Results tagged ‘ Yankee Stadium ’

Tanaka gem ends home losing streak

It took six tries, but the Yankees finally guaranteed themselves another winning season at Yankee Stadium. At the same time, they saved some face in a long, exasperating weekend against the front-running Blue Jays.

Sunday’s 5-0 triumph behind a determined Masahiro Tanaka was the Yankees’ 41st victory at the Stadium this year, which extended their stretch of consecutive winning seasons at home to 24 (since 1992). It is the longest current winning streak in the major leagues and the most since the Yankees’ big-league record of 47 winning seasons at home from 1918 through 1964.

It ended a five-game losing streak at the Stadium and followed a twin killing Saturday in a miserably long day. Yankees manager Joe Girardi said before the game that the team needed a well-pitched game more than anything, and Tanaka gave him all he could have wanted and more.

The Japanese righthander shut down the Blue Jays on four hits and no walks over seven innings and 108 pitches. Tanaka has given up only one earned run in 16 innings against Toronto’s powerful lineup this year.

“Location” was Girardi’s response for why Tanaka has done so well against a Blue Jays team that leads the American League in runs and home runs. “He was down in the zone all day. He had a good splitter, a good slider and worked in a cutter as well.”

Tanaka also helped himself with a pickoff play at second base that nailed Kevin Pillar, who had doubled with one out in the second inning. It was a rough weekend for Pillar, who was 1-for-13 at the plate and ran into his teammate, shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, who is out indefinitely due to a small crack in his left shoulder blade.

There were contributions all around in the Yankees’ victory that moved them back to 3 1/2 games behind the Blue Jays in the AL East and ended a personal seven-game winning streak by former National League Cy Young Award winner R.A. Dickey.

Dustin Ackley, who joined the Yankees in a trade from Seattle only to land on the disabled list because of a back ailment, knocked in three runs with a sacrifice fly in the second and his first home run in pinstripes, a two-run shot in the fourth.

Girardi decided to start Ackley at first base when he found out that Greg Bird, who has played there primarily since the season-ending injury to Mark Teixeira, had faced a knuckleball pitcher only once in the minor leagues. Ackley, on the other hand, had some success against Dickey and continued it Sunday. In 13 career at-bats against Dickey, Ackley is batting .462 with two home runs.

“The simple approach is better,” Ackley said of hitting knuckleball pitchers. “He was running the ball inside. I just looked for the first good one over the plate. The important thing is to get out in front and not stay back and let the knuckleball move too much.”

Alex Rodriguez, who was honored by the Yankees in a pregame ceremony for his 3,000th hit earlier in the season, showed some hustle in the second scoring from third base on a sacrifice fly by Didi Gregorius. A-Rod also drove in a run with a two-out double in the eighth that ended Dickey’s outing.

Brett Gardner, who had a huge day at the plate Saturday (4-for-9, three home runs, seven RBI) took a 0-for-4 collar Sunday but made two outstanding running catches in left field to take away potential extra-base hits from Justin Smoak in the seventh and Matt Hague in the ninth.

“Everybody is relieved that we are going on the road [to Tampa Bay] with confidence,” Ackley said.

Alex Rodriguez with family and Yankees chief operating officer Lonn Trost in pregame celebration of his 3,000th hit.

Alex Rodriguez with family and Yankees chief operating officer Lonn Trost in pregame celebration of his 3,000th hit.

Tulowitzki knocked out of game

Troy Tulowitzki, a key figure in the Blue Jays’ renaissance the past two months, had to come out of the first game of Saturday’s doubleheader at Yankee Stadium in the third inning after colliding with center fielder Kevin Pillar.

Tulowitzki was tracking a pop fly to shallow center field by Didi Gregorius and made the catch for the third out of the second inning in front of a charging Pillar, who ran into the shortstop. Tulowitzki dropped the ball from his glove and then fell to the ground on his back and stretched his legs into the air. He lay on the field for several minutes and was attended to by a trainer before he walked off the field under his own power.

