greatest successes.

Ticket specials will run on Monday, Aug. 17 (Military Personnel Game); Tuesday, Aug. 18 (Military Personnel Game); Wednesday, Aug. 19 (MasterCard Half-Price/Senior Citizen/Student/Youth/Military Personnel Game); Thursday, Aug. 20 (Military Personnel Game); Monday, Aug. 24 (Military Personnel Game); Tuesday, Aug. 25 (Military Personnel Game), and Wednesday, Aug. 26 (MasterCard Half-Price/Senior Citizen/Student/Youth/Military Personnel Game).

For a complete list of ticket specials, including game dates, seating locations, and terms and conditions, fans should visit Please note that all ticket specials are subject to availability.

The homestand will also feature the following promotional items and dates:

Monday, August 17 – Yankees vs. Twins, 7:05 p.m.
* Frank Sinatra Music Download Card Night, presented by Universal Music, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Wednesday, August 19 – Yankees vs. Twins, 1:05 p.m.
* Yankees Coloring Book Day, presented by Party City, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 14 and younger.

Thursday, August 20 – Yankees vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Microfiber Cloth Night, presented by The Parking Spot, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Friday, August 21 – Yankees vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Water Bottle Night, presented by Budweiser, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Saturday, August 22 – Yankees vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m.
* Jorge Posada Collector Card Day, presented by Yankees-Steiner Collectibles, to all in attendance.

Sunday, August 23 – Yankees vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m.
* Andy Pettitte Collector Card Day, presented by Yankees-Steiner Collectibles, to all in attendance.

Monday, August 24 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
* Jacoby Ellsbury Bobblehead Night, presented by AT&T, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Tuesday, August 25 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Cap Night, presented by Cooper Tire, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Wednesday, August 26 – Yankees vs. Astros, 1:05 p.m.
* Mark Teixeira Poster Day, presented by Catch 24 Advertising, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 14 and younger.

Tickets may be purchased online at,, at the Yankee Stadium Ticket Office, via Ticketmaster phone at (877) 469-9849, Ticketmaster TTY at (800) 943-4327 and at all Ticket Offices located within Yankees Clubhouse Shops. Tickets may also be purchased on Yankees Ticket Exchange at, the only official online resale marketplace for Yankees fans to purchase and resell tickets to Yankees games. Fans with questions may call (212) YANKEES [926-5337] or email

For information on parking and public transportation options to Yankee Stadium, please visit and click on the Yankee Stadium tab at the top of the page.

Beltran thrives in playoff atmosphere

No matter what happens Sunday, the Yankees are guaranteed to depart Toronto in first place in the American League East. They assured themselves of that by following Friday night’s exhilarating come-from-behind victory with a thoroughly commanding triumph Saturday that let the Blue Jays know they are in for a fight.

Masahiro Tanaka, in what was probably the most important start of his brief career in North America, gave the Yankees precisely what they needed Saturday with a route-going performance, his first complete game of the season and fourth of his career. The Yankees beat Toronto at its own game with home runs by Carlos Beltran (No. 12) and Mark Teixeira (No. 31) doing in Marco Estrada, who had shut them out for 6 1/3 innings last Sunday at Yankee Stadium.

This series has been a turnaround set for the Yankees, who have out-homered the Jays, 3-0, and beat two of the pitchers who shut them down last weekend.

Another sellout crowd at Rogers Centre of 46,630 had little to cheer about as the Yankees increased their lead in the division to 1 1/2 games (three in the loss column). The large crowds have conveyed a playoff atmosphere, which may be why Beltran has played so huge a role in the first two games.

After all, Beltran is among the greatest postseason players in major league history. In 51 postseason games and 180 at-bats, Beltran has batted .333 with 45 runs, 13 doubles, one triple, 16 home runs, 40 runs batted and 11 stolen bases. His OPS (on-base average plus slugging percentage) in postseason play is an incredible 1.128.

It began back in 2004 when a late-season trade sent him from Kansas City to Houston where he hit eight home runs in 12 games combined in the National Leage Division Series and NL Championship Series.

