Results tagged ‘ Yankee Stadium ’

How appropriate; Jeter wins his last Stadium game

So it turned out what Derek Jeter needed most in his final game at Yankee Stadium was Mariano Rivera. Then again, if Mo had been available to close out Thursday night’s game, it might not have had the dramatic finish it did.

Appropriate is the key word to describe the finish of the Yankees’ 6-5 victory over the Orioles in the Captain’s last appearance in the home pinstripes. All week long Yankees manager Joe Girardi was asked what gesture he was contemplating for Jeter’s farewell. The skipper kept saying he would consult with Jeter, who did the one thing he has always done over 20 seasons in the major leagues — play the game until the last out.

Who else was better to win Jeter’s Stadium finale than Jeter? He fought back emotion in the last two innings after the Yankees had grabbed a three-run lead but reverted to the cool demeanor that has defined him to be in place to get the game-winning hit in the bottom of the ninth inning. It was achieved with his familiar inside-out swing, a single to right field that delivered pinch runner Antoan Richardson to the plate to end as astonishing an evening as there ever has been at either Yankee Stadium.

David Robertson, who succeeded Rivera as the Yankees’ closer, had a nightmare of a ninth inning by giving up a two-run home run to Adam Jones and a solo shot with two out to Steve Pearce that tied the score and threatened to ruin the night for Jeter. Rivera as well as other old teammates Bernie Williams, Jorge Posada, Andy Pettitte, Tino Martinez and Gerald Williams and former manager Joe Torre were in attendance as well as Derek’s parents and his sister and nephew among a crowd of 48,613, the largest this year at the Stadium.

The blown save actually created the possibility that Jeter could be the hero. He had already contributed to the Yankees’ attack with a run-scoring double in the first inning and an RBI fielder’s choice in the seventh when the Yankees went up by a 5-2 score.

Imagine if Girardi had sent Brendan Ryan out to play shortstop in the top of the ninth to let Jeter get a standing ovation leaving the field? What a revolting development that would have been.

Two minor-league call-ups helped frame the bottom of the ninth for the Yankees. Jose Pirela led off with a single past third base. Richardson ran for Pirela and was sacrificed to second by Brett Gardner. I will not use the phrase “those remaining in the crowd” because I doubt anyone left the game before it ended. Up came Jeter to another crescendo of cheers. That was nothing compared to what came next. Jeter’s single was worth the price of every expensive ticket, the hottest one all year in New York.

His current teammates mobbed Jeter on the base path between first while his former comrades looked on approvingly. Hugs and high fives abounded. Jeter walked around the infield waving his cap in acknowledging the fans in every section of the Stadium.

He then walked slowly to the shortstop position, the only one he has ever played on a major-league diamond, and squatted in an almost religious gesture. He said afterward that he will not play shortstop again. He will go to Boston for the Yankees’ final three games of the season and out of respect for Red Sox fans plans to play but as a designated hitter only.

Jeter’s last season was nowhere near his best, but at 40 playing one of the game’s most demanding positions he stayed healthy and made it through 143 of the team’s 159 games. His hit gave the Yankees victory No. 82, guaranteeing them a winning season for the 22nd consecutive year. Jeter never had a losing season in the majors. The Captain also saved his best for last. In his final home stand, Jeter batted .353 with five runs, four doubles, one home run and nine RBI in 34 at-bats.

His Stadium numbers are also impressive. Jeter played in 1,390 regular-season games in the Bronx — 1,004 at the old Stadium and 386 at the current Stadium. He combined to hit .313 with 1,012 runs, 273 doubles, 30 triples, 138 home runs, 666 RBI and 193 stolen bases in 5,514 at-bats.

It is hard to believe that this tremendous career has come to an end. I was able to get a quiet moment with DJ before the game. I am not going to Boston and wanted to say my goodbyes and tell him how much I enjoyed watching him play and thank him for his cooperation over the years.

It was also the end of an era. Jeter, Posada, Pettite, Rivera and Bernie Williams are the only players I have covered in a 40-year career as a baseball writer from their first day of spring training to their last game at Yankee Stadium. They are the Core Four Plus One. Jeter’s retirement ends all that. But what an ending!