When Toronto took the field again in the bottom of the third inning, Tulowitzki did not join his teammates. Cliff Pennington entered the game at second base with Ryan Goins moving to shortstop.

X-rays of Tulowitzki’s chest and ribs were negative, but an MRI exam revealed upper back muscle bruises and a small crack in his left shoulder blade.

Tulowitzki and relief pitcher LaTroy Hawkins came to Toronto July 28 in a trade from Colorado that involved shortstop Jose Reyes going to the Rockies. Tulowitzki, who struck out in his only at-bat Saturday, is hitting .232 with five home runs and 17 RBI in 38 games and 155 at-bats since the trade, and the Blue Jays have a 29-8 record when he is in the starting lineup. Toronto was in third place in the American League East and eight games behind the first-place Yankees the day of the Tulowitzki trade and entered play Saturday in first place in the division with a 2 1/2-game lead over the Yanks.

Tulowitzki has had a checkered history of health issues. In his 10 seasons in the major leagues, he has played more than 150 games only once. Saturday was his 126th game this season. The Blue Jays have 21 games remaining so he won’t get to 150 this year, either.

Yanks still without rainout-less season

The Yankees got to their 70th home game of the season before their first rainout. Thursday night’s washout, which will be made up in a doubleheader Saturday against the Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium, ruined the possibility that the Yankees might have gone through an entire season without a rainout for the first time in club history.

A Major League Baseball-wide commemoration of Sept. 11, 2001 was scheduled for Friday night. On-field personnel, including players, coaches and umpires, will wear caps with a side patch of United States flags during games. All MLB proceeds from sales of these caps will be donated to the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, the Pentagon Memorial and the Flight 93 Memorial. Special lineup cards and base jewels will be used at every game.

The Blue Jays wore customized camps recognizing both the U.S. and Canada for Friday night’s game at the Stadium on MLB Network Showcase at 7 p.m. MLB Network will also feature coverage of the day’s events MLB in its studio programming.

The Yankees’ doubleheader Saturday will be their first twin bill in exactly one year. They were swept Sept. 12, 2014 at Baltimore by scores of 2-1 and 5-0. The Yanks have been swept just twice in their past 53 doubleheaders (24 winning sweeps, 2 losing sweeps, 27 splits) since June 21, 1996. They are 17-1-13 in their past 31 doubleheaders at home since Sept. 23, 1995. The lone losing sweep was Sept. 17, 2006 against the Red Sox. The Yankees are 7-1-4 in 12 doubleheaders against Toronto, sweeping the last four, including both at the current Stadium Aug. 20, 2013 and Sept. 19, 2012. The others were Sept. 11, 1986 at Toronto’s Exhibition Stadium and Aug. 8, 1983 at the original Yankee Stadium. The Yankees are 4-0-2 against the Blue Jays in doubleheaders in the Bronx.

Rainout sets up traditional doubleheader Saturday

Only tickets dated Saturday, Sept. 12, will be valid for Saturday’s doubleheader between the Yankees and the Blue Jays that was scheduled after Thursday night’s game was postponed due to the forecast for continuing storms throughout the evening. The first game of the traditional twin bill will start at 1:05 p.m. with the second game beginning approximately 30 minutes after the end of the opener.

Those people who held tickets for Thursday, Sept. 10, may exchange them for any regular season game at Yankee Stadium through the end of the 2016 season (subject to availability). Fans should note that there is very limited ticket availability for Saturday’s doubleheader. FOX will broadcast the first game of the doubleheader and the YES Network will broadcast the nightcap.

Thursday night’s Babe Ruth Bobblehead giveaway presented by AT&T will be rescheduled for a date to be determined in 2016.

Complimentary (COMP) tickets for tonight’s game are not valid for any future games. COMP tickets or equivalent tickets bear no cash value and do not have any additional benefits that may be offered to ticket(s) with a dollar value.