Mets fans glumly recall that Beltran took a 3-2 breaking ball from then rookie Adam Wainwright for the final out of the 2006 NLCS against the Cardinals, who went on to win their first World Series in 24 years in a five-game victory over the Tigers. What Mets fans tend to forget is that Beltran batted .296 with three homers and four RBI against St. Louis.

Playing for the Cardinals in 29 postseason games over the 2012 and ’13 seasons, Beltran hit .306 with nine doubles, one triple, five home runs and 21 RBI. He finally got to the World Series in 2013 and hit .294 with three RBI, but the Cards lost in six games to the Red Sox.

If the Yankees can get to postseason play this year, they can thank Beltran for what he has done the past two games. His three-run, pinch-hit home run in the eighth inning Friday night off Aaron Sanchez was a game-winner, and Beltran got the Yankees off on a positive note Saturday with a first-inning solo homer off Estrada.

Beltran’s homer Friday night was the Yankees’ first go-ahead, pinch-hit homer when trailing in the eighth inning or later since Jorge Posada hit a pinch-hit three-run homer in the bottom of the eighth Sept. 9, 2009 against the Rays at Yankee Stadium. The previous Yankees player to hit a go-ahead pinch-hit homer on the road in the eighth inning or later was Don Mattingly July 24, 1994 at Anaheim, a three-run shot that erased a 4-2 deficit.

Beltran, who also doubled Saturday, extended his hitting streak to 10 games during which he has batted .375 in 32 at-bats. During Beltran’s 16-game on-base streak (since July 26), he is batting .346 with 10 runs, six doubles, five home runs, nine RBI and eight walks in 60 plate appearances.

It was still a 1-0 game in the fifth when it appeared the game was getting out of hand for Tanaka. He loaded the bases on two walks sandwiched around an opposite-field single by 9-hole hitter Ben Revere with the power portion of the Jays’ batting order coming up.

The crowd got excited when Josh Donaldson lifted a high fly to left field but had to settle for a game-tying sacrifice fly. Tanaka bore down to strike out Jose Bautista on a nasty splitter and retire the equally dangerous Edwin Encarnacion on a soft infield fly.

Tanaka’s effort was rewarded the next inning when Teixeira, getting a day off the field as the designated hitter, lauched a home run to right field. Rookie Greg Bird played first base and got his first major-league hit, a single to left in the eighth, after Teixeira got his second RBI on a single that scored Chris Young, pinch running for Beltran, who had doubled with one out. John Ryan Murphy doubled and scored on a single by Jacoby Ellsbury in the ninth.

Tanaka was masterful the rest of the way as he set down 15 of Toronto’s last 16 batters to give a weary bullpen a needed blow.

Betances does his part in AL All-Star victory

CINCINNATI — American League manager Ned Yost of the Royals came through for Dellin Betances. Aware that Betances never got out of the AL bullpen at last year’s All-Star Game at Minneapolis, Yost told the righthander the seventh inning would be all his Tuesday night at Great American Ball Park.

Betances did his part in the AL’s 6-3 victory that guaranteed home field advantage in the World Series to the league, although that did not help Yost last year as his Royals lost Game 7 at home to the Giants. Blame that on Madison Bumgarner.

The Yankees’ set-up reliever got through the seventh unscathed, much like he has during the regular season. Working with a 5-2 lead thanks to a two-run rally in the top of the inning that was fueled in part by teammate Mark Teixeira, Betances retired Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on a ground ball to second base. After walking Cubs rookie outfielder Kris Bryant, Betances came back to strike out Giants second baseman Joe Panick, the former St. John’s University standout, and set down Diamondbacks outfielder A.J. Pollock on a grounder to third.

In the top of the seventh, Teixeira grounded out to the left side that pushed the Orioles’ Manny Machado to third base from where he scored on a fly ball by the Rangers’ Prince Fielder. Teixeira had a rougher time in the ninth inning as he made the final out of the game striking out on a 103-mph fastball by the Reds’ Aroldis Chapman.

Brett Gardner, the Yankees’ other representative in the game, also had a tough night. He was called out on strikes in both of his at-bats, in the fifth inning against the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw and in the eighth against former Yankees teammate Mark Melancon, now the closer for the Pirates.