Commissioner honors Jeter with prestigious award

The accolades keep coming Derek Jeter’s way in his final week of regular-season play. Despite all these goodbyes, there is the possibility however remote that the Yankees could get to play in October since they have not yet been mathematically eliminated from the post-season.

Commissioner Bud Selig, himself at the end of his career, made his farewell-tour stop at Yankee Stadium Tuesday and presented Jeter with the Commissioner’s Historic Achievement Award, an honor created in 1998 to take note of special accomplishments in the game. Mariano Rivera received the award last year in his last season. Earlier this month, legendary Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully also received the award. Jeter is the 15th recipient of the award.

Speaking at a news conference before Tuesday night’s Yankees-Orioles game, Selig said, “When I was kid, as I reminisced the other day, my favorite player was Joe DiMaggio. What Joe D meant to my generation, Derek has meant to his. I’ve been overjoyed to see Derek join the heroes of my youth — Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Mickey Mantle and all the other greats. He is a great champion in every way.”

“It means a lot for the commissioner to take the time and present me with this award,” Jeter said. “I’ve always had the utmost respect for him throughout my career. As he said, our careers have paralleled. He is the only commissioner that I played under. We had a great relationship throughout the years. For him to take the time to present me with this award that hasn’t been handed out too much, it is something that I will definitely cherish.”

The commissioner also presented on behalf of Major League Baseball a check for $222,222.22 to Jeter’s Turn2 Foundation, which brings the total of donations to the Captain’s charity on his farewell tour across the majors to more than $575,000. MLB’s donation equaled that of the Yankees’ gift of $222,222.22, which they presented on Derek Jeter day at the Stadium Sept. 7.

Gates will open an hour earlier for last 3 night games

The Yankees will open the gates at Yankee Stadium one hour earlier for the final three 7:05 p.m. regular season home games. Gates will open at 4 p.m. to all ticketed fans Monday, Sept. 22; Tuesday, Sept. 23; and Thursday, Sept. 25, against the Orioles.

The early gate openings will give ticketed fans the chance to watch Yankees batting practice during the team’s final home series of the regular season. Gates will open at 11 a.m. for the Orioles-Yankees day game Wednesday, Sept. 24, because the Yanks are not scheduled to take batting practice prior to the game.

Fans who choose to watch BP and infield workouts from a seat other than their own may remain until 45 minutes after the gates open or until the fans with tickets for those seats arrive. At that time, fans will be asked to return to their seats.

Only fans with Yankees Premium tickets may access their respective Yankees Premium areas (i.e., tickets for the Legends Suite, Champions Suite, Field MVP Outdoor Suite Boxes, Delta SKY360° Suite, SAP Suite Level suites or Jim Beam Suite). On certain game days, the Yankees may elect not to take batting practice, infield workouts or both.

Jeter was right to wait to celebrate

There is no use trying to avoid what is going on with the Yankees these closing days of the season. A playoff berth remains a mathematical possibility but only by the slimmest of margins. Yanks manager Joe Girardi said at the start of the recent trip to Baltimore and St. Petersburg, Fla., that the Yankees needed to win every game, and they proceeded to lost five of seven.

They returned to Yankee Stadium Thursday night to begin their final homestand of the season. Despite the dire circumstances of the Yanks’ position in the standings, the Stadium had a buzz to it in the crowd that was by no means capacity but was nevertheless enthusiastic.

Perhaps the reason could have something to do with the person playing shortstop for the Yankees. This is Derek Jeter’s last hurrah at the Stadium, and that may be enough to keep the folks in the seats keeping the faith.

The Captain did not disappoint the faithful, either. Coming off a dreadful trip during which he had a hitless string stretch to 28 at-bats, Jeter got the crowd cheering in the first inning when he beat out a grounder to deep shortstop for a single. The assembled got to roar their approval five innings later when DJ ripped a 3-1 knuckleball from R.A. Dickey to right field for a home run, the cap’s first dinger in 158 at-bats since Aug. 1 at Boston.