For complete information about the Yankees’ rainout policy, please visit http://www.yankees.com/rainout.

For tickets purchased through Yankees Ticket Exchange, please visit http://www.yankees.com/ticketexchange or call 1-800-355-2396 for complete information about its rainout policy.

Yanks-Jays game Sept. 12 now a 1:05 p.m. start

Yankees fans should take note of some scheduling updates for next month.

The Sept. 12 game against the Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium has been changed from a 4:05 p.m. start as originally scheduled to 1:05 p.m. It is the third game of a four-game series against Toronto, following 7:05 p.m. starts Thursday and Friday, Sept. 10-11, and preceding the series finale at 1:05 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 13.

In addition, the finale of the second round of the Subway Series Sunday, Sept. 20, at Citi Field has been selected by ESPN for Sunday Night Baseball and will start at 8:05 p.m. The other two games that weekend between the Yankees and the Mets will be at 7:05 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18, and 1:05 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 19.

Here is the latest promo from Yankees on Demand.
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1-2 Punch (Dellin Betances and Andrew Miller)
http://m.mlb.com/nyy/video/topic/11061776/v390461083/?c_id=nyy

Posada, Pettitte to be honored during homestand

The Yankees were back at Yankee Stadium Monday night for the start of a long homestand. The 10-game stretch will feature a three-game series against the Twins (Monday and Tuesday nights and Wednesday afternoon, a four-game set against the Indians Thursday and Friday nights and Saturday and Sunday afternoons and a three-game series against the Astros next Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights.

As part of separate pregame ceremonies prior to the scheduled 1:05 p.m. games against the Indians on Saturday and Sunday, respectively, the Yankees will honor Jorge Posada and Andy Pettitte by unveiling Monument Park plaques recognizing their careers. Additionally, Posada’s uniform No. 20 and Pettitte’s uniform No. 46 will be retired by the organization. Former teammates, coaches and other guests will take part in the festivities. Gates will open two hours prior to first pitch at 11 a.m. on both days, and fans are encouraged to arrive early and be in their seats by 12 noon.

Posada spent each of his 17 major league seasons with the Yankees from 1995-2011. He batted .273 with 900 runs, 379 doubles, 275 home runs and 1,065 RBI in 1,829 games and 6,092 at-bats. As a player on five World Series championship teams (1996, ‘98, ‘99, 2000, ‘09), Posada finished his career among baseball’s all-time postseason leaders in games (second, 125), doubles (third, 23) and hits (fourth, 103). His 119 postseason contests as a catcher are the most all time. A five-time American League All-Star and Silver Slugger Award winner (each in 2000-03, ’07), Posada twice finished in the top 10 in AL Most Valuable Player balloting — third in 2003 and sixth in 2007.

Pettitte pitched in 15 seasons with the club (1995-2003, ’07-10 and ’12-13). He had a 219-127 record with a 3.94 ERA and 2,020 strikeouts in 447 games (438 starts) and 2,796 1/3 innings. The lefthander is the franchise leader in strikeouts, is tied with Whitey Ford for most starts and trails only Ford (236 victories, 3,171 innings) and Red Ruffing (231 victories, 3,168 innings) in winning decisions and innings pitched for the Yankees. The three-time AL All-Star (1996, 2001 and ’10) is the only pitcher drafted by the Yankees to win 200 games in the majors. As a Yankees pitcher, Pettitte was 18-10 with a 3.76 ERA (251.1IP, 105ER) in 40 career postseason starts and 251 1/3 innings and is the organization’s all-time playoff leader in victories, starts, innings pitched and strikeouts (167).

The seventh annual HOPE Week (Helping Others Persevere & Excel) will run from Monday through Friday. The initiative is a unique week-long community program that brings to light five remarkable stories intended to inspire individuals into action in their own communities. Since its inception in 2009, the Yankees have recognized more than 30 different 501(c)3 organizations as part of HOPE Week.