It was also announced during the All-Star festivities the Franchise Four for each of the 30 clubs in a vote of fans. The Baseball Writers’ Association of America took part in setting up the ballot of eight players from each franchise (full disclosure: I was the BBWAA voter assigned to the Yankees).

It should come as no surprise that the Yanks’ Franchise Four were the team’s Mount Rushmore: Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle. It is pretty hard to break through that quartet. Younger fans may wonder about Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera considering all the club records they have, but the other four men helped shape the franchise and are among the most decorated players in baseball history.

For the record, the eight players on the Yankees’ ballot in addition to the four were Jeter, Rivera, Yogi Berra and Whitey Ford. Believe me, it was hard to leave players like Bill Dickey and Don Mattingly off that list. This was one of those promotions where the Yankees were hurt because of the richness of their history.

There was a nice moment before the game where the four men voted the game’s greatest living players came onto the field — Hank Aaron, Johnny Bench, Sandy Koufax and Willie Mays. I had three of those players on my ballot but chose Yogi over Koufax in a close call. Some might say that Berra belonged there more than Bench, but even Yogi told me once that he thinks JB was the best catcher who ever lived.

An appropriate “-30-” for 2 Yankees favorites

Willie Randolph and Mel Stottlemyre both wore uniform No. 30 as players with the Yankees. In newspaper parlance, “-30-” means “end of story.” There is no more honorable end of the story for a former Yankees player than to have a plaque in Monument Park dedicated in his honor, which was bestowed on each of these fan favorites at Saturday’s 69th Old-Timers’ Day at Yankee Stadium.

They took separate paths to this special day as representatives of two distinctively different eras in franchise history and then joined together on manager Joe Torre’s coaching staff in the 1990s and 2000s to help steer the Yanks through a renewed period of glory.

Randolph’s plaque had been publicized as a prelude to the annual event. The one for Stottlemyre, however, was kept a secret from the former pitcher and pitching coach who has been battling multiple myeloma for the past 15 years. The Yankees could not be sure whether Stottlemyre could make the trip to New York from his home in Issaquah, Wash. His wife, Jean, worked with the Yankees behind the scenes to make a reality the idea conceived by principal owner Hal Steinbrenner.

“This is beyond a doubt the biggest surprise I’ve ever had,” Mel said to the crowd. “Today in this Stadium, there is no one that’s happier to be on this field than myself. I have been battling a dreaded disease for quite some time. I’ve had so much help from my family and I can’t say enough about you people, how supportive you’ve been for me over the years.”

For a man who grew up in Brooklyn, Randolph came full cycle with this ceremonial day. He has touched so many parts of baseball life in New York City from the sandlots and high school in Brownsville to second base and the third base coaching box in the Bronx to the manager’s office in Queens and now to that hallowed area beyond the center field wall at the Stadium.

Accompanied by his parents and surrounded by many former teammates and pupils, Randolph gave a moving speech to the crowd assembled for the Yankees’ annual reunion.

“I began living my dream at [age] 21,” he said, “and I am still living it at 61.”

Randolph came to the Yankees from the Pirates as an added player in a trade and quickly established himself as the regular second baseman under manager Billy Martin, another former Yankees second baseman, in 1976 when the Yankees won their first pennant in 12 years. Willie went on to play on World Series championship teams in 1977 and ’78 and on another Series team in 1981 that lost to the Dodgers. As a Yankees coach, he won four more rings in 1996 and from 1998-2000 and for clubs that played in the 2001 and ’03 Series.

The New York City connection was not missed on Randolph, who has long taken pride in his place in the city’s baseball history. With Saturday’s ceremony, he added to that legend in becoming only the sixth native New Yorker to receive a Monument Park plaque along with Hall of Famers Lou Gehrig (Manhattan), Phil Rizzuto (Brooklyn), Whitey Ford (Queens) and Joe Torre (Brooklyn) and owner Jacob Ruppert (Manhattan). The plaques for Randolph and Stottlemyre bring the total to 35 in Monument Park.

While success seemed to follow Randolph during his playing career, it eluded Stottlemyre after his rookie season of 1964 when he went 9-3 as a midseason callup and started three game of that year’s World Series in the Yankees’ losing effort against St. Louis.