As fiercely as the crowd reacted to the blow, Jeter declined to take a curtain call, which is typical of him. The homer made the score 2-0 Yankees with too much baseball left in the game to celebrate at that point. He did not go into the dumps when he was 0-for-28, so he was not going to do any flips for hitting his first home run in six weeks. Never too high, never too low; that defines the Captain.

Indeed, the game was not over by any means. Dellin Betances preserved the shutout work by Shane Greene by getting the final out of the seventh, but Shawn Kelley gave up a game-tying home run to Jose Bautista on a 0-2 pitch with two out in the eighth.

Kelley hung his head as Bautista circled the bases on his 33rd homer of the season as well the pitcher should have. After fouling off a 94-mph fastball back to the screen on 0-1, Bautista made a gesture indicating he just missed a pitch he should have creamed. Kelley threw the same pitch on the next delivery to the same spot, and this time Bautista did not miss it but powered into the left field seats.

After Jeter flied out leading off the home eighth, quite a few fans headed for the exits assuming that he would not bat again. They missed a dramatic finish as the Yankees won, 3-2, on a walk-off error.

Chris Young, who seems to be in the middle of what good things the Yankees have done recently, led off the inning against Aaron Sanchez with a single to center. Antoan Richardson ran for Young and promptly stole second base.

With the count 3-0, Brett Gardner surprised the crowd, not to mention Girardi, by attempting to bunt. He fouled off the pitch and the next one as well as the count went full. Gardy tried one more and dropped a two-strike bunt for a sacrifice to get Richardson to third base. Gardner, bunting on his own, told Girardi in the dugout that Sanchez’s ball was running so much he did not think he could pull him.

The Blue Jays brought the infield in and got what they wanted when Chase Headley hit a ground ball to the right side, but first baseman Aaron Lind let the ball get by him that gave the Yankees another day of hope. They gained a game on the Athletics for the second wild-card spot but still trail by five games with 10 to play.

Yankees Magazine celebrates Jeter’s career

Thursday night marked the beginning of Derek Jeter’s last homestand as his appearance at Yankee Stadium has been reduced to eight games — four against the Blue Jays through Sunday and four against the Orioles next week.

Fans attending any of these games should purchase a copy of the Derek Jeter Commemorative Edition of Yankees Magazine, a 128-page look at the various aspects of this remarkable 20-year career in the major leagues of a player who now holds some of the most important records in franchise history, including most games and most hits.

The Yankees Magazine staff outdid itself with this issue. Nathan Maciborski starts things off with a review of the Captain’s career, and the YES Network’s Jack Curry ends it with an appreciation of Jeter’s impact throughout the world. In between there are comments from Hall of Famers in all sports and Yankees teammates and executives about Jeter.

Jon Schwartz wrote a fine profile of Dick Groch, the scout who signed Jeter. There is a special centerfold highlighting the important hits of Jeter’s career, edited by Kristina Dodge. Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News contributed a story about Jeter’s memories of Fenway Park, hostile territory where DJ had some of his biggest moments.

Alfred Santasiere III had a sit-down with Jeet and “Mr. Cub,” Ernie Banks, and conducted question-and-answer sessions with two other Hall of Fame shortstops, Cal Ripken Jr. and Ozzie Smith. Also featured is Santasiere’s article from three years ago about Jeter’s return to his hometown of Kalamazoo, Mich.

Santasiere also did an exclusive interview with Derek’s parents, Charles and Dorothy Jeter, who comment separately about the special incidents in their son’s life and career.

And then there are the pictures — hundreds of them from staff photographers Ariele Goldman Hecht and Matt Ziegler, plus an array of photos from Derek Jeter Day Sept. 7 from contributing photographer Tom DiPace.

There are plenty of memories Yankees fans can take away from Derek Jeter’s career. Many of them are encased in this issue, which will be available at Stadium souvenir shops throughout the homestand.

Hispanic Heritage Month events at Stadium

The Yankees’ continued celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month in September includes the first Latino Baseball Hall of Fame in-stadium photo exhibit, the appearance of Grammy Award-winning artist Arturo Sandoval at a Yankees game and the third edition of Yankees Magazine En Español, the Spanish-language issue of the club’s official game-day program.