Each day over the five-day stretch, the Yankees will reach out to an individual, family or organization worthy of recognition and support, surprising honorees with a day celebrating their accomplishments. Outreach will often take place away from the Stadium, which will allow the Yankees to connect personally with individuals in settings that highlight their greatest successes.

Ticket specials will run on Monday, Aug. 17 (Military Personnel Game); Tuesday, Aug. 18 (Military Personnel Game); Wednesday, Aug. 19 (MasterCard Half-Price/Senior Citizen/Student/Youth/Military Personnel Game); Thursday, Aug. 20 (Military Personnel Game); Monday, Aug. 24 (Military Personnel Game); Tuesday, Aug. 25 (Military Personnel Game), and Wednesday, Aug. 26 (MasterCard Half-Price/Senior Citizen/Student/Youth/Military Personnel Game).

For a complete list of ticket specials, including game dates, seating locations, and terms and conditions, fans should visit http://www.yankees.com/ticketspecials. Please note that all ticket specials are subject to availability.

The homestand will also feature the following promotional items and dates:

Monday, August 17 – Yankees vs. Twins, 7:05 p.m.
* Frank Sinatra Music Download Card Night, presented by Universal Music, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Wednesday, August 19 – Yankees vs. Twins, 1:05 p.m.
* Yankees Coloring Book Day, presented by Party City, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 14 and younger.

Thursday, August 20 – Yankees vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Microfiber Cloth Night, presented by The Parking Spot, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Friday, August 21 – Yankees vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Water Bottle Night, presented by Budweiser, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Saturday, August 22 – Yankees vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m.
* Jorge Posada Collector Card Day, presented by Yankees-Steiner Collectibles, to all in attendance.

Sunday, August 23 – Yankees vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m.
* Andy Pettitte Collector Card Day, presented by Yankees-Steiner Collectibles, to all in attendance.

Monday, August 24 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
* Jacoby Ellsbury Bobblehead Night, presented by AT&T, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Tuesday, August 25 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Cap Night, presented by Cooper Tire, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Wednesday, August 26 – Yankees vs. Astros, 1:05 p.m.
* Mark Teixeira Poster Day, presented by Catch 24 Advertising, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 14 and younger.

Tickets may be purchased online at http://www.yankees.com, http://www.yankeesbeisbol.com, at the Yankee Stadium Ticket Office, via Ticketmaster phone at (877) 469-9849, Ticketmaster TTY at (800) 943-4327 and at all Ticket Offices located within Yankees Clubhouse Shops. Tickets may also be purchased on Yankees Ticket Exchange at http://www.yankees.com/yte, the only official online resale marketplace for Yankees fans to purchase and resell tickets to Yankees games. Fans with questions may call (212) YANKEES [926-5337] or email tickets@yankees.com.

For information on parking and public transportation options to Yankee Stadium, please visit http://www.yankees.com and click on the Yankee Stadium tab at the top of the page.

Yanks to honor A-Rod’s 3,000th hit Sept. 13

The Yankees will stage a special pregame ceremony celebrating Alex Rodriguez’s 3,000th career hit prior to their 1:05 p.m. game Sunday, Sept. 13, against the Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium. Gates will open two hours before the first pitch at 11 a.m. and fans are encouraged to arrive early and be in their seats by 12:30 p.m.

Rodriguez became the 29th player in Major League Baseball history to reach the 3,000-hit plateau with a first-inning solo home run June 19 off the Tigers’ Justin Verlander. He is the third player hit a home run as his 3,000th career hit, along with Wade Boggs in 1999 and Derek Jeter in 2011.

A-Rod also joined Jeter as the only players in franchise history to reach 3,000 hits while playing for the Yankees and the only ones to reach the plateau at the Stadium, original or current. With the hit, Rodriguez became one of only three players to collect at least 3,000 career hits and 600 home runs. The others are Willie Mays and Hank Aaron.