“This is such a shock to me because that era that I played in is an era for the most part the Yankees have tried over the years to forget a little bit,” Stottlemyre said. “We went from being in the World Series in 1964 to fifth in 1965 and dead last in ’66. With a successful organization like the Yankees, they want to forget those years, I think, as fast as they possibly can. It does me a lot of good for something like this to happen because it tells everybody that I really was here.”

Stottlemyre, 73, was the ace of Yankees staffs during those down years and was a five-time All-Star who was 164-139 with a 2.97 ERA over his 11-season career (1964-74) with three 20-victory seasons and 40 career shutouts. After coaching stints with the Mariners, Mets (including the 1986 World Series title year) and Astros, Stottlemyre joined the Yankees as their pitching coach and won Series rings with them in 1996 and from 1998-2000.

One of his pitching disciples, Andy Pettitte, escorted Stottlemyre to the infield as the last player announced among the returning Old Timers that included Hall of Famers Reggie Jackson, Rickey Henderson, Wade Boggs, Goose Gossage, Ford and Torre as well as Bernie Williams, David Cone, Roy White, Paul O’Neill, Don Larsen, Lou Piniella, Gene Michael and Dr. Bobby Brown.

“I thought they forgot me,” Mel said. “There was no one left in the dugout. They sure know how to keep a secret around here.”

It is a secret no more. The Monument Park plaque is all either new member of the collection needs to know about his worth to a grateful organization. As a final tribute, the Yankees’ starting pitcher in the regularly-scheduled game against the Tigers was Nathan Eovaldi, the current wearer of uniform No. 30.

Marlins, Tigers & Phils in 8-game homestand

The Yankees return home Wednesday night for the first of eight games at Yankee Stadium. The stretch will feature a two-game series against the Marlins, featuring the major leagues’ home run leader Giancarlo Stanton, Wednesday and Thursday nights; a three-game set against the Tigers, featuring two-time American League Most Valuable Player Miguel Cabrera, Friday and Saturday nights and Sunday afternoon and a three-game, inter-league series against the Phillies Monday and Tuesday nights and next Wednesday afternoon.

The Yankees will celebrate the 69th Old-Timers’ Day Saturday. Fans are asked to be in their seats by 4 p.m. for the ceremonies with the traditional Old-Timers’ game to follow. All pregame festivities will be aired exclusively on the YES Network. The Yankees will then play the Tigers at 7:15 p.m., also airing on YES. Gates will open to ticket-holders at 3 p.m.

As part of pregame ceremonies, the Yankees will honor former team co-captain and coach Willie Randolph with a Monument Park plaque. Randolph spent 13 seasons playing for the Yankees from 1976-88 and ranks third on the organization’s all-time stolen bases list (251). The five-time American League All-Star (1976-77, ’80-81 and ’87) played in 37 postseason games with the Yankees from 1976-81 and won two World Series (1977-78). He also spent 11 seasons as a Yankees coach at third base coach from 1994-2003 and on the bench in 2004, earning four additional World Series rings (1996, ‘98-2000).

Thurman Munson Bobblehead Night will take place Thursday night. The first 18,000 people in attendance for the 7:05 p.m. game against the Marlins will receive a Munson bobblehead, courtesy of AT&T.

Ticket specials will run Wednesday, June 17 (MasterCard $5/Military Personnel/Student Game), Thursday, June 18 (Military Personnel Game), Sunday, June 21 (Youth Game), Monday, June 22 (Military Personnel Game), Tuesday, June 23 (Military Personnel Game) and Wednesday, June 24 (MasterCard Half-Price, Military Personnel, Senior Citizen, Student and Youth Game).

For a complete list of ticket specials, including game dates, seating locations, and terms and conditions, fans should visit Please note that all ticket specials are subject to availability.

The homestand will also feature the following promotional items and dates:

Wednesday, June 17 – Yankees vs. Marlins, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees BBQ Apron Night, presented by WFAN, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Monday, June 22 – Yankees vs. Phillies, 7:05 p.m.
* Alzheimer’s Awareness Cap Night, presented by New Era, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Tuesday, June 23 – Yankees vs. Phillies, 7:05 p.m.
* Collectible Cup Night, presented by Premio Foods, to the first 25,000 in attendance.