Last Saturday, the Yankees and the Latino Baseball Hall of Fame held a ribbon-cutting ceremony at Yankee Stadium celebrating the latter’s first in-stadium photo exhibit. Located on the concourse outside of the New York Yankees Museum presented by Bank of America, the exhibit features images of all of the Latino Baseball Hall of Fame’s past inductees and recognizes the contributions that professional Latino ballplayers have made to the growth of the game. It will be available for viewing through Sunday, Sept. 21, free of charge for all fans attending Yankees home games or for those who purchase a ticket for a Yankee Stadium Tour presented by MasterCard.

“The history of baseball in Latin America is long and illustrious, which is why the creation of the Latino Baseball Hall of Fame makes sense,” Yankees Director of Latino Affairs Manuel Garcia said. “Having an institution such as this is not only important for the recognition of so many superstars, but also for the promotion of our national pastime on the international stage. We are excited to have this photo exhibit in our stadium. I know our fans will enjoy it.”

Thursday, Cuban jazz trumpeter, pianist and composer Arturo Sandoval will perform “God Bless America” during the Yankees’ game against the Rays. The 10-time Grammy Award winner has performed with the likes of Celine Dion, Alicia Keys and Justin Timberlake and contributed composing work on the underscore of the HBO movie based on his life, For Love or Country, starring Andy Garcia.

“Arturo Sandoval, a protégé of Dizzy Gillespie, is not only a legendary musician with 10 Grammy Awards but also a great representative of the American dream,” Garcia said. “From his well known defection from Cuba to his receipt of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013 at the White House, he is a symbol of what the United States is truly about. We are honored to have him perform ‘God Bless America’ September 11 at Yankee Stadium.”

Yankees Magazine has served as the team’s game-day program since its inception in 1980 and has strived to exceed the expectations normally associated with a team-based periodical. The third Spanish-language issue of Yankees Magazine En Español continues the publication’s dedication to serve its loyal readers in new and engaging ways. The magazine can be purchased online at http://www.yankees.com/publications and http://www.yankeesbeisbol.com or by phone at (800) GO-YANKS [800-469-2657].

Earlier this month, the Yankees kicked off the Hispanic Heritage Month celebration with an on-field ceremony recognizing the Carlos Beltran Scholarship Program at Hostos Community College. In conjunction with the Carlos Beltran Foundation, the program granted scholarships, based on merit and financial need, to six deserving Hostos students which has allowed each student to continue to attain their respective educational goals.

The Yankees also celebrated the Raiders Baseball team of the Bronx, Dominican Republic Tourism and the eighth-annual Hispanic Heritage Month Community Achievement Awards, which recognizes those who serve Bronx residents in the areas of the arts (Bronx Museum of the Arts), athletics (South Bronx United), business (Mastermind Ltd.) and education (P.S. 73).

Fans can learn more about these and other events by visiting the team’s official Spanish-language website, http://www.yankeesbeisbol.com and clicking on the special Hispanic Heritage Month section.

Yanks come back from Ortiz blasts

Judging from crowd reaction, there is probably no opposing player Yankees fans enjoy watching make out than David Ortiz. Loud cheers accompany every strikeout or batted ball that settles in a Yankees’ fielder’s glove.

And this has happened with the Red Sox noted designated hitter more times than you might think. Although he entered Thursday night’s game with a .310 average and 42 home runs in his career against the Yankees, Ortiz was a .241 hitter with eight home runs at Yankee Stadium.

Ortiz improved those numbers in his first two at-bats against Chris Capuano with a couple of home runs in staking Boston to a 3-0 lead in the third inning. With two out in the first, Ortiz ripped a lazar of a line drive off a 0-1 fastball that just cleared the wall in right field.

Two innings later with one out and a runner on first, Ortiz jumped on a first-pitch slider that hung and got stung into the right field bleachers. Ortiz’s 46th multi-homer game raised his season total to 32. There were no wild cheers in the stands either time, just a collection of ooohs and aahhs that such demonstrative displays with the bat from an opponent can generate.

And that explains why the cheers are so loud at the Stadium when he makes an out.