School supplies drive part of HOPE Week

In conjunction with 2015 HOPE Week, the Yankees will conduct a back-to-school supplies drive at Yankee Stadium Wednesday, Aug. 19, prior to their 1:05 p.m. game against the Twins.

Beginning at approximately 11 a.m., Yankees players, alongside students from an elementary school in New Jersey, will collect donations at a table outside the Gate 6 entrance at the corner of 161st Street and River Avenue in the Bronx.

Fans are asked to donate new or gently used school supplies, especially backpacks, binders, notebooks and markers, with all items to be given to students from a nearby Bronx elementary school.

Fans who make a donation will be entered into a raffle for a chance to win prizes including Yankees tickets and autographed HOPE Week baseballs. The first 2,500 fans to donate will also receive a commemorative HOPE Week pin.

The seventh annual HOPE Week (Helping Others Persevere & Excel) will be held from Aug. 17-21. The initiative is a unique week-long community program that brings to light five remarkable stories intended to inspire individuals into action in their own communities. Since its inception in 2009, the Yankees have recognized more than 30 different 501(c)3 organizations as part of HOPE Week.

Each day over the five-day stretch, the Yankees will reach out to an individual, family or organization worthy of recognition and support, surprising honorees with a day celebrating their accomplishments. Outreach will often take place away from the Stadium to allow the Yankees to connect personally with individuals in settings that highlight their greatest successes.

This year’s event will mark the fourth year that all of the organization’s U.S.-based minor league affiliates will hold their own HOPE Weeks, allowing the initiative to reach five additional cities and touch more than two dozen additional individuals and groups.

HOPE Week is rooted in the fundamental belief that acts of goodwill provide hope and encouragement to more than just the recipient of the gesture. Fans can learn more about the initiative and nominate inspirational individuals for HOPE Week recognition by visiting the official website at hopeweek.com.

Fans contribute to Yankees’ pain

The Yankees are having a tough enough time these days without the fans making it harder for them. After suffering their second straight shutout loss Sunday to complete a three-game sweep by the surging Blue Jays, the Yankees watched their first-place hold in the American League East dwindle to 1 1/2 games to Toronto, which remains three games behind in the loss column.

Make no mistake, however. The race in the division has tightened up to a degree that the Yankees could not have expected 12 days ago when they had a seven-game lead and were eight games up on the Jays, then in third place. The additions of shortstop Troy Tulowitzki and pitcher David Price before the non-waiver trade deadline last month were serious upgrades for Toronto, which the Yanks witnessed first hand during this lost weekend.

And in Sunday’s 2-0 setback they took their lumps literally as well as figuratively. In the first inning after Josh Donaldson hit a long home run to left field off Masahiro Tanaka, a fan threw the ball back onto the field and struck left fielder Brett Gardner on the right side of his head.

“Not at all,” Gardner said when asked if he was upset. “Don’t care. I was just lucky the guy who threw it wasn’t as close as the second row.”

This tradition of tossing back onto the field opponents’ home runs began at Chicago’s Wrigley Field in the 1980s and has been part of the Yankee Stadium experience as well for some time. I must admit that it never made any sense to me. If I were to catch a home run ball in the stands, I would not throw it back onto the field. I would keep it and bring it home to my kids. Why honor a tradition that began with a franchise that has not won a World Series for more than 100 years?

Gardner was kind not to make a big deal out of it. In fact, he even said the fans were correct in getting on him because neither he nor teammate Jacoby Ellsbury did very much at the top of the order in this series. They were a combined 2-for-23 (both hits were singles by Gardner) with two walks and no runs scored in the series.

Less accepting of fans’ behavior was first baseman Mark Teixeira, who was still annoyed after the game that a fan in the box seats interfered with him as he tried to catch a foul ball by Blue Jays designated hitter Chris Colabello in the ninth inning. Colabello eventually struck out, but Tex was still sore about the situation.