Wednesday, June 24 – Yankees vs. Phillies, 1:05 p.m.
* Dunkin’ Donuts Gift Card Day, presented to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Tickets may be purchased online at,, at the Yankee Stadium Ticket Office, via Ticketmaster phone at (877) 469-9849, Ticketmaster TTY at (800) 943-4327 and at all Ticket Offices located within Yankees Clubhouse Shops. Tickets may also be purchased on Yankees Ticket Exchange at, the only official online resale marketplace for Yankees fans to purchase and resell tickets to Yankees games. Fans with questions may call (212) YANKEES [926-5337] or email

For information on parking and public transportation options to Yankee Stadium, please visit and click on the Yankee Stadium tab at the top of the page.

Old-Timers’ party goes on to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre

The Yankees’ Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre affiliate will include a Yankees Legends Game Sunday at PNC Field in Moosic, Pa. After the 69th Annual Old-Timers’ Day takes place Saturday at Yankee Stadium, the Yankees Legends Game Sunday at PNC Field will honor 1978 World Series champion Brian Doyle. A portion of the proceeds from Sunday’s event will benefit the National Parkinson Foundation and the Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Interestingly, the Yankees will honor Willie Randolph with a plaque in Monument Park as part of the Old-Timers’ Day program. Doyle got his time on stage with the Yankees during the 1978 World Series when he played second base for an injured Randolph and batted .438 with a double and two RBI in the Yanks’ six-game triumph over the Dodgers.

The game itself will include Yankees Legends playing against each other. Additionally, the winners of an online auction to benefit Parkinson’s research will also receive the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of participating in the game. The festive atmosphere will be rounded out with a Father’s Day barbeque, live bands and post-game activities, including field access for games of catch, whiffle-ball, and photos in the team dugouts.

“Our top priority, in our first season as an ownership group, was to establish a stronger connection between the New York Yankees and the communities of Northeast Pennsylvania and Western New Jersey,” RailRiders co-managing owner David Abrams said. “This event is our way of thanking our fans by enabling them to see their Yankees heroes and interact with them in an intimate setting, while sharing a special Father’s Day with their families.”

“The idea for the event came after my friend Brian Doyle announced that he had Parkinson’s disease,” RailRiders’ co-owner Grant Cagle said. “Our partnership with the New York Yankees has made this game possible, and we are glad that so many former Yankees are showing their support for Brian by joining us for the day.”

More than 20 Yankees Legends are confirmed for the events, including Bucky Dent, Tommy John, Roy White, Charlie Hayes, Gene Michael, Ron Blomberg, Jesse Barfield, Jeff Nelson, Homer Bush, Graeme Lloyd, Oscar Gamble, Jim Coates and Hector Lopez. Additional Yankees participants will be announced in the coming weeks. For a full list of alumni participants, please visit

Gates will open at 12:30 p.m. in advance of the 2:05 p.m. first pitch. Ticket prices:
Bleachers / Lawn – $10
Field Reserve – $20
Infield Box – $30
Mohegan Sun Club Level – $40
VIP Tickets – $150 (includes game ticket and pre-and post-game lunch and VIP reception with Yankees Legends).

All fans will receive a commemorative game ticket as well. Father’s Day barbeque commences at 3:30 p.m., and costs $25 for adults, $12 for children under 12, and is free for children under 2.
To purchase tickets or for more information, please call (570) 969-BALL (2255), buy online at or via the RailRiders website at

Here’s a number you’ll never forget, Bernie

In terms of profile and temperament, Bernie Williams and New York would not seem a comfortable fit. The city that never sleeps was the incubator that gave the culture such over-the-top performers from Cagney to Streisand to DeNiro, not to mention such flamboyant out-of-town athletes who conquered the Big Apple’s hard core, from Dempsey to Mantle to Namath.