When it came to loud cheering, Derek Jeter earned that in the bottom of the third with a booming drive to the warning track in center field for a two-run double off Red Sox righthander Brandon Workman that cut the margin to 3-2.

It was the 540th two-base hit of Jeter’s career, which tied him with Hall of Famers Dave Winfield and Joe Medwick for 32nd place on the all-time list. More cheers were to come when Jeter raced home to tie the score on a two-out, ground single to right-center by Carlos Beltran.

Yankees fans finally got to shout at Ortiz in the fifth. One out after he gave up a tie-breaking homer to another left-handed hitter, Brock Holt, Capuano was spared another encounter with Ortiz and was replaced by lefthander Rich Hill, who used a tantalizing, 75-mph curve to strike him out to the absolute delight of Yankees fans.

September is Derek Jeter Month at Stadium

The Yankees will celebrate the career of Derek Jeter during the month of September. Named the 11th captain in team history on June 3, 2003, Jeter is the Yankees’ all-time leader in hits (3,445), games (2,723), stolen bases (357), at-bats (11,108), singles (2,581), doubles (539) and hit by pitches (168). He ranks sixth on Major League Baseball’s all-time hits list and has the most hits of any shortstop in the game’s history.

Derek Jeter Day will be Sunday, Sept. 7 at Yankee Stadium. Prior to the scheduled 1:05 p.m. game against the Royals, former teammates, family members and other guests are expected to take part in a special ceremony highlighting Jeter’s career. Fans are encouraged to be in their seats by noon.

As part of the day’s celebration, the Yankees will wear a patch depicting Jeter’s final season logo on the left sleeve of their uniform and cap. The patch will be worn by the team from Sept. 7 through the end of the 2014 season.

New Era recently introduced a limited-edition Derek Jeter Collectible Cap Set. The collection includes three hats that celebrate Jeter’s five World Championships, his 3,000 hits milestone and his upcoming retirement. Only 2,014 units have been created and are currently being sold exclusively at Stadium team stores while supplies last.

Beginning Thursday, Sept. 18, Yankees fans will also have the opportunity to purchase a limited-edition Derek Jeter commemorative issue of Yankees Magazine, the team’s official game-day program. The special issue will provide an exclusive look back at Jeter’s career in pinstripes, from his first mention in the publication in 1992 through coverage of the Sept. 7 ceremony.

Among highlights to be featured include a complete retrospective of Jeter’s 20-year career, a Q&A with Jeter and Ernie Banks, his parents’ recollection of his development from young Yankees fan to the franchise’s 11th captain, and a four-panel centerpiece featuring a graphical retelling of Jeter’s career highlights.

The limited-edition commemorative publication will be available for purchase at Yankee Stadium, by calling 800-GO-YANKS [800-469-2657] or by visiting http://www.yankees.com/jetershop.

As part of a special pregame tribute video to be shown at the Stadium prior to Jeter’s final regular season home game Thursday, Sept. 25, a Yankees film crew will be taking to the streets of New York to gather personal tributes and thank you’s from Yankees fans.

The Yankees are also conducting a “One Word for 2” social media campaign throughout September on the team’s official Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts. Each day during the month, players and fans will be featured on each respective platform providing one word that they feel best describes Jeter along with their reasons for choosing it. Fans can tweet @Yankees or visit facebook.com/yankees and instagram.com/yankees to participate.

Tickets for remaining 2014 Yankees home games may be purchased online at http://www.yankees.com, http://www.yankeesbeisbol.com, at the Stadium ticket office, via Ticketmaster phone at 877-469-9849, Ticketmaster TTY at 800-943-4327 and at all ticket offices located within Yankees Clubhouse Shops. Tickets may also be purchased on Yankees Ticket Exchange at http://www.yankees.com/yte, the only official online resale marketplace for Yankees fans to purchase and resell tickets to Yankees games. Fans with questions may call 212-YANKEES [926-5337] or email tickets@yankees.com.

Jeter does flip-flop on farewell tour

Derek Jeter got to return the favor Sunday at Yankee Stadium to Paul Konerko, who was the White Sox representative when the Captain was honored earlier this year at U.S. Cellular Field.