“Tell the fans they can insult but not assault,” he said. “I know we just lost three games, and we’re sorry about that. But, please, no assaults, just insults.”

It was that kind of series for the Yankees, who scored only one run in the three games, none in the last two and are in a scoreless streak that has reached 26 innings, their longest in 24 years. The last time the Yankees went this long without scoring was back in the Stump Merrill days of May 15-18, 1991, a stretch of 32 blank innings.

The Yankees were shut out in consecutive games for the first time since May 12-13, 1999 against the Angels and had played 2,665 games between the consecutive shutout streaks, the longest stretch of not being shut out in back-to–back games in major league history, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

The Yankees began the homestand last Tuesday night with a 13-3 victory over the Red Sox. They scored only four runs in their next 45 innings.

“Just a bump in the road,” Teixeira said.

It was actually more like an enormous pothole. The Yankees wasted several strong pitching performances, including Tanaka’s six-inning stint Sunday in which he allowed three hits and no walks with five strikeouts. Unfortunately, two of the hits were home runs. Joining Donaldson was Jose Bautista with a solo blast in the fourth. The Jays out-homered the Yanks in the series, 6-1.

“It is never a good thing to get swept at home by the team that is chasing you,” Gardner said. “We’ll try to have a short-term memory, regroup on the off-day [Monday] and get back to our game in Cleveland. There are still another six or seven weeks left in the season.”

The Yankees found out over the weekend the rest of the season will be more challenging than they may have realized not that long ago.

Yanks partner with CLEAR for expedited access

The Yankees announced plans Wednesday for security enhancements and expedited-access entry points at Yankee Stadium through a partnership with CLEAR – the secure biometric identity platform sanctioned by Major League Baseball and serving 12 airports in the United States, including Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW), Las Vegas (LAS), Miami (MIA), San Francisco (SFO) and New York’s Westchester County (HPN).

Beginning Friday, ticketholders for the Yankees, NYCFC and other events held at the Stadium who are registered by CLEAR will be able to utilize Fast Access entryways, which will allow expedited entry to the building.

Fans may register for the service with a CLEAR representative at a tent located outside of the Stadium’s Gate 4 on Yankees and NYCFC game days. Registration is free. Activation of the service for those who are approved by CLEAR is immediate. Fast Access-approved entry lanes will be located at Gate 2 (Jerome Avenue and E. 164th Street) for all ticketholders and the Suite Entrance (next to Gate 4 on E. 161st Street) for suite ticketholders. Current CLEAR members will be able to use Fast Access lines immediately.

“Ensuring the safety of our guests is our top priority at every event held at Yankee Stadium,” Yankees chief operating officer and general counsel Lonn Trost said. “At the same time, we are continually looking to improve upon every aspect of the fan experience. Our partnership with CLEAR has the dual benefit of allowing us to augment our standard of security while providing better game day service to our guests.”

“CLEAR calls New York home, making us especially thrilled to partner with the New York Yankees to provide fans with a winning experience,” CLEAR chief executive officer Caryn Seidman-Becker said. “CLEAR uses innovative technology to delight our users, whether they are watching their beloved Yankees or traveling through one of our nation’s busiest airports. Everything we do has a common goal – to provide a frictionless customer experience.”

CLEAR has announced partnerships this season at two other MLB facilities – the Giants’ AT&T Park in San Francisco and the Rockies’ Coors Field in Denver.

Fans should continue to note that all bags brought into the Stadium – including by CLEAR registrants – will require screening by security personnel. Only MLB-compliant bags (soft-sided, measuring 16 inches by 16 inches by 8 inches or smaller) will be permitted inside the Stadium.

In 2012, Yankee Stadium became the first sports venue in the United States to be covered with a federal SAFETY-Act designation and certification from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

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