But Bernie Williams? Bob Sheppard, the late majestic voice of Yankee Stadium, noted that even the syllables of Williams’ name failed to conjure up images of greatness. Except for his Puerto Rican heritage, which he shared with many Bronx residents, Williams did not appear to have much in common with the population of the borough that the Yankees call home which traditionally has revered players who thrive on being the center of attention.

Towards the end of the 2005 season when his tenure with the Yankees was drawing to a close, fans at the Stadium finally stood up and took notice at Williams on a regular basis with standing ovations before and after each of his plate appearances. Bernie Williams was at center stage at last. The outpouring of affection was a belated tribute by Yankees fans for all Williams meant to the franchise in one of the most significant periods of its glorious history.

And the penultimate experience occurs Sunday night when a packed Stadium will shower Williams with an abundance of affection as the Yankees will honor him with a plaque in Monument Park and officially retire his uniform No. 51. No player has worn that number since Williams’ last season 10 years ago, even the two who had worn it with distinction in Seattle, Randy Johnson and Ichiro Suzuki. After coming to the Yankees in trades from the Mariners, Johnson wore No. 41 and Suzuki No. 31.

Bernie Williams'  No. 51 joins Monument Park retirement list.

Bernie Williams’ No. 51 joins Monument Park retirement list.

While other teammates drew greater cheers and headlines over the years, Williams was the calming center of a team that went from spit to shinola in the 1990’s to complete a resounding history of baseball in the Bronx. The quiet, contemplative, switch-hitting center fielder batted cleanup in lineups that produced four World Series championships, including three in a row, over the last five years of the 20th century and the first year of the 21st.

Of all the players who took part in the Yankees’ extraordinary run during that period, Williams was the only one who was there when it all began, when the club started to make strides toward decency in 1992 and improved to such an extent that by the middle of the decade was on the verge of yet another dynastic era.

Yes, that Bernie Williams, whose way with a guitar rivaled that of his handling of bat and glove. Williams’ love of the guitar was so strong that he was just as much in awe of meeting Les Paul and Paul McCartney as he was shaking hands with Whitey Ford and Yogi Berra. Yet it is in the latter’s company that Williams will always hold a special place in Yankees lore.

It is a past as eventful as any in franchise history. Williams’ rankings on the Yankees’ career lists include third in doubles (449), singles (1,545) and intentional walks (97); fourth in at-bats (7,869); fifth in plate appearances (9,053), hits (2,336), bases on balls (1,069), times on base (3,444) and sacrifice flies( 64); sixth in games (2,076), total bases (3,756), extra-base hits (791) and runs (1,366) and seventh in home runs (287) and runs batted in (1,257). He is one of only 10 players who played 16 or more seasons only with the Yankees. The others are Lou Gehrig, Bill Dickey, Frankie Crosetti, Yogi Berra, Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford, Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera and Derek Jeter.

Not bad for an unassuming man who was often the cruel butt of jokes by veteran teammates when he came into the majors in 1991. “Bambi” was the nickname Mel Hall, Steve Sax, Jesse Barfield and others hung on Williams, a suggestion that his non-confrontational demeanor and love for classical guitar music somehow made him unfit for the rigors of professional sports.

As it turned out, Williams not only turned the other cheek but also left the gigglers in the dust. He carved out for himself a career that is superior to all his old tormentors and one that just might make him a serious candidate for the National Baseball Hall of Fame some day.

Williams batted .297 over those 16 seasons, with a .381 on-base average and .477 slugging percentage. He won a batting title, four Gold Gloves for fielding, a Silver Slugger for hitting and was named to five All-Star teams.

Even more impressive are Williams’ post-season numbers. He ranks second in most major offensive categories – games (121), at-bats (465), runs (83), hits (128), total bases (223), singles (77) and total bases (202). In each case, Williams is second to long-time teammate Derek Jeter. Williams is also the runner-up in post-season home runs (22) to Manny Ramirez and walks (77) to Chipper Jones.

Williams is the only player in post-season history to hit home runs from both sides of the plate in one game, and he did it twice, in the 1995 American League Division Series against the Mariners and in the 1996 AL Division Series against the Rangers. Also in ‘96, he was the Most Valuable Player of the AL Championship Series victory over the Orioles.