Derek Jeter got to return the favor Sunday at Yankee Stadium to Paul Konerko, who was the White Sox representative when the Captain was honored earlier this year at U.S. Cellular Field.


Derek Jeter got to participate in this farewell-tour stuff from the other side Sunday at Yankee Stadium.

Jeter has been feted at ballparks across North America in his 20th and final season in the major leagues. Sunday, the Captain took on the role of presenter to another popular veteran who is playing in his last season in the majors, Paul Konerko. In a brief, pregame ceremony, Jeter on behalf of the Yankees organization presented a first base bag to Konerko, who has been a first baseman for the majority of his 18 big-league seasons, the past 16 with the White Sox.

Konerko has played sparingly (69 games) this season as a back-up player for Chicago and wanted to be in the lineup for his last regular-season game at the Stadium, one of his favorite parks, so manager Robin Ventura started him as the designated hitter and batting sixth. Entering the game, Konerko was a .327 career hitter with 24 home runs and 59 RBI in 196 at-bats at the Stadium.

Torre tribute to highlight homestand

Joe Torre will have his uniform number retired Saturday at Yankee Stadium.

Joe Torre will have his uniform number retired Saturday at Yankee Stadium.

A tribute to former manager and new Hall of Famer Joe Torre, whose uniform No. 6 will be retired, will be at the center of the Yankees’ homestand that began Tuesday night with the opener of a three-game series against the Astros to be followed by a three-game set against the White Sox.

Joe Torre Day is scheduled for Saturday. Torre will not only have his number uniform retired but also will be honored with a plaque in Monument Park, the fourth new one this year joining Goose Gossage, Tino Martinez and Paul O’Neill. Family members, former players and other guests are expected to participate. Fans are encouraged to arrive early and be in their seats by noon.

Torre spent 12 seasons as Yankees manager from 1996 through 2007. He led the team to six World Series appearances (1996, ’98-2001, ’03) and four championships (1996, ’98-2000). He compiled a regular-season record of 1,173-767-2 (.605), a postseason mark of 76-47 (.618) and guided the club to the playoffs in each of his managerial seasons. Torre’s Yankees teams went 21-11 in the World Series, 27-14 in the American League Championship Series and 28-22 in the AL Division Series. His regular-season victory total is second in club history to Joe McCarthy, who had a 1,460-867 (.627) record over 16 seasons.

Ticket specials will run Tuesday, (Military Personnel Game), Wednesday, (Military Personnel and Student Game), Thursday, (MasterCard half-price, Military Personnel and Senior Citizen Game) and Saturday (Youth Game).

For a complete list of ticket specials, including game dates, seating locations, and terms and conditions, fans should visit http://www.yankees.com/ticketspecials. Please note that all ticket specials are subject to availability.

The homestand will also feature the following promotional items and dates:

Tuesday, August 19 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
Yankees USB Car Charger Night, presented by Avis, to first 18,000 customers, 21 and older.

Wednesday, August 20 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
Joe Girardi Bobblehead Night, presented by AT&T, to first 18,000 customers.

Thursday, August 21 – Yankees vs. Astros, 1:05 p.m.
Masahiro Tanaka Poster Day, presented by Catch 24 Advertising, to first 18,000 customers, 14 and younger.

Friday, August 22 – Yankees vs. White Sox, 7:05 p.m.
Yankees Water Bottle Night, presented by Budweiser, to first 18,000 customers, 21 and older.

Sunday, August 24 – Yankees vs. White Sox, 1:05 p.m.
Yankees Hello Kitty Bobblehead Day, presented to first 18,000 customers, 14 and younger.

Tickets may be purchased online at http://www.yankees.com, http://www.yankeesbeisbol.com, at the Yankee Stadium Ticket Office, via Ticketmaster phone at 877-469-9849, Ticketmaster TTY at 800-943-4327 and at all Ticket Offices located within Yankees Clubhouse Shops. Tickets may also be purchased on Yankees Ticket Exchange at http://www.yankees.com/yte, the only official online resale marketplace for Yankees fans to purchase and resell tickets to Yankees games. Fans with questions may call 212-YANKEES (926-5337) or email tickets@yankees.com.

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