The World Series victory over the Braves that followed remained a key moment in Williams’ career. Years later, he noted, “The World Series gives you confidence. Whenever a team goes through adversity, every player who has been to the World Series knows that this is the beauty of the game, how great it is. We don’t just play for the money or the records. There’s a reason to be the best. We realized it [in ‘96], not just because we won it, but the way we won it. We were down by two games, and we went down to Atlanta and swept the Braves. That taught us a lot about the game, what it means.”

Williams was distraught in the 1997 post-season when he was 2-for-17 in the ALDS loss to the Indians, a setback that seemed to galvanize the Yankees as they came back to win three straight World Series. They were memorable seasons for Williams, who won his batting title in 1998 with a .339 average to go with 26 home runs and 97 RBI and had an even better year in ‘99, batting .342 with 25 home runs and 115 RBI. His best overall season was in 2000, batting .307 with 30 home runs and 121 RBI.

Not even Yankees scout Fred Ferreira, with the recommendation of Roberto Rivera, who signed Williams to a contract Sept. 13, 1985, his 17th birthday, could have foreseen such a career, particularly in the heady atmosphere of center field at the Stadium that had been patrolled by Earle Combs, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Bobby Murcer and Mickey Rivers.

Bernabe Figueroa Williams was born in San Juan in 1968 and grew up in Vega Alta, P.R., where he played high school ball with future two-time AL MVP Juan Gonzalez. Williams’ parents also instilled in him a love for music, which proved a sustaining force at times when his baseball career became over-challenging.

One of the oddities of Williams’ time with the Yankees was that he was frequently the only player in the batting order who did not have a special song played for him when he came to bat, a practice that became prominent at ballparks in the ‘90s. Williams’ interest in music was so intense that he considered listening to a “theme song” before a plate appearance a distraction.

During Williams’ rise through the minors, the Yankees weren’t quite sure how to use him. Despite being fleet afoot, Williams lacked the larcenous behavior to be an effective base stealer, which made him less than an attractive leadoff hitter despite an excellent on-base percentage. His legs helped him run down any fly ball, but his throwing arm was never particularly strong or accurate

But in the early ‘90s, the Yankees were in no position to be over picky about prospects. When injuries cut into the playing time of outfielders Roberto Kelly and Danny Tartabull, Williams was summoned to the majors and the slow apprenticeship began. Brought along slowly by managers Stump Merrill and Buck Showalter, Williams came into his own in 1993 and took control of center field at Yankee Stadium, the most sacred patch of ground in the majors, for the next 10 years.

His breakthrough year was 1995 when Williams batted .307 with 18 home runs and 82 RBI and followed that by hitting .429 with two home runs and five RBI in 21 at-bats in the grueling, five-game ALDS loss to the Mariners, an exciting series that helped “sell” the new concept of an expanded round of playoffs.

Joe Torre arrived the next season, and while some of Williams’ eccentricities had the new manager shaking his head on occasion was won over by his almost childlike enthusiasm.

“I don’t think there is anything about Bernie that could surprise me – take that as a plus or a minus,” Torre told last year. “That’s just his personality, just him, basically. He’s very different in that he is not your typical baseball player. That’s probably why he was a little more sensitive than other players.”

But with that sensitivity also came with Williams a sense of loyalty. Despite being wooed by the Red Sox and the Diamondbacks when he was eligible for free agency after the 1998 season, Williams contacted Yankees general manager Brian Cashman and the sides worked out a seven-year contract for $87 million that kept Bernie in pinstripes.

Williams had been hopeful he could have played for the Yankees in 2007, but there was no longer a role for him. So the soft-spoken center fielder, now 46, enjoys a satisfying retirement and continues to write music. His 2003 CD, “The Journey Within,” drew praise from the likes of McCartney, Bruce Springsteen and Paul Simon.

“Don’t let your job define who you are,” Williams once said. “Your relationships will define who you are. No matter what you do in life, you are going to be in a position to make an impact on somebody’s life. In my experience with the Yankees, these are a few of the thing that I have learned. You’ve got to have a plan of action, you have to stay focused on the things you can control, and don’t get discouraged or distracted by the things you cannot control.”